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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

V, 




Mnual Ueport, 1972 




Storm's End 



Town of Wilmington, 
Massachusetts 



OUR COVER 

"Storm's End," by artist Joseph R. Corish of Somerville, lawyer, and marine painter. 
Mr. Corish, who graduated from Harvard and Boston University, served five years as 
Art Director at Castle Hill Foundation, has lectured on fine arts at various colleges, 
and as a Director of the North Shore Arts Association and the Copley Society. His 
paintings have been in various exhibitions at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Busch 
Reisinger Museum, at Harvard, Yale, Boston University, Connecticut College, the 
Jordan Exhibition of Contemporary New England Artists and various exhibitions 
where they have won several awards. 

Specializing in marine painting — his studio is located on the rocky shore of 
Norman's Woe — his paintings hang in the ward rooms of ships of ttie Spanish, 
Portuguese, and United States Navies, and in banks, colleges, court houses, and 
other public and private institutions. 



Index 



:le Page 

:epted Streets 60 

ird of Appeals 30 

ird of Assessors 10 

ird of Health 46 

ird of Registrars 14 

ird of Selectmen 3 

irds, Committees, & Commissions 7 

.Iding Inspector 25 

rter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 82 

letery Department 29 

iservation Commission 40 

istable 24 

rectory of Officials 6 

; Officer 49 

:e Department 19 

;hway Department 30 

ising Authority 82 

lustrial Development Commission 15 

ry List 56 

)rarian 36 

)rary Trustees 34 

rmanent Building Committee 15 

inning Board 20 

Lice Department 22 

}llc Buildings Department 32 

:reation Commission 42 

levelopment Authortiy 45 

lool Committee 65 

ilex of Weights & Measures 33 

iwsheen Valley Technical School 73 

i^erintendent of Schools 68 

tm Accountant 137 

im Clerk 12 

im Collector 9 

<m Counsel 16 

•ra Engineer 26 

■m Manager 4 

m Meetings & Elections Annual Tovm Meeting - March 4, 1972 83 

Presidential Primary - April 25, 1972 116 

State Primary - September 19, 1972 120 

Special Town Meeting - October 30, 1972 123 

State Election - November 7, 1972 132 

l"m Treasurer 11 

lie Department 28 

iterans Agent 59 

ter & Sewer Department 38 

1 




Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the People of Wilmington: 

During the past ^ear Wilmington has been undergoing a residential building boom. While 
we welcome new residents to our Town, it must be remembered that residential building 
does mean increased cost in the fojrm of school and town services. The real estate taxes 
received from homes pay only about 60% of the cost of providing all of the required 
municipal services. 

The Board of Selectmen is concerned about the impact of higher taxes on the townspeople, 
and together with the Town Manager, has effected programs and policies designed to 
attract nonresidential building to the Town to help pay the increased cost incurred by 
a growing community. 

We have been saddened during the past year by the deaths of Officer Frederick Ward, 
Police Department; Mrs. Olive Sheldon, Assessors' Department; and Mrs. Janet Small, 
Library Department, who can be described as three loyal employees who will be missed 
both professionally and personally. 

The right to govern ourselves is a right we should protect by voluntary participation on 
the various Boards, Commissions and Committees. Citizens should also take the opportunity 
to attend the monthly or weekly meetings of these committees to gain a better understanding 
of our local government. 

The selectmen wish to thank the members of other boards and employees for their cooperation 
and hard work in trying to make Wilmington - "a nice town to live in". 

Respectfully submitted, 

George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 

James F. Banda 

Carl A. Backman, Jr. 

Michael A. Caira 

A. Daniel Gillis 



Town of Wilm iivcxoisr 

MASSACHUSETTS 01887 

OFFICE OF THE A.CA CODE 6.7 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 



Over the past year, we concentrated on a few specific objectives and goals to provide 
a high quality municipal service for the residents of Wilmington. 

Major accomplishments of 19 72 include the adoption of the Revised By-Laws, the creation 
of a Council on Aging, reconstruction of a portion of Andover Street, the construction 
of a permanent water pumping station at the Town Park Wellfield, the acceptance as Town 
ways the layout of Dell Drive, Baland Road and Hopkins Street, strengthened the admin- 
istration and appeal procedure under the Board of Appeals by an amendment to the Zoning 
By-Law and created a new district under the Zoning By-Law known as Flood Plain District. 

The people who attended the Special Town Meeting permitted us to establish the Wilmington 
Industrial Development Commission. The Commission has been assisting the existing major 
industrial parks in obtaining selective industries. The Board of Selectmen during 1972 
approved a sanitary sewer expansion plan which was executed by a contract for preliminary 
construction drawing which would extend our M.D.C. sewer line from Eames Street, through 
Wilmington Square, with lateral sewer lines around the Silver Lake area and continue to 
the site of the proposed new high school area on Salem Street and then terminate well up 
on Ballardvale Street in North Wilmington. The construction of sanitary sewers in the 
near future is a must if we are to control future contamination of our ground water, and 
if we are going to effectively encourage industrial and commercial expansion. The tax 
rate is directly influenced by whether we have residential and industrial growth or, as 
in the immediate past, just residential growth. 

The Townspeople were farsighted in my opinion in acquiring more land and buildings during 
1972 adjacent to our biggest natural asset. Silver Lake, and the plan for acquiring all 
the land that borders the lake will continue over the next few years to protect its common 
use for all residents of Wilmington. Hopefully this land acquisition plan can become part 
of a State matching fund grant so that the cost will be partially funded by State monies. 

We completed during 1972 the professional review of the accounting, clerical, financial 
reporting and budget procedures of the government of Wilmington, and as a result commenced 
computer processing of all payrolls which covers 700 employees and makes our entire 
accounting operation more efficient. We have also computerized the real estate billing 
procedure. Other improved administrative and management recommendations will shortly be 
implemented to better control this large municipal enterprise. A copy of this study is 
available at the Memorial Library for inspection by the citizens. 



The Selectmen have appointed a Solid Waste Disposal Committee to assist the administration 
in finding an immediate and long range solution to this necessary function of our 
government. Subcommittees will, no doubt, be formed and future tax dollars will be saved 
if anyone would care to volunteer their assistance to help formulate the plans in this field. 

A contract with the Federal Government under the Emergency Employment Act of 1971 was obtained 
during the past year which permitted us to hire many additional employees and to provide many 
additional services during this period. The 1972 income amounted to $94,000. The temporary 
services included: the hiring of extra people for the library, three extra police officers, an 
assistant to the Recreation Director, many extra men in the Highway Department who were used 
for special road side pickup, fence and guardrail repair, sign painting, sign installation, 
survey crews in the Engineering Department, maintenance men in the Public Buildings Department 
and Cemetery Department, many clerical positions in various departments, and a full time 
industrial development director. This additional work force has been provided without cost 
to the taxpayers with the exception of some cost associated with record keeping and office 
equipment needs . 

We are pleased to report the receipt of $379,080 as of this date of Revenue Sharing Funds from 
the Federal Government, and the sum has been invested. 

As a final reference to the accomplishments of 19 72, we have taken advantage of the Federal-Aid 
Highway Act of 1970 by signing an agreement with the State and Federal Governments for local 
highway improvements. The program is known as TOPICS and has a potential financial impact of 
$1,110,000 to provide these highway improvements without substantial local tax assessments. We 
would need to fund locally the acquisition of any land associated with the future construction 
projects. A copy of the agreement and related locations and projects is available at the Town 
Hall for your inspection. 

I wish to acknowledge that the progress, which has been made over the past year, is due to the 
leadership provided by the Board of Selectmen, and the services have been of high quality due 
to the professional attitude of our department heads and hard work by our employees. 

The Town of Wilmington will benefit most of all, in the future, by your presence at the 
Town Meeting. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Sterling C. 1 
Town Manager 



5 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - JANUARY 1. 1972 - 1973 



Town Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Superintendent of Schools 



Walter H. Pierce 



Acting Superintendent of Schools 



Derek R. Little 



Term 
Expires 



Board of Selectmen 



George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 

James F. Banda 

Carl A. Backman, Jr. 

Michael A. Caira 

A. Daniel Gillis 



1974 
1974 
1973 
1975 
1975 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



Annuall' 



School Committee 



L. Barbara Hooper, Chairman 
Diana C. Imbimbo 
Richard W. Thackeray 
John Brooks 

Nancy H. Clark (Interim Appointment) 
James A. Demos 



1975 
1973 
1973 
1974 
1974 
1975 



Finance Committee 



Arthur F. Spear, Jr., Chairman 
Richard W. Cogan, Vice Chairman 
Richard D. Duggan, Secretary 
Richard V. Barry 
Rodney E. Laughton 
Charles F. Mather 
Thomas E. Casey 
Madelyn A. McKie 
Christian G. Bachman 



1975 
19 74 
1975 
1973 
1973 
1973 
1974 
1974 
1975 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS - JANUARY 1, 1972 - 1973 



PEAL, BOARD OF 

ank F. Santo, Secretary 1973 

uce MacDonald 1974 

ward T. Welch 1975 

lliam A. Caperci, Associate 1973 

ter Enos, Associate 1973 

orge G. Robertie, Associate 1973 



SESSORS, BOARD OF 

thony E. Rrzeminski, Principal 

y P. McClanahan 

ive M. Sheldon 

RTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 



delon C. Slater, Chairman 1973 

rjorie M. Emery 1973 

Idred E. Neilson 1974 

nneth Wilson 1975 



HEALTH, BOARD OF 

James J. Durkee, Chairman 1974 

Marion C. Boylen 1973 

Joseph A. Paglia 1975 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Kathleen S. Patterson, Chairman 1973 
Raymond J. Spahl, Rep. of State Housing Bd. 1973 

Leo M. Woodside 1973 

Pearl H. Hersom, Vice Chairman 1976 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Roland I. Wood, Chairman 19 74 

E. Hayward Bliss 1973 

Evelyn M. Norton 1974 

Philip B, Buzzell 1975 

Shirley F. Callan, V. Chmn. 5. Sec. 1975 



METERY COMMISSIONERS 

His C. Lyford, Chairman 1975 

lliam F. Cavanaugh 1973 

oraas H. McMahon 1974 

NSERVATION COMMISSION 

sula M. Leahy, Chairman 1975 

thur W. Bureau 1973 

ancis A. Ottati 1974 

ice Papaliolios, Vice Chairman 1974 

orge H. Rushton 1974 

ncy E. Kaufman 1975 



PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 

Timothy P. Benoit 1973 

Francis Sferrazza, Chairman 1973 

Leonard A. Gustus 1974 

Larry Neol 1974 

Jean C. Lefavour 1975 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr., Chairman 1975 

Joseph J. Hartka 1973 

Arthur G. Pizzuti 1973 

Robert B. Michelson 1974 

David A. Holbrook 1975 



UNCIL FOR AGING 

ace Ball 1974 

ace Bourbeau 19 74 

ester M. Crowell, Jr. 1974 

ene Hulme 1974 

vld Omdoff 1974 

adys Babine 1975 

eryl Everett 1975 

gus MacFeeley 1975 



UG COMMITTE E 
an D. Kritter, Chairman 
rol A. Cooke, Secretary 
ott Kent 

chael DiGregorio 
ster E. White 

ECTIONS OFFICERS 

anley Webber, Warden Annually 

lliam H. Russell, Deputy Warden " 

retta R. Caira, Clerk " 

yllis M. O'Leary, Deputy Clerk " 

ive M. Sheldon, Inspector " 

orence A. Balkus, Deputy Inspector " 

izabeth Cavanaugh " 

ry E. Woods " 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 
Joseph Cuoco 
Alan P. Dellascio 
Robert J. Woods 



PLANNING BOARD 

William G. Hooper, Jr., Chairman 1974 

Arthur E. Harding, Jr. 1973 

Robert F. Leahy 1973 

William D. MacKinnon, Jr. 1973 

William J. Hanlon 1976 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 1976 

Robert F. Leahy, Sec. & Acting Dir. 1973 

Richard W. Thackeray, Treasurer 19 74 

Milton L. Bradford, Ass't. Treas. & State Mem. 1974 

William F. Butt 1977 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL /TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Frank H. McLean 1973 

Eugene L. Kritter 1974 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

F. Talbot Emery, Chairman 1975 

Robert L. Cavanaugh 1973 

Mary G. Condrey 1974 



7 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Harold E. Melzar, Chairman 
Arnold C. Blake 
Mary E. Denault, Secretary 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
Arnold C. Blake, Chairman 
Robert Mullarky 
Vincent R. McLain 

WASTE DISPOSAL SITE STUDY COMMITTEE 



John M. Graney 
Edwin Nash 
Edmund H. Sargent 



Mrs. Robert Rando 
Clyde F. Shufelt 
Donald White 



1973 
1974 
1975 



1974 
1973 
1975 



WILMINGTON INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 

COMMISSION 

Lloyd C. Bender, Chairman 
Lionel M. Baldwin 
Bernard F. Brady 
Rocco V. DePasquale 
Vemice Hensey 
Joseph Maffeo 
Frank J. Rosa 

Richard E. Pomery, Exec. Dir. 

ELECTRIC RATE STUDY COMMITTEE 
Rudy Carrasco 
Diane Fielding 
George W. Hooper 



12/31/ 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1, 1972 - 1973 

Accountant 

Administrative Assistant 

Animal Inspector 

Building Inspector 

Cemetery Superintendent 

Civil Defense Director 

Constables A. John 

Dog Officer 

Engineer (Acting) 

Fence Viewers Maurice D. 

Fire Chief 

Gas Inspector 

Highway Superintendent 

Ipswich River Watershed Commission 

Librarian 

Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission 

Medical Agent, Board of Health 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Milk Inspector 

Nurse, Public Health 

Nurses, School Joan M. Bachman, 

Physician, School 

Plumbing Inspector 

Public Buildings Superintendent 

Police Chief 

Recreation Director 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Town Clerk 

Town Clerk (Assistant) 

Town Collector 

Town Collector (Deputy) 

Town Counsel 

Town Sanitarian 

Town Treasurer 

Town Treasurer (Assistant) 

Tree Warden and Moth Superintendent 

Veteran's Agent 

Veteran's Grave Officer 

Water Superintendent 

Wire Inspector 

8 



Robert H. Peter 
Mary E . Denaul 
Joseph V. Balestrier 
Charles P. Lawrens 
Francis E. Down 
Silverius J. Blonige 
Imbimbo, Arthur J. Kellej 
Joseph V. Balestrie 
John Majes 
O'Neil, Edmund H. Sargen 
Arthur J. Boudre 
William R. Harriso 
Robert P. Palme 
George W. Boylen, J 
Philip W. Meri 
William G. Meye 
Gerald A. Fagan, M.D 
Madelyn A. McKi 
Ernest F. Roman 
Anne Butters, R.N 
R.N., Sylvia Levine, R.N 
Gerald A. Fagan, M.D 
William R. Harriso 
Roy P. McClanahai 
Paul J. Lyncl 
Ronald Swase 
Martin P. Farrel 
Esther L. Russel 
Margaret A. Wagstaf 
Marion C. Murph; 
Catherine P. Lindmarl 
Alan Altmai 
Ernest F. Roman' 
Mary E. Denaul 
Elizabeth R. Fosgat> 
Thomas 0. Sullivai 
Paul A. Farrel 
Paul A. Farrel 
Kenneth C. Motschmam 
Charles L. Webster 



Town Collector 



PAL COMMITMENTS - 1972 



$ 7,227,361.99 



72 Real Estate 

72 Water Liens 

72 App. Street Betterments 

Dunitted Interest 

72 App. Water Betterments 

Domitted Interest 

72 Personal Property 

72 Motor Vehicle Excise 

72 Farm 

71 Motor Vehicle Excise 

72 App. Street Betterments Paid in Full 
mmitted Interest 

72 App. Water Betterments Paid in Full 
nnnitted Interest 



6,533,716.80 
18,105.85 
6,875.37 
2,845.43 
5,961.73 
2,834.76 
186,669.60 
365,414.46 
79.86 
95,725.22 
2,296.19 
2.52 
6,740.38 
93.82 



LLECTIONS 1972 



1972 



1971 



ALL OTHERS 



al Estate 
ter Liens 

p. Street Betterments 

mmitted Interest 

p. Water Betterments 

mmitted Interest 

tor Vehicle Excise 

rsonal Property 

rm 

p. Street Betterments Paid in Full 
mmitted Interest 

p. Water Betterments Paid in Full 

mmitted Interest 

app. Street Betterments 

teres t and Costs - all years 

nicipal Lien Certificates and 

Certificates Dis. Betterments 

ibulance 

vertising Charges 

gistry of Motor Vehicles Releases 

puties Fees 

ter Department Collections 



$ 6,106,063.84 
15,228.08 
6,372.01 
2,584.04 
4,643.73 
2,259.16 
270,399.94 
182,730.60 
79.86 
2,296.19 
2.52 
6,740.38 
93.82 
7,149.75 
10,115.12 

2,586.00 
3,658.25 
38.50 
308.00 
49.00 
354,724.85 



113,319.06 
2,762.72 
236.54 
95.44 
966.58 
458.61 
99,579.52 
2,291.94 



5,634.86 



TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



$ 7,203,468.91 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1972 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 

Amount Necessary to Satisfy Final Court Judgments 

Total Deficits 

School Lunch Program 

Free Public Libraries 

Natural Resources, Self Help Program 

County Retirement Assessment 

County Tax 

County Hospital Assessment 
State Recreation Areas 
Audit of Municipal Accounts 
Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 

Metropolitan Districts Area Charge (1971 Underestimate) 
Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 
Ipswich River Watershed District 
Overlay of Current Year 

Gross Amount to be Raised 



$ 8,158,832.17 
472,264.75 
750.00 
222,968.83 
36,692.27 
6,413.25 
10,000.00 
128,024.00 
155,163.73 
8,507.17 
31,497.59 
6,067.06 
64,122.14 
3,342.38 
171,294.00 
1,693.95 
2,237.69 
169.710.40 



$ 8,631,096. 



1.018,484. 
$ 9,649,581. 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds : 

1972 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid & Agency Funds 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 

Licenses 

Fines 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways 

School (Local Receipts of School Committee) 

Libraries 

Recreation 

Cemeteries 

Interest 

Farm Animal 

Ambulance Services 

Sewer Revenue 

Misc. Receipts 

Surplus Revenue Late Receipts received 1-14-72 
Total Estimated Receipts 

Overestimates 

Voted from Available Funds 
Total Available Funds 
Total Estimated Receipts 

Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



$ 1,838,600.10 
434,133.48 
4,000.00 
12,024.00 
12,144.10 
6,783.91 
19,451.65 
4,846.50 
2,246.20 
7,003.00 
1,319.10 
370.00 
6,806.50 
24,701.08 
129.38 
3,370.48 
26,821.80 
3,902.66 
33,329.94 
$ 2,441,983.88 



19,392.35 
472,264.75 
491,657.10 



$ 2,933,640. 
$ 6,715,940. 



10 



capitulation - 1972 (continued) 

rsonal Property 3,589,800.00 (? $52.00 per M $ 186,669.60 

al Estate 225,562,900.00 (3 $52.00 per M 6.529.270.80 

lotal Taxes Levied on Property $ 6,715,940.40 

gms not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate ; 

L. Betterment and Special Assessments added to taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest 9,720.80 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 8,796.49 

2. Water Liens added to taxes: 18,105.85 

Total 36,623.14 

Total of all other commitments $ 6,752,563.54 



Town Treasurer 



ish on Hand - January 1, 1972 734,006.35 

iceipts 17,337,324.74 

Lsbursements 16,863,314.60 

ish on Hand - December 31, 1972 1,208,016.49 

Lvestments : 

irlng 1972 the program of investing idle funds from Bond Issues and Revenue Funds was continued with a 
isulting profit of $13,861.12. 



11 



Town Clerk 



VITAL STATISTICS - CHAPTER 46, GENERAL LAWS AS AMENDED ; 

Births - final figure for 1971 263 

Births - actually recorded to date for 1972 251 

Marriage Intentions recorded 211 

Marriages recorded 232 

Deaths recorded ' 108 

CHAPTER 46, SECTION 15 ; 



The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

CHAPTER 114, SECTION 45 : 

Twenty-five Burial Permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health in 
1972. Fifteen out-of-state deaths reported and filed in this office. Three W.W. II Veterans died out-of- 
town and were buried in Wilmington. One removal from Wilmington to Maine. 

TOWN RECORDS 

PERMITS AND CERTIFICATES OF REGISTRATION FOR THE STORAGE OF INFLAMMABLES : 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in 
the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March 15. 
If not registered by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority after a public hearing. 



Inflammables 87 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 609 

Uniform Commercial Code terminations 30 

Federal Tax Lien recordings 7 

Dog Licenses issued as of January 11, 1973 1,729 

Duplicate dog tags issued to January 11, 1973 22 

Business Certificates recorded 39 

Business withdrawals 2 

Fish and Game Licenses 923 

Pole Locations 22 

Medical Registrations 

Bazaars and Raffles 5 

Identification liquor purchase cards 4 




Keep minutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up to date. (Certify same upon request.) 

Town Clerk has complete charge of elections. Records election results. 

Send State Election results to State Secretary forthwith. 

Keep Jury List up to date. Draw jurors when court orders come through. 

Certified an undetermined number of Births, Marriages and Deaths. 

Certified an undetermined number of Births, Abstract forms - used for school entrances, 

drivers' licenses, out-of-state travel and job applications. 
Proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrance - an undetermined number. 
Miscellaneous sales of books and maps - undetermined number. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 
Occasionally appear in Court for the Town when summoned - producing all papers and maps 
required. 

Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by the 

Selectmen. Certify same. 
Record Board of Appeal Decisions. 
Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 
Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 
Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all zoning and Town By-law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear Town Officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

The Town Clerk, in her capacity as a Justice of the Peace, certified an undetermined number 
of legal papers for town officers. Married couples by appointment when presented with the 
proper credentials. 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, 
I have - 

Met with the Board on regular meetings and special meetings. 
Kept the minutes of the Board up to date. 
Worked with the Police on the census. 
Kept the voting list up to date. 

Beginning in 1973 the town will be divided into six (6) precincts as is directed by law. 
The voting list is now being printed in precinct form. 
Registered voters during office hours. 

Supervised the distribution and filing of Nomination papers. 
Prepared the Town ballot and ordered the printing of same. 
Supervised the printing of the "Persons' Listed" book. 

Hired election workers. Supervised the payrolls for town meeting and election workers. 
Used Voting Machines for the first time for the September Primary and the Presidential 
Election with great success. 

a supply of books, "Births, Marriages and Deaths" from 1730 to 1898, compiled by James E. Kelley, 
at the Town Clerk's office for the price of $2.00 per copy. 



13 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars were held 
the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and the conduct of business. Under Chapter 6 
of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it is so posted in the Town Hall. 

This was a busy year - four elections and two Town Meetings. This meant many hours spent registering voters 
and certifying names on nomination papers and articles for the Town Meetings. 

The election laws are changing constantly, and we are hard put to keep up with them. The latest being that 
there is now no residency requirement. 

Women, married prior to January 1, must re-register under their marriage name. 

In order to keep the voting list as up to date as possible, the Board annually compares the voting list with 
the yearly census. If a voter's name does not appear in the census, it is subject to removal from the votin 
register. Drop letters are sent to these people advising them to get in touch with the Town Clerk. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence in the 
town. Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention of the Board 
so that you name will not be removed from the voting list inadvertently. 



1972 Town Census 17,600 

1972 Dogs Listed 2,273 

Registered Voters as of January 1, 1972: 

Democrats 3,012 

Republicans 1,111 

Undeclared 3,410 

Total Registered Voters 7,533 



(As reported to State 2/11/72) 




Voting Machines at the Presidential election 



14 



Industrial Development Commission 



!e Wilmington Industrial Development Commission respectfully submits the following report of its progress 
id operations. By act of the Special Town Meeting of October 30, 1972, the Commission was created. 

have undertaken the following as immediate high priority projects: 

1. A complete inventory of Commercial/Industrial land within our community to include its most 
significant features, and its most useful and practical occupancy. 

2. Inventory of all Commercial/Industrial buildings, occupied or unoccupied to include square 
footage, owner-of-record, present use, number employed. 

3. "What's Right and ''.'hat's VJrong with Wilmington" — Questionnaire for our present Commercial/ 
Industrial residdts. 

.e purpose of the Questionnaire is twofold, the first use in establishing guidelines for potential Commercial/ 
dustrial prospects, the second is to define existing problem areas where we might be able to help correct 
ich problems which would stimulate Commercial/Industrial cooperation for further development. 

; have opened lines of communication with Local and National Industrial Realtors to enlist their cooperation. 



Permanent Building Committee 



the past year the Permanent Building Committee has completed the paper work for administrative processing 
r the Shawsheen School and the Wilmington Memorial Library. 

e committee has had land surveyed for a proposed hockey rink adjacent to the Shawsheen School. 

ter extensive field searching by the committee, the major accomplishment was the land assembly program 
ted by the Town to be acquired for the construction of a new High School facility. 

e committee is presently engaged in the selection of an architect to prepare preliminary plans and speci- 
cations and cost estimates for a new High School, The committee is also working with the School Committee 
acquire temporary kindergarten facilities in existing non-school structures in the Town. 



15 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town Counsel cover- 
ing the year 1972. 

A. On January 1, 1972, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of action 
in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien fore- 
closure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity for appeal for varianc 
of zoning by-laws) . 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) . 

Joseph Scaro, etal v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

Town of Wilmington v. John Benevento etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the removal of 
soil, loam, sand or gravel). 

Robert W. Wisleder, etux v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assess- 
ment of damages for land taking) . 

David B. Hill etux v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

Timothy P. Benoit, etux v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) . 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the Boarc 
of Appeals) . 

John J. Elia v. Bruce MacDonald etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for writ of certiorari con- 
cerning revocation of a gasoline storage license) . 

John T. Brackett etal v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) . 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) . 

John E. Hayward etal v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment oil 
damages for land taking) . < 



16 



Hlllcrest Realty, Inc. v. A. Daniel Gillis etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of decision of 
lannlng Board denying approval of definitive subdivision) . 

Morton Grant etals v. Robert E. Jennings etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the 
lard of Appeals) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Lee A. Ward etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for property 
sage to a police cruiser) . 

Town of Wilmington v. VIP Auto Rentals, Inc., Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Action of 
itract for excise taxes due) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for contempt for failure 
comply with final decree) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Boston & Maine Railroad, U. S. District Court - Bankruptcy in re - Boston & Maine 
ilroad Reorganization Proceedings (Claim for real estate taxes due) . 

lere are pending as of January 1, 1973, 46 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
3ard, many involving claims for several different years. 

(1) During the year 1972, the following new actions were brought against the Town or its officers or 
agents : 

Angelo Petrosino, etux v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Bill in Equity to remove cloud in title) . 

Robert W. Meserve etal Trustees for the property of Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation v. Town of 
Lmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) . 

John J. Elia, Trustee v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
nages) . 

Richard D. Zambernardi etal v. Board of Selectmen, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit in equity for 
:laratory judgment to determine the validity of betterment assessment). 

Patricia A. Millward v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Action in tort for personal injury 
d consequential damage) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission, etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex and 
■fil Service Commission (Hearings concerning suspension of firefighter) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission, etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex and 
>^il Service Commission (Hearings concerning suspension of firefighter) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission , etal , Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex and 
jjl Service Commission (Hearings concerning suspension of firefighter) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission, etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex and 
/il Service Commission (Hearings concerning suspension of firefighter) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission, etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex and 
/il Service Commission (Hearings concerning suspension of firefighter) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission, etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex and 
/il Service Commission (Hearings concerning suspension of firefighter) . 

Wilmington Police Officer v. Civil Service Commission, etal (Hearing before the Civil Service Commission 
icerning suspension of Town employee) . 



17 



B. (2) During the year 1972, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. John L. Jackson, Jr., etals. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Action 
in tort to recover for property damage to West School) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph A. LaCreta, Middlesex Superior Court , (Petition in equity to enforce the 
Zoning By-Law) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Charles George etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity to enforce the 
Zoning By-Law) . 

Town of Wilmington v. William MacClellen etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Action in 
tort for property damage) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Walter J. Pupkis, etux. Trustees, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex 
(Action of contract or tort for damages to Town public way) . 

C. During the year 1972, the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of: 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex anc 
Civil Service Commission (Disposed of by Civil Service Commission affirming action of appointing authority 
and by Justice of Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex dismissing petition for review) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex anc 
Civil Service Commission (Disposed of by Civil Service Commission affirming action of appointing authority 
and by Justice of Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex dismissing petition for review). 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex anc 
Civil Service Commission (Disposed of by Civil Service Commission affirming action of appointing authority 
and by Justice of Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex dismissing petition for review). 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex anc 
Civil Service Commission (Disposed of by Civil Service Commission affirming action of appointing authority 
and by Justice of Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex dismissing petition 
for review) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex ^nc i 
Civil Service Commission (Disposed of by Civil Service Commission affirming action of appointing authority 
and by Justice of Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex dismissing petition for review) . 

Wilmington Firefighter v. Civil Service Commission etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex ant 



Civil Service Commission (Disposed of by Civil Service Commission affirming action of appointing authority 
and by Justice of Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex dismissing petition for review) . 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. v. Robert E. Jennings , etal , Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by Final 
Decree Dismissing Bill) . 



a 



Robert W. Wisleder, etux v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by settlemi 
damages to be paid by the County of Middlesex) . 

David B. Hill etux v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by settlement 
damages to be paid by the County of Middlesex) . 



Timothy P. Benoit, etux v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by settle- 
ment - damages to be paid by the County of Middlesex) . 

Town of Wilmington v. VIP Auto Rentals, Inc., Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of 
by compromise and payment of $5,000 to the Town of Wilmington). 

Town of Wilmington v. William MacClellen, etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed o 
by payment of $3,350.53 to the Town by the insurance company). 

Wilmington Police Officer v. Civil Service Commission etal, Civil Service Commission (Disposed of by 
Civil Service Commission affirming action of appointing authority) . 

18 



II 



Fire Department 



; manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy, four Lieutenants, and twenty-four Privates. There is a call 
rce of twelve members. The department responded to a total of one thousand one hundred eighty (1,180) 
Lis. 



Residential Buildings 46 

Commercial Buildings 8 

Vehicles 87 

Brush, grass and rubbish 178 



Out of Town Assistance 9 

False Alarms or Needless Calls 46 

Rescue or Emerg. Ambulance 610 

Service Calls 196 



tal value of property endangered was 
tal property loss was 



$ 4,877,150 
$ 124,532 



rmits issued for blasting 

rmits issued for storage of propane gas and oil 



30 
88 



spections were made of all schools, public buildings, and all inflammable storage as required by law. 

2 Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Inspector Lyons, made inspections of all business establish- 
ats in town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of industrial fire brigades. 
B Junior Fire Marshal Plan was conducted in all of the 5th grades, and Fire Prevention lectures were given 
all the schools. 

2 Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Private Blaisdell, made all necessai^ repairs to the fire 
arm system, and one hundred and two change-overs for the Light and Telephone companies were made. Extended 
e alarm system down Parker Street into Allen Park Drive. 

Ivates John Brown, Thomas Robbins, Walter Sowyrda, Edmund Corcoran, Alfred Meuse, Edward Fuller, Joseph 
adergan and Gerald Duggan completed a twelve week course of Practical Emergency Care at the Winchester 
spital. 

eutenant Silverius Blonigen, Privates John Brown and Edmund Corcoran completed a two week Rescue Course for 
structors at the Mass. Civil Defense Training Academy. 

eutenant Silverius Blonigen, Privates Edward Lyons, Phillip Watson, William Lopez, Walter Sowyrda and 
fred Meuse attended a refresher course in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation at the Northeast Chapter Mass. 
art Association. 

puty Chief Daniel Wandell, Lieutenant Silverius Blonigen, Privates John Brown and Edmund Corcoran are 
tending courses at the North Shore Community College. 



19 



Planning Board 



The Wilmington Planning Board has returned to its original membership level of five. The changes include the 
following: 

1. Dan Gillis — resigned to become a Selectman 

2. Zane Bower — term expired 

3. Mort Grant — resigned for business reasons 

4. Arthur Harding — appointed to the Board 

The years of service devoted by the retiring members are well appreciated by all. Our new member brings with 
him the tremendous asset of having served Wilmington as Town Engineer for several years. 

At the last Annual Town Meeting, the following was of interest: 

1. Requirements for General Business lot sizes were increased. 

2. Our proposal for Planned Unit Development Districts was defeated by a vote that was a 

ratio of seven to one against. We have taken this as a mandate that the Town does 
not desire any multiple family dwellings, or does not want to change the town's single 
residence character. 

3. The entire Section VIII of the Zoning By-law was replaced with that basically recommended 

in our Comprehensive General Plan ("Master Plan") . 

4. Flood Plain Zoning was unanimously endorsed by the Planning Board. After our two previous 

attempts, the Conservation Commission made an excellent presentation and thoroughly con 
vinced the Town. 

On the statistical side of the ledger, we were busy as usual. 

1. Public hearings were held. 

a. One on zoning articles for the Town Meeting. 

b. One to determine possible recission of a subdivision. 

c. Five on proposed subdivision. 

2. A total of 72 plans thought not to require approval were examined. 

a. 55 were endorsed. 

b. 15 were judged to require approval under the Subdivision Control Law, and therefore 

were refused endorsement. 

c. 2 were withdrawn by the applicants. 

3. Seven parking plans were submitted by the Engineering Department, and these received our 
specific recommendations. 

4. Of the eight Preliminary Subdivision plans received, one was approved, two were approved 
with conditions, and three were disapproved. 

20 



5. Of the seven Definitive Subdivision plans received, one was approved, five were approved 
with conditions, and one was disapproved. Six of these seven plans were residential. 

aas a pleasure to again have a student coming from the High School for the Planning Board. These young 
Die have something to offer in constructive ideas. A special thanks is extended to Mr. Richard Buck (now 
tudent at MIT) for his devoted work on a land use map. 

last information received on the Route 129 by-pass has the following features: 

a. The by-pass would be one-way in the northerly direction; the old Route 129 would become 

one-way in the southerly direction. 

b. Several streets will be connected through in order to provide adequate traffic circulation. 

c. All cross-overs, including the one at the railroad, will be at grade level. This will 

eliminate an unsightly "bridge" situation. 

d. The planned right-of-way appears to be 100 feet in width, with a proposed paving of 60 feet 

e. Construction will be done entirely with State funds, thus releasing the County money for 

other projects (such as sidewalks along this new stretch of road) . 



Lcations are that more physical activity should be noted on the Richmond Street bridge in the Spring of 
3. All landowners have been notified by the authorities. 




Work sessions at the Planning Board 



21 



Police Department 



OFFENSES REPORTED 
Assaults : 

Gun 

Knife 

Hands , 

Other 



Feet, Etc. 



Auto Thefts: 

Breaking & Entering: 
Forcible Entry 
No Force 
Attempts 

Homicide : 

Larcency Complaints: 
Pocket Picking 
Shoplifting 
Theft from Autos 
Theft of Auto Parts 
Theft of Bicycles 
Theft from Buildings 
Theft from Coin Machines 
All Other Thefts 

Malicious Damage: 

Prowlers : 

Robberies : 
Armed 
Unarmed 



1 

4 
6 

70 

137 



258 
37 
52 



2 
9 
19 
82 
85 
83 
1 
92 

479 

83 



10 
2 



ARRESTS 

Assault & Battery 
Arson 

Auto Theft 

Breaking & Entering 

Disorderly Conduct 

Drunk 

Juveniles 

Larceny 

Non Support 

Receiving Stolen Property 

Robbery 

Sex Offenses 

Vandalism 

Violation of Liquor Laws 
All Other Offenses 



Total 



MOTOR VEHICLE ARRESTS 
Driver's License Violations 
Endangering 

Leaving Scene After Causing Property Damage 
Operating Under the Influence 
Unregistered-Uninsured 
Speed 

Using Without Authority 
All Others 

Total 

JUVENILE CASES 



Juvenile Cases Handled by Court 
Juvenile Cases Handled Within Department 



Total 



Sex Offenses Reported: 
Rape by Force 
Indecent Exposure 
Indecent Assault 
Obscene Calls 
Obscene Literature 
Lewd & Lascivious 
All Other Offenses 



OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS 

3 Accidents Reported 

10 Accidents Reported (fatal) 

5 Bicycles Registered 

14 Firearms-Identification Cards Issued 

1 Firearms-License to Carry Permits Issued 

2 Firearm Dealer Permits Issued 
10 Summonses Delivered 

Suspensions & Revocations from Registry M/V 



22 



MISCELLANEOUS COMPLAINTS 



ion 


11 


Juvenile Problems 




1,399 


;ault & Battery 


83 


Lost and Found 




103 


•aking & Entering 


346 


Malicious Damage 




479 


lb Threats 


13 


Missing Persons Returned 




51 


ilsers Dispatched to Investigate 


8,054 


Missing Persons Still Missing 




10 


turbances 


1,954 


Prowlers 




83 


lestic Problems 


467 


Sudden Deaths 




14 


■rgencies 


493 


Suicides (attempted) 




1 


es Dispatched to 


248 




Total 


13,809 



VIOLATION OF DRUG LAWS 1972 

Arrests : 



Unlawful dispensing or distribution: 

Class C Substance L.S.D. 2 

Class D Substance Marijuana 3 

Unlawful possession of Controlled Substance: 

Class A Substance Heroin 1 

Class B Substance Amphetamine 5 

Clas:^ B Subscance Barbiturates 8 

Class C Substance L.S.D. 6 

Class D Substance Marijuana 25 

Being present where Marijuana is found: 15 

(This is no longer a crime as of July 1, 1972) 

Total 65 

Operating a Motor Vehicle while under the influence of a Drug. 2 

Samples Submitted to Department of Public Health Laboratory: 

Class A Substance Heroin 3 

Class B Substance Amphetamine & Barbiturates 32 

Class B Substance Methadone 2 

Class C Substance L.S.D. 15 

Class D Substance Marijuana 40 

Total ~92 

Total Drug Cases Investigated in 19 72 159 



first part of my report deals with statistics accumulated throughout the year, showing the many crimes and 
enses we are involved with, as well as all the other activities with which we are engaged. To the average 
son who reads these, it will be "just a report of what the Police Department did during the year".... but to 
in "the business", it represents a lot of work and quite a bit of this work under most trying and difficult 
ditions. Some of the"Highlights" of the department include such things as the new 4 and 2 work schedule, 

services of another clerk in the administration office (E.E.A. Program), and the appointment of three add- 
onal patrolmen (E.E.A. Program). 

rolmen William Sullivan and James Rooney attended the Police Academy for eight weeks (mandatory training 
gram). Detective John Harvey and Patrolman Bernard Nally attended the Firearms Instructor's Training Pro- 
m (F.B.I.) . E.E.A. Patrolmen, Ralph DeLisle, Albert Marfleet, and Roland Wood attended a Firearms Training 
ool for a week under the sponsorship of Smith & Wesson. (E.A.A. Program). Sergeant Arthur Kelley, Safety 
icer John Ritchie, Patrolmen James Cuoco, Robert LaRivee, William Sullivan, and James Rooney attended the 
rgency Medical Technical Program at the Winchester Hospital and have been awarded certificates for the suc- 
sful completion of said school. Detective Daniel Ballou, Inspector Joseph Cuoco, and Patrolman William 
livan attended the State Police Breathalyzer Training School. Detective John Harvey, and K-9 Officers 
hony Langone and Robert Shelley attended a seminar on "Attacks on Police" sponsored by the F.B.I. 



23 



Safety Officer John Ritchie has done a real good job of getting some of the Town-owned roads approved by th- 
State for speed limits. 



K-9 Officers Langone and Shelley have put on demonstrations for some local organizations, as well as out-of 
town groups. The dogs were used to good advantage last March at the time of the trouble at the Billerica 
House of Correction, and to search a large department store in Lowell for hidden culprits. 

Officer Charles Dolan's capture of the holdup man at the North Wilmington bank on June 22nd is worthy of 
special praise. "Rookie Patrolman Marfleet was credited with an "assist". 

In cooperation with our department, Wilmington Rotary Club sponsored "Operation I.D." and the Detective Bur 
started the program on March 14th. This project is most worthwhile, and we are most grateful to those who 
already taken advantage of such a good deal. We remind those who have not, that it is still available to t 
Call us. We will tell you all about it. 

Officer Joseph Cuoco's report on narcotics and drugs is included in this report, and he deserves a big vote f 
thanks for his efforts. 

Public relations are most important, and I want to report that Officer Nally was invited to speak at the me 
ing of the Youth Fellowship on February 27th, Inspector John Harvey spoke at the meeting of the Junior Squi 
on February 28th, and K-9 Officers Langone and Shelley have done their share along this line. 

Officer Lawrence Kelly retired from the department on July 28th for reasons of health. We wish him many ye 
of happy retirement. 

It is with deep sense of regret that we had to record the death of Officer Fred Ward on August 1, 1972. 

In concluding this report, may I once again thank all those who have in any way contributed or assisted the 
Wilmington Police Department in the year 1972. 

To all Department Heads and their respective crews, to the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager, to the 
Regulars, to the Specials, to the Traffic Supervisors, to the department clerks my most grateful thanks for 
your every effort. 

Once again I am going to list the numbers to use when calling the POLICE DEPARTMENT: 

Emergency: 658-3331 & 658-3332 

General Police Business: 658-5071 & 658-5072 ' 



Constable 



I herewith submit my Annual Report as Constable of the Town of Wilmington, for the year ending 1972. 

During the year 1972, I posted Notices and the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting, in accordance with tht 
By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington. 

I also posted Notice of Special Town Meeting, posted and served notices for other departments and Town 
Officers of the Town. 



Building 



inspector 









1970 






1971 






1972 




NO. 




VALUATION 


NO. 




VALUATION 


NO. 




VALUATION 


veilings (single family) 


56 


$ 


1,045,000 


93 


$ 


1,711,000 


121 


$ 


2,633,000 


esidential Garages 


11 




33,000 


15 




46,900 


15 




48,500 


dd . St Alter, (residential) 


/ 




204,100 






loo , oUU 






J-OU y UUU 






$ 


1,282,100 




c 
■? 


1 QAA son 




c 
■? 


9 Rf\^ son 


•^/liio^T""! ^ I Rill 1 /nTT^f»c? 

UUU5 LLXUl. Duxxuxngb 


Q 

D 


$ 


721,000 


D 


c 
-? 









1 fsCiix nnn 

X y DUH y UUU 


otranercial Buildings (stores) 


1 




50,000 


6 




411,350 


1 




30,000 




o 




43,000 














dd. & Alter, (non-residential) 


14 




1,633,200 


7 




374,500 


5 




255,000 


winuning Pools & Signs 


36 




77,150 


62 




122,470 








winuning Pools (1972) 














28 




70,600 


igns (1972) 














13 




10,600 


ervice Stations 


1 




50,000 














tility Buildings 


1 




10,000 


1 




30,000 








ffice Buildings 








2 




364,000 








ecreation 








1 




240,000 


1 




200,000 


heds and Barns 














4 




55,500 






$ 


2,584,350 




$ 


2,664,320 




$ 


2,225,700 


TOTAL 




$ 


3,866,450 




$ 


4,610,820 




$ 


5,087,200 


;enewals 


22 






17 






7 






lemolitions 


9 






16 


$ 


39,150 


10 


$ 


2,800 


ire Damage & Repairs 


2 






2 




3,000 


3 




14,500 


'oundations 


5 






4 




36,500 


9 




15,000 


TOTAL 


241 






305 


$ 


78,650 


285 


$ 


32,300 


JEFORT OF FEES COLLECTED AND TURNED 


OVER TO 


THE TREASURER: 














uilding Permits 


241 


$ 


4,250.00 


305 


$ 


11,357.00 


285 


$ 


12,546.50 


;as Fitting Permits 


76 




602.00 


91 




816.00 


107 




864.00 


iring Permits 


311 




2,472.95 


365 




3,811.00 


360 




3,596.50 


lumbing Permits 


110 




972.00 


161 




1,216.50 


14 7 




1,158.50 


TOTAL 


738 


$ 


8,296.95 


922 


$ 


17,200.50 


899 


$ 


18,165.50 




Engineering Department 



The year 1972 was a very busy and constructive one for the Engineering Department. Mr. Arthur E. Harding, Jr 
resigned as Town Engineer in February to assume a similar position with the Town of Sudbury. 

Much of the department's time was spent reviewing the engineering of plans for proposed construction within 
the Town. The purpose of reviewing these plans is to protect abutters and to prevent the creation of any new 
highway or drainage problems. The department also assists other town departments, boards, and committees by 
preparing plans for various projects or by making available information from our files. 

Planning Board : 

Reviewed and made recommendations of definitive and/or preliminary plans for approximately ten new subdivisi 
in town. Prepared bond estimates for the construction of roads and utilities within various new subdivision 
within the town. The Planning Board requires developers to bond the construction to insure that future prop 
owners will have a properly constructed road fronting their lot. Reviewed with the Planning Board, several 
construction site plans relative to parking requirements and site drainage. Inspected the roadway and draina 
construction within the active subdivisions. 

Selectmen : 

Prepared layout plans and legal documents for the 19 72 Annual Town Meeting for Dell Drive, Andover Street, 
Baland Road and Hopkins Street. Prepared a plan for land taking off Grove Avenue for recreational purposes. 
Compiled information and data on the Salem Street land that was taken at the Special Town Meeting for school 
purposes. Prepared a precinct map for the town. 

Conservation Commission : 

Reviewed and made recommendations on plans that were submitted in conjunction with Hatch Act hearings. Met 
with the Commission and other interested parties in discussion on the new Wetlands Protection Act. Assisted 
the Commission in preparing plans for their articles at the Annual Town Meeting. 

Highway Department : 

Prepared plans add assisted the department with the necessary surveying for the drainage and sidewalk project 
mentioned in their annual report. Prepared plans and assisted the Highway Department with the construction 
of a parking area and a new bus turn-around for the high school, tennis courts at the Wobum Street School, 
roadway construction on Baland Road and Boutwell Street. Began work on the 1973 drainage and sidewalk progrj 

Water and Sewer : 

Prepared easement plans for the Eames Street sewer. Met with the commissioners and others in discussion on 1 
new sewer assessment formula and sewer use regulations and rates. Met with the consulting engineers in disct 
sion of the next phase of the sewer program. Compiled plans and information available at our office that wi' 
aid in the design of the new sewer. 

Construction by Contract : 

Supervised the construction and figured payments to private contractors for the construction of Nichols Strei 
Bridge Approach, Sherwood Road, Englewood Drive, and Kenwood Avenue. 



26 



;sessor : 

idated the assessors' property maps to January 1, 1972, and printed copies for all town departments and 
■ivate individuals requesting them. 

;iRhborhood Youth Corps and Emergency Employment Act : 

lese are two federal sponsored programs that supplied help at no cost to the cities and towns requesting it. 
th this help we were able to set stone bounds on the boundaries of Marcia Road, Carolyn Road, Kenwood Avenue, 
iglewood Drive, Sherwood Road, Dell Drive, Patricia Circle, and Baland Road. This help supplemented our 
gular work force and enabled us to accomplish work which otherwise would not havebeen done in 1972. Also 
ider the NYC, the engineering office had a high school student as part-time clerk during the summer months. 

ate Department of Public Works : 

:t with state engineers and consultants on the proposed widening of Lowell Street from the Town line to 
■burn Street. Discussed the existing problems of the area and possible problems that may result from the 
idustrial development in North Woburn. Met with the state engineers designing the relocation of Route 129, 
ire commonly known as the "Richmond Street Bridge". Discussed various aspects of the design and wishes of 
le town. The project is scheduled to go out on bid this spring, and construction should begin early in the 
limner . 




Land surveying - Hopkins Street New well house at the Town Park 




Sidewalk construction - Woburn Street New off-street parking - Wildwood Street 



27 



Tree Department 



During the year, the Tree Department carried on its routine work of cutting, removing and trimming trees. 
The tree planting program, which started in April, proved to be very successful. There were 43 Norway Mapl. 
and 157 Schwedlers set out from the requests received. The requests for trees this year surpassed all othe 
years since this program started. Those that did not receive their trees this year, will be carried over ai 
head the list when we begin the new tree planting program. Due to the widening of streets and the sidewalk 
program, there were 114 trees removed and disposed of, with an additional 200 other roadside trees damaged 
in various parts of the town. The feeding of various trees was carried out. Tree spraying began in April 
for control of certain insects. Snow plowing was done for the Highway Department. We also assisted the 
Maintenance Department by using the Skyworker for installing lights, flag poles and putting stomn windows o; 
various schools. We received a new chassis and cab as per vote at the annual March Town Meeting. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease : 

Samples of certain trees believed to be diseased were sent to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mas 
Due to their report, 19 were dutch elm diseased and had to be removed. Stump removal is done by using the 
Tree Department's stump cutter. All roadside elm trees were sprayed with dormant spray during April. 

Moth Department : 

Spraying was done for the control of such insects as white pine weevil, tent caterpillars, European pine, I 
gypsy moth, shoot moth, spruce gall aphids, maple bladder gall, fall web worms, clinch bugs and oak skeleto 
izers. The effect of the spraying for the skeletonizers seems to have controlled them considerably. None j 
showed up in the first generation, and only a few showed up in the second generation this year. If there i 
any appearance of them in the coming year, please feel free to contact the Tree Department. There were 80 j 
hornet's and bees' nests removed as a result of calls received. ! 

Mosquitos : I 
Trapped water and bog holes were treated with liquid larvacide. This has proved to be harmless to fish, j 
animals and vegetation. The fog generator used and owned by the Tree Department, is very effective in the 
control of mosquitos. The greatest number of mosquitos are out between eight and twelve o'clock in the eve - 
ing, and during this time the fogging program is carried on. We ask all parents to bear in mind that the 
operators cannot hear above the noise of the fogger, so if they would stress to their children the dangers E 
following the fogger, we would greatly appreciate it. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year, tlj 
Town departments for the cooperation given this department, and to the men of the Tree Department for thei i 
complete cooperation and efforts for the year 1972. 



28 



Cemetery Department 



rials In 1972; 



Receipts ; 



Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elsewhere 

Non-Residents 

Babies 

Cremations 

Bodies Stored in Tomb , Buried Elsewhere 
Removal 



11 

56 
51 
7 
2 

2 
1 



Internments 
Liners Sold 



$ 4,760 
1,259 



Foundations for 
Setting Markers 
Affidavits 



Monuments 



809 
80 
32 



$ 6,940 



Reserve : 



127 



Sale of Lots 



$ 5,790 



;tion I was completed this year. Aluminum lot markers and numbers were purchased, and the area was marked 
r use. The completion of this space gives a total of forty-eight 4 grave lots, and ten 6 grave lots. One 
)usand three hundred and fifty-eight yards of loam were hauled for use in the cemetery. It was purchased 
)m Jay-Dee Builders on Salem Street. Regular routine maintenance, along with the developing of new areas, 
)t the department busy throughout the year. About one thousand aluminum markers were purchased to replace 
i old cement ones. Over three thousand tons of fill were hauled for landscaping. 

.arge red oak tree, estimated to have been over one hundred years old, was destroyed by a wind storm. A 
iber of winter graves were loamed and seeded. A six foot catch basin was built for drainage on Linden Avenue, 
this operation, the cemetery crew was assisted by the foreman of the Highway Department. The fence along 
.dwood Street was repaired twice, as it was damaged by automobiles sliding off the road. A new 1972 Inter- 
.ional three-quarter ton truck with utility body was purchased to replace the 1958 Ford truck. Rubbish 
rrels at the Cemetery, Common, Beaches and Town Park were emptied weekly. The Department assisted the high- 
' crew with snow removal. 

I employees were called to work at the surplus food center each month. Five boys, sponsored by the Neigh- 
"hood Youth Corps, were utilized to scrape and paint the cemetery fences and a girl, sponsored by the Corps, 
iisted with clerical work. 

t finish coat of hot top was applied to the roadway at the Town Park. The project will be completed in 1973. 
"ee hundred and twenty feet of hot top curbing was installed to prevent drainage water from running onto the 
•Id. Loam was hauled to grade in back of the curbing. The Softball diamond was refurbished because of some 
ihout by heavy rains. Four used light poles were set. A light will be installed at the entrance to the 
|"k and one in the lower parking lot. The ball field was dragged, seeded and rolled. 

! fence around the parking lot at the beach area was painted. The entire area was raked and cleared of 

|iss, rubbish and debris in readiness for the beach opening. Clean barrels were purchased for the life lines. 

|ks were welded onto them and painted. 

plaque at Lubbers Brook on Main Street was replaced. Vandals destroyed the one previously installed. The 
terworth plaque, damaged by a car, was repaired and put back in place. The rope on the common flag pole 
replaced three times due to vandalism. 



conclusion, I extend sincere thanks to all Town Officials and Employees for their assistance during the 
r 1972. 

29 




Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried on during the year, such as patching streets, cleaning 
catch basins, sweeping streets, erection of street signs, replacing guard rails, painting guard rail posts, e 

Sidwalk Program : 

Sidewalks were constructed on Salem Street from Woburn Street approximately 1700', and Boutwell Street from 
Taft Road to Aldrich Road. A pedway from Glen Road School to Cunningham Street was constructed so the childi 
walking to school in that area would not have to use Glen Road. All slope work, loam and seeding was done, 
completing the following for our 1971 sidewalk program: Shawsheen Avenue from Grace Drive to Wilton Drive, 
Wobum Street from Park Street to Sheridan Road, and Boutwell Street from school driveway to Taft Road, and 
we also put finish hot top on this section. Sidewalk was constructed at intersection of Hopkins Street and 
Shawsheen Avenue. Cut trees and graveled a sidewalk from Wildwood Street to Lowell Street. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance : 

The monies were spent for hot top on Burlington Avenue from Deming Way to Boutwell Street. Also we used son 
of hot top monies from the Highway expense account to complete this project. 

Chapter 81 Maintenance : 

The following streets were resurfaced all or in part: Park Street, West Street, Butters Row, Forest Street,] 
Aldrich Road, Glen Road, Lincoln Street, King Street, Linda Road, Longview Road, Pineridge Road, Pershing 
Street, Pinewood Road, Chestnut Street, Hillside Way, Auburn Avenue, Fairfield Avenue, Faulkner Avenue, Lloy| 
Road, Davis Road, Lockwood Road, Liberty Street, Marjorie Road, Morse Avenue, Oakwood Road, Royal Street and 
Washington Avenue. 



Chapter 90 Construction : 

Put finish hot top on Andover Street and installed curbing. 



All slope work was completed. 



Hot Top Program : 

This money comes from the Highway Department expense account. We hot topped Boutwell Street from Taft Road 
Aldrich Road, Baland Road, Brand Avenue, and Fames Street from Main Street to Greer's driveway. Installed 
curbing on Adams Street and Middlesex Avenue common side. 

Buildings Removed : 

With the aid of an outside contractor, we removed the old D.A.V. Hall on Grove Avenue after it was partiall; 
destroyed by fire and deemed a hazard. 

Drainage : 

We eliminated the following drainage problems: Installed drainage system on Baland Road, Williams Avenue, 
Jones Avenue, Lake Street, South Street, Shawsheen Avenue school grounds, Upton Court, Shawsheen Avenue fr i 
Ferguson Road to Carter Lane, Kirk Street, Salem Street near Anthony Avenue, and Middlesex Avenue. Culvert 
replaced: Railroad Avenue, Chestnut Street, Andover Street and Cunningham Street. Catch basins installed: 
Glen Road, Dobson Avenue, Taft Road, and Salem Street. Although we eliminated many drainage problems in 19 
there are still many more existing problems. 



30 



;an-up Pick-up Campaign ; 

i annual clean-up pick-up campaign was conducted in April. We received over 850 calls for pick-up. 
jroximately 400 truck loads were hauled to the Town Dump. 

idside Pick-up : 

LS program is sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce and the students. A lot of credit should be given to 

; students participating in this program, picking up roadside litter and bagging it. The Highway Department 

iisted by hauling approximately twenty loads to the Town Dump. 

)W and Ice : 

)W and ice removal still remains a major and very expensive problem. 
lipment ; 

; mechanics, foreman and I have checked over the equipment and sincerely conclude we must replace 4 dump 
icks and 3 sander bodies. 

loks and Streams Maintenance : 

.s year with the added personnel from the E.E.A and N.Y.C., Federal sponsored programs, we were able to 
irt a program of brook and stream maintenance which was desperately needed. 

rsonnel : 

: to the N.Y.C., Federal sponsored program, the clerk had the assistance of two high school students during 
; summer months. As per vote at the Annual Town Meeting, a mechanic was added to the personnel. 

concluding this report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the various departments for 
;ir help, especially during snow storms. To the Tree Department,' a special thanks for their help in removing 
;es for sidewalk construction. To the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout 
; year. To the men of the Highway Department who made 1972 a very productive year, my sincere thanks and 
)reciation. 




Sidewalk construction - Boutwell Street Drainage construction - Shawsheen Avenue 



31 



Public Buildings & Grounds Dept. 



1972 has been a year of change in the Public Buildings and Grounds Department. Mr. Charles Steeves was 
appointed Assistant Superintendent in charge of Maintenance, and Mr. Noah Denault was appointed Assistant 
Superintendent in charge of Custodians. Mr. Frederick Jaeschke left Wilmington to join the Wellesley school 
department, and Mr. Roy P. McClanahan was appointed Superintendent of Public Buildings and Grounds. Also 
the department employed a full-time electrician resulting in more efficient service to the town. 

The interiors of the Police Station, High School, Walker School, Curriculum Center, Woburn Street and Fire 
Station were painted in 1972, as was the exteriors of the Buzzell School, Bath House, Town Hall and portions 
of the Maintenance Shop and Roman House. 

A boiler has been installed at the Curriculum Center and new piping at the Buzzell School. Boiler automatic 
fills and low water cut-offs have been overhauled and repaired. Various repairs caused by vandalism to toile 
facilities and sewer ejector pumps have been accomplished. Heating systems have been serviced as needed. 

Chains have been installed across folding cafeteria tables at the Boutwell, Shawsheen, Wildwood, Glen Road 
and Wobum Street Schools. These chains prevent the tables from falling away from the wall. 

The tennis courts have been refinished with a green acrylic coating resulting in a better and longer wearing 
playing surface. Also the courts were flooded during the winter months for use by skaters. 

A great deal of time was spent programming and preparing the voting machines for the primary and general 
elections as well as setting up the High School gymnasium for town meetings and elections. 

Eight thousand dollars was spent by the department to repair vandalism in 1972. Five hundred and forty-one 
windows had to be replaced this year. Ten thousand dollars has been budgeted in this account for 1973. 

My thanks to all personnel of the Public Buildings and Grounds Department for their cooperation during the 
transition period. The assistance received from other departments and boards during 1972 is also greatly 
appreciated. 



32 







The high cost of vandalism In public buildings 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



: list of weighing and measuring devices, meters, and weights sealed and condemned during the year 1972 is 
follows: 





Adj us ted 


Lances, Scales and Weights 


42 


iacity Measures 


12 


^uid Measuring Meters 


56 


ler Measuring Devices 


12 


weighing of Prepackaged Foods 


1,950 



Sealed 
141 
34 
161 
28 



Not Sealed 
22 
12 
11 
9 



Condemned 
29 
14 
16 
11 



33 



Library Trustees 



The Library Trustees, in compliance with their obligation to evaluate the happenings of the past year, hereby 
submit the following annual report for the year 1972. At the outset, let it be known that this report is a 
supplement to the excellent report provided by our director, Mr. Meriam and as such will be essentially re- 
stricted to matters relating to the functions of the trustees. 

During the past year, a valuable member of the board for many years, Mr. Albert Blackburn, resigned due to 
his transfer out of state. His many hours of dedication relative to the construction of the new library will 
long be remembered and appreciated. Needless to say, we will miss the experience and leadership which he 
provided the Board. Likewise, the trustees would like to express their personal loss and regret over the 
death of their beloved past librarian, Mrs. Clara M. Chipman. I suspect that most of the community were un- 
aware of the fact that after her retirement from active service, she responded upon two different occasions 
to answer the call of the trustees to take over the reins of the library pending the appointment of a new 
director. In honor of her dedication and service, the trustees voted to name the historical room in her hone 
and as such it is now known as the Clara M. Chipman Historical Room. 

The year 1972 has been a good year for the library. Under the direction of an excellent staff, it has been 
a year of steady growth and progress. Essentially, the trustees are charged with the responsibility of over- 
all policy in defining the goals and direction in which the library proceeds. Under the consistent excellent 
leadership of the director, particular emphasis was placed on the growth and enlargement of the Reference 
Department. This was accomplished by obtaining the services of a full time reference librarian, as well as i 
additional procurement of books, materials and equipment. Our only regret appears to be our inability to proj 
claim to the community as a whole what a gold mine of collective reference material is at their finger tips 
and available for their asking. 

In the forthcoming year, it will be the goal of the trustees and staff to place special emphasis on the I 
Childrens' Department. We anticipate that the plans outlined will be of great importance in the continued 
growth and enlargement of this very important department. 

The Board of Trustees, in conjunction with the request of the Town Manager, has formulated and adopted a set 
of rules and regulations governing their duties as well as organizational procedures. Copies are available 
at the Town Hall and/or Library. 

In conclusion, the trustees are proud of the library as an institution and more particularly of its staff of 
loyal and dedicated Town employees. We sincerely welcome constructive suggestions and/or complaints con- 
cerning both policy making decisions as well as administrative practices of the library, but most of all, we 
sincerely hope that the assessment of the trustees relative to the progressive growth of the library, is 
shared by the community as a whole. 



34 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



American Library Association Form 



Library: 

Town and State: 

Library Director: 

Date of Founding: 

Population: (1970 census) 

Number of Agencies: 

Number of days ooen during the year: 
Hours open each week: 

Number of volumes beginning of the year 1971: 
Number of volumes purchased during the year: 
Number of volumes added as gifts: 
Number of volumes withdrawn during the year: 
Number of volumes as of December 31, 1972: 
Recordings : 
Newspapers : 
Periodicals : 

Circulation: Adult: 51,672 Children: 32,980 

Circulation per Capita: 

Appropriations and Income; 

Per Capita Expenditures: 

Reference Questions: 

Interlibrary Loans: 

Requests from other libraries: 

Received from other libraries: 
Circulation Figures: 

1967 

1968 

1969 

1970 

1971 

1972 



Wilmington Memorial Library 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 

Philip W. Meriam 

1871 

17,102 

Main Library 

301 

69 

40,098 
3,821 
69 
748 

43,240 
1,114 
15 
167 

84,652 
4.95 

$101,333 

$5.74 

2,519 



218 

82,202 
89,390 
95,079 
98,298 
93,750 
84,652 




Wllmxngton Crusaaers - Memorial Day Parade 



35 



Librarian 



The Memorial Library entered its second century of library service to the town without fanfare. Throughout 
the year emphasis has been placed on evaluating the reference collection and acquiring new reference material 
A record was kept of the number of informational requests, and 2,519 were recorded. Patrons sought answers 
to questions ranging from the name of Christopher Columbus's dog to the demographic composition of the town, 
and "if the ice was safe on the tennis court rink". Others ranged from natural foods, women's liberation, 
chess gambits, report card evaluations, hockey camps, accredited schools of civil engineering, no-fault j 
insurance, and the Loch Ness monster. | 

Despite increased student use and increased reference activity, overall circulation declined from its peak 
of 1970, when it achieved a high of 98,298. Over a period of two years, a loss of 13,646 in general circula- 
tion has been experienced. The total circulation for 1972 was 84,652 or 51,672 for adults, and 32,980 for 
the children's department. Children's circulation experienced a gain, and the loss of circulation was ex- 
perienced in the adult department. This loss can be attributed to several factors: the novelty of the new 
building had worn off, and its use experienced normal stabilization. While population characterists did not I 
change drastically, use of leisure time underwent various changes affecting the use of the public library. 
Television and the pursuit of outside interests had their impact on overall circulation. The various changes 
within the publishing industry itself also made their impact. Frequently new books did not respond to public 
tastes and interest, therefore reading habits changed as a result. Publishing fads, e.g., ecology, women's 
liberation, the common cold, etc. flooded the book trade and were overly promoted. The public in search of 
leisure reading, it appears, did not attempt to keep up with the latest fads. Unfortunately, increased 
student use of the library did not increase circulation to a marked degree. Some adults, unfortunately and 
perhaps unfairly, felt the library had been "taken over" by the student so curtailed their patronage. All 
of these factors pose a paradox: circulation declined, but at the same time, activity was never greater. 

An effort was made to maintain the balance between "informational" and "recreational" needs. The popular 
collection was expanded by the McNaughton Plan with the service providing multiple copies of the most popula 
fiction and non-fiction with the positive benefit of reducing the "reserve list". Popular titles are readil 
available for both adults and young adults. Current best sellers were also introduced in easy-to-read large 
print for the visually handicapped. The Government Documents Program was revised to better serve the needs 
of the patrons, and the business and legal services were expanded. The college catalog collection was furth 
developed and the pamphlet file was enlarged. Many titles were purchased for the essay index. When space w 
available, book reviews were printed in the Town Crier. Another area of popular interest has been the gradu 
development of a cassette tape library. Chess was played vigorously throughout the library. 

The library's relationship with the Wilmington Schools took many forms ranging from participation in Student 
Government Day to specially arranged class room visits, reserve collections, and assisting in an evaluation 
of the school system required by the Board of Education of the Commonwealth. The Library participated in th 
Open Campus Program, and enjoyed cooperative and amiable relations with Mr. John Lynch of the Wilmington 
School Department in coordinating the student use of the libary with the various people involved. 

The contemporary image of library service was reflected in children's work. Pre-school story hours were he] 
throughout the year, and during the summer we were fortunate to have the services of Mrs. Arlene Ten Dyck, i . 
professional nursery school teacher, who ran a special program for four and five year olds. Programs for 
older children included several film series, reading programs, a puppet club, and concluded with a lively 
Christmas arts and crafts session. ' 

36 



hool visits were regularly scheduled with over twenty class visits per month conducted throughout the school 
ar. Special field trips were also arranged for research and library instruction, and the children's libra- 
an was a guest speaker at the High School in the fall. Two special book, displays celebrated International 
ok Year. Through the cooperation of the Wilmington School system's art department, the children's room was 
ightened by art work from all the schools. 

special collection for adults of books on children's literature and early childhood was begun. A special 
bliography was prepared on pre-school books. A new collection of educational games and toys was very heavily 
ed. Story hours and pre-school programs achieved new dimensions with the use of filmstrips; and through the 
operation of the Director of the Wilmington School system's audio-visual department, a program was initiated 
ich provided the nucleus of a tape cassette collection. 

e conference room of the Memorial Library experienced increased usage by Senior Citizen's groups, the 
ddlesex County Extension Service, the Wilmington Association for Children with Learning Disabilities, the 
Lomon Mental Health Center, Family Counseling Service, the Wilmington Women's Club, League of Women Voters, 
awsheen Watershed Association, The Greater Boston Library Administrators and various town and civic 
ganizations . 

3 Library Director acknowledges with thanks the job performed by the entire staff. Miss Susan MacDonald 
pt the wheels turning in the acquisitions department, Mrs. Barbara White served as a "gal Friday" in all 
partments, and Mrs. Beatrice Yankowski adroitly maintained business and legal services and the periodical 
llection. Their willingness to serve, and their handling of "the nuts and bolts" of the daily operation 
serve recognition. The color, activity, and quality of children's services is due to Mrs. Sara Rueter. 
many, the library is Mrs. Janet Small, who serves as circulation librarian. To many behind-the-scenes, the 
jrary is Mrs. Louise Balser, who by necessity wears many hats - cataloger, secretary, chief accountant, and 
in necessary, acting-director. A special note of appreciation to these three ladies for their gracious 
distance and dedication. 

J late Mrs. Laura Currier Morrison, the South Branch of the Ladies Benevolent Society of the Wilmington 
igregational Church in memory of Mrs. Alice Bischoff, the Wilmington Women's Club, Mrs. Waive M. Drew, 
i. Elizabeth Andrews, Mrs. Norma Weston, Mrs. Hollis Holland, Mrs. Marilyn Weinberg, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Ballou 
memory of Barry Phillips, and Mr. Philip Andrews donated gifts to the Memorial Library, and their support is 
)reciated. 

; support and contributions of Mr. Sterling Morris, the Town Manager, and other town officials are grate- 
-ly acknowledged. The Library Director also wishes to attempt an expression of appreciation to the Board 
Library Trustees for their efforts in making the library a more effective community agency. 

'2 was a year of loss due to the death of Mrs. Clara P. Chipman, librarian-emeritus. 1972 was a year of 
itinuation, and yet still one of expanded service in the area of reference and informational services. It 
i a year of new beginnings, but not a year of dramatic change. 1973 promises to be a year of natural evolu- 
)nary development and progress. 




Finance Committee in session 



Tri-Town meeting of Conservation Committees 



37 




Water & Sewer Commissioners 



For your review your Water and Sewer Commissioners present the following data relative to the operation of 
that department: 



WATER SUPPLY 1968 1969 

Maximum Gallons 3,853,200 5,177,000 

Pumped per Day 

Maximum Gallons 19,938,400 27,125,000 

Pumped per Week 

Maximum Gallons 83,369,800 95,320,000 

Pumped per Month 

Average Gallons 2,348,000 2,530,300 

per Day 

Average Gallons 74,419,125 76,963,675 

per Month 

Total Gallons 857,029,500 923,564,100 

per Year 

MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION 

New Services Installed 107 
Total Active Services 4,477 



1970 
4,747,000 

25,712,000 

95,302,000 

2,583,000 

78,549,000 

942,598,000 



1971 

4,647,000 

26,297,000 
94,268,000 
2,530,000 
76,973,000 
923,678,000 



1972 
3,796,0 

■21, 765, C 

89, 097, C 

2,484,/ 

75,569,1 

906,833, 



New Meters Installed 107 
New Hydrants Installed 10 



Items of interest concerning the Water Department per se are listed briefly for quick perusal: 

During 1972 builders and contractors added an additional 3,550 feet of 10" pipe to the system: 950 feet on 
Scaltrito Drive, 2600 feet in Corum Meadows. The Water Department- itself contributed to the improvement of 
the total system by installing 700 feet of 6" pipe on the following streets: Burt Road, Canal Street and 
Hillcrest Road. By so doing, old 2" pipe and other inadequate installations were eliminated and the systeE 
thereby upgraded. As time and money permit your Commissioners and the department are committed to the tast 
of replacing 2" mains which have become a source of concern, and as such, a nuisance. Of immediate import; 
in this respect is the replacement of the jerry-built main on Silverlake Avenue. Other streets to receive I 
attention are Burnap Street, Kirk Street and Ferguson Road. 

Acts of vandalism were not as prevalent in 1972 as in previous years. However, considerable damage was in 
flicted upon the Salem Street station. 

A permanent pumping station was erected at the Town Park wellfield. Contracts for the project were awarde 
to the low bidder, Carmen Construction Company of North Hampton, New Hampshire - $15,200. 

38 



e year 1972 witnessed several new subdivisions, plans of which were presented to the Board for recommendation 
d approval relative to water mains: Corum Meadows, Melzar Park, Lucaya Estates, Glen Acres Estates, Cormier 
rk, and Elmwood Village. 

creased growth in the town coupled with projected water needs have prompted a search for additional sources 

supply. It becomes increasingly evident that while an adequate supply is available, the quality may not 
ly leave much to be desired but also the treatment of these supplies can very well mean the addition of 
3tly treatment facilities. Several new sites are being explored and other sites are being considered. 

in flushing policies and procedures are continuing in an attempt to alleviate scattered rusty water complaints. 

the recommendation of the Town Manager the Board, after some research, authored, discussed and adopted for- 

I procedures for the conducting of weekly meetings of the Water and Sewer Commissioners. 

rly in the spring negotiations between the respective Water Commissioners of the Towns of Wilmington and 
rlington were initiated concerning the proposed sale of Wilmington water to Burlington. Agreement followed 
ese talks whereby water would be sold in the case of an emergency on an availability basis. This action 
uld give an assist to Burlington during a tenuous period prior to the completion of its new reservoir. 

computerized study of the system was undertaken by the consulting engineers of Whitman and Howard to assess 
th immediate and long range needs. Circulatory problems, storage facilities, and expansion priorities were 
esented and discussed. Money being a factor, tentative proposals regarding these items are being studied. 

WER 

e initial stage of the Sil/er Lake Sewer Interceptor being completed and made operational has prompted 
nsideration for subsequent stages. For your review the following items of interest are being presented: 

asideration of the Silver Lake Sewer Extension involves these factors: 

a. Relief for the Silver Lake area per se. 

b. Offering a branch line for the proposed high school. 

c. Alleviating the very serious sewerage problems confronting the Charles River Breeding Laboratories. 

(Here, the earliest possible date for any relief has been projected as 1976). 

d. Providing sewerage facilities to the northeast industrial area. 

a sewer assessment policies governing Phase I of the Silver Lake Sewer Interceptor were formulated and 
apted. Each abutter would be assessed by using the formula of $2.50 per front foot plus $ .035 per square 
3t of area. A public hearing was conducted on November 16, 1972 in the conference room of the Library 
icerning the assessment policy. Of the many possible procedures that could have been adopted with respect 
sewer assessment both the Town Manager and the Board felt that the formula presented was the most equitable. 

1972 the sewer use rate was revised in order to conform with Federal Government suggestions. Now the rate 

II be $ .20 per 100 cubic feet of water used. 

3 additional pieces of internal legislation were adopted: 

1. Rules and Regulations governing sewer use and accompanying applications, one for residential/ 
commercial building sewers, the other for industrial sewer connections. 

2. Regulations for licensing drainlayers. 

lelegation representing the Tewksbury Sewer Commissioners made an inquiry concerning the feasibility of the 
-ver Lake area joining with Tewksbury in the proposed Lowell Sewerage Treatment plan. It was felt that 
:tle or no immediate benefit could accrue as far as the total plan for Wilmington is concerned. 



39 




Conservation Commission 



In 19 72 the Wilmington Conservation Commission has continued its programs of Land Acquisition and Improvemen 
Public Education, and Environmental Protection. 

LAND ACQUISITION AND IMPROVEMENT 

Despite the lack of funds allocated for land acquisition and improvements, the following advances in this ar 
have been as follows: 

1. The purchase of over 12 acres of land, containing a 3-acre cranberry bog, this parcel is adjacent tj 
the Glen Road School and Lubbers Brook flows through the center of the area. The Conservation Com- 
mission applied to the State for 'Self-Help Funds' and received $10,000, which amounted to half of ' 
the purchase price. 

2. A 1 1/A-acre parcel was also purchased for $1,000 at the end of Westdale Avenue. Our Commission wi 
the assistance of interested neighbors intend to create a 'Neighborhood Park' on this site in 1973. 

3. An additional 44 acres of land was also acquired at no cost, mainly through cooperation with the | 
Planning Board and donations by private owners. 

4. The land improvement and gravel pit reclamation program at Appolo Park in North Wilmington was con- 
tinued. The Park has been loamed, graded, and seeded with grass and wildflowers. Our Commission 
would like to thank Brodie, Inc. of Woburn for it's donation of labor and equipment and also the 
Highway and Fire Departments. Thanks also to families and friends of Commission members who assislfi 
us in raking and seeding the area. 

5. In the Glen Road cranberry bog area, a foot bridge over Lubbers Brook was constructed by the Com- 
mission with the purpose of giving the Glen Road school children a safer path to school than walki; 
on Glen Road. Many thanks to Walpole Woodworking Company for their donation of cedar posts and ra 

6. Commission members participated in the spring roadside cleanup campaign and also cleaned sections 
Lubbers Brook throughout the year. 

PUBLIC EDUCATION 

In the field of public education, our Commission continued its policy of stressing the importance of censer 
vation programs and of the need for man to preserve and improve, rather than destroy, the environment upon 
which we and all other species of life must depend for our future existence. Some of the more important ac 
complishments in this program were as follows: 

1. A large number of books related to conservation were presented to the Wilmington Memorial Library, i 

2. The cost of sending three boys to the Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp for two weeks was paj 
for by the Commission. 

40 



3. 



A campaign to educate the citizens to the vital necessity of adopting Flood Plain Zoning was carried 
out by means of slide shows, coffee hours and newspaper articles. Our Commission would like to 
thank the Wilmington League of Women Voters for their assistance in this effort. 



4. A tree planting program was carried out on Arbor Day at the Walker and Whitfield Schools. We would 
like to thank the Wilmington Tree Department for their assistance. 

5. Preliminary plans have been undertaken for the construction of a nature trail and outdoor classroom 
behind the Glen Road School. 

JVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION 

icent legislative changes have greatly increased the responsibilities and work load for local conservation 
)mmissions in the field of environmental protection. 

1. Amendments to the Hatch Act and the Wetlands Protection Act have given the Conservation Commission 
the responsibility of administering these laws, the holding of public hearings and of writing the 
'Order of Conditions' which regulate and control the indiscriminate filling of wetlands. This has 
taken many added hours of the Commission's time. 

2. At the March 19 72 Town Meeting, the long needed Flood Plain Zone articles were approved overwhelm- 
ingly by the voters. Work started almost immediately to map and define the flood plain of the Ipswich 
River. Our Commission intends to submit this article in March, 19 73. 

3. All citizens' complaints of flooding, improper drainage and pollution were acted upon or referred to 
proper authorities. The cooperation of the Engineering Department, Board of Health and Town Manager 
was excellent. 

4. The Commission worked with and consulted with many other boards and commissions in attempting to 
gain more effective and speedy accomplishments of common goals. 

5. The Commission members attended many educational seminars in 1972, thereby better educating themselves 
and improving their knowledge in order to more effectively deal with the Town's environmental prob- 
lems. The most noteworthy of these was the eight week course on 'Open Space and Recreational Plan- 
ning' at Tufts University. 

6. A joint meeting with representatives of the North Reading and Reading Conservation Commissions was 
held to discuss the common problem of encroachment on the Ipswich River next to Route 93. 

conclude our report on the programs initiated and carried on in 1972, we would like to say to all the 
tizens of Wilmington that we are not entirely satisfied with our achievements. Only through the efforts of 
1 the people and officials can a wholly satisfactory program of conservation be carried on. A much greater 
rtion of our vanishing open lands must be acquired now. It is far more economical to preserve and protect 
en space than it is to attempt to repair the damage caused by man's unthinking and often callous inroads 
to the delicate ecological balance of our Town. Our thanks to all who have helped us, and we welcome those 

you who are concerned to contact any Conunission member for more information about our future programs. 




Bridge construction on conservation land Waste Disposal discussion 



41 



Recreation Department 



The Recreation Department, in only its second year with a full time director, is continually expanding its 
effectiveness in providing all Wilmington residents with worthwhile leisure activities. Much credit should 
go to those who volunteer their time and resources for the department's functions and to those town depart- 
ments and organizations from which cooperation is essential. 

The Recreation Commission is pleased to report to the Town of Wilmington on the following 1972 activities: 
YOUTH PROGRAMS 

1. Summer Playgrounds : Seven school locations served as sites for our eight week playground program. 
Two leaders plus a Neighborhood Youth Corps aide were in charge of each playground. Boys and girls 
between the ages of 6 and 18 participated in activities such as arts & crafts, drama, nature, spor 
and games, music and special events such as trips to the New England Aquarium, Canobie Lake, Long 1 
Beach, Red Sox Game and Benson's Wild Animal Farm. Other special events included tournaments, int! 
playground competition, first Annual Playground Beach Day, first Annual Soap Box Derby, Olympic Da 
and Family Picnic Nights. ^ 

2. Special Children's Program : This program, which is 50% reimbursable through the State Division of 
Special Education, is offered to those children of Wilmington who have a learning or physical de- 
ficiency. The winter program operates out of the North Intermediate School on Saturday mornings 
while the summer playground program operates out of the Swain School, Over 40 youngsters have bee 
involved in this special program which offers: games, music, drama, arts & crafts, tournaments, 
physical development and special events. During the summer, field trips were offered weekly, as 
were swimming lessons at private pools in town. Free transportation to and from the playground wed 
provided by Mr. Fred Cain with the donation of two station wagons. Progress reports were given tcl 
the parents at the close of the summer program. I 

3. Elementary Open Gyms : The Wildwood, Woburn and Shawsheen School Gyms are utilized every Saturday 
morning from January through March. Grades 1 to 3 are scheduled for 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. while 
those in grades 4 through 6 have between 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon. Activities include active gar 
such as b asketball, street hockey and gymnastics. 

4. Flag Football : The Boys' Flag Football League is run by volunteers who devote much time to the 
promotion of this active sport. The program for boys ages 9 thru 12 plays its games under the li: 
at the Town Park every Monday evening from September to October. Participants, coaches and famil 
were treated to an Awards Night following the completion of the season. 

5. Soccer : Wilmington's entry in the Boston Area Youth Soccer League won the Division Championship 
1972. The team was coached by volunteers and was comprised of those boys ages 16 and under. Gam« 
were played against towns in the area on Sunday afternoons from March through May. A week long 
clinic in the summer was offered to boys under 14 to promote further interest in this great spect 
sport. 



42 



6. Baseball : The Recreation Department again sponsored a team of boys ages 16 thru 18, who participated 
in the summer Northeast League. New uniforms were purchased through donations of interested towns- 
people. The team was coached and managed by volunteers who are Physical Education majors in college 
and who wish to coach for a school system in the future. 

7. Softball : A girls' league for those 13 and over, and boys' league for those 13 to 17 were formed in 
June. The boys scheduled their games for the Little League field while the girls played behind the 
Glen Road School. 

8. Co-Recreation : This program utilizes both the North and West Intermediate School Gyms on Friday eve- 
nings during the winter months. Activities include games, basketball, street hockey, volley ball, 
tumbling and music. 

9. Girls Basketball : Girls ages 13 and up compete every Saturday morning at the High School Gym from 
January through March. Instruction on fundamentals is given before girls are divided into teams for 
league play. 

10. Golf : During the summer months, golf lessons and play were held at the Garden of Eden Golf Course 
on Thursday mornings at a reduced rate. This program was utilized by those boys and girls ages 12 
and over. 

11. Tennis : Instruction and tournament play were held in September and October at the High School 

and Shawsheen Courts. Doubles and singles play were available for all ages. Trophies were awarded 
to division winners. 

12. Santa's Workshop : This new program achieved more success than what was expected in the planning 
stages. The Recreation Department used St. Dorothy's Church Annex on Main Street for the workshop 
which was open evenings during the week of December 11 thru 15 and all day Saturday, December 16. 
The building was transformed into a Winter Wonderland with decorations throughout. Santa arrived by 
fire engine for the grand opening on Monday evening. Over 400 youngsters came to the workshop to 
see Santa and his elves busy making toys for Christmas joy. Pictures were available for those who 
wished to sit on Santa's lap and give him their Christmas wishes. Due to the response of this pro- 
gram, further expansion is planned for next Christmas. 

13. Children's Films : Films for children were held at the public library every Wednesday afternoon from 
March to June. Grades 1 to 6 enjoyed these weekly films. 

14. Town Beach : Although all ages used the beach facilities during the summer months, many youths took 
advantage of the swimming lessons, as over 50 Red Cross Certificates were isued after course com- 
pletion. 

15. Baske tball : The Wilmington Recreation Basketball League is offered to boys ages 9 and over and runs 
from December through March. Over 150 boys participate annually in this league. Games are held 
Wednesday evenings, Saturday afternoons and Sunday evenings. A clinic was conducted by Mr. Don Nelson 
of the Boston Celtics at the High School Gym in November. In December members of the league went to 
Celtics Clinic and game at the Boston Garden. After the completion of the season an invitational 
tournament was held. 

16. Others : Other activities sponsored or co-sponsored by the Recreation Department included: street 
hockey leagues, movies, games nights, field trips, run-punt-pass and kick contest, media center, ping 
pong, dances, ski trips, horribles parade, arts & crafts program, vacation programs, and Easter egg 
hunt. 

| JLT PROGRAMS 

1. Men ' s Open Gym : This program provides those over 18, who wish to participate in physical exercise, 
I a chance to engage in a team or individual activity of their choice. The program operates from 

I December to March on Saturday evenings at the High School Gym. 

2. Bridge : Lessons in beginner and intermediate bridge are offered from March to May on a weekly basis. 
A basic charge of $10.00 for 10 weeks' instruction is in effect. 



43 



3. Self Defense : This new program is offered on Wednesday evenings from January to March at the North 
Intermediate School Gym. Classes are held separately for males and females. Those ages 13 and ove 
are eligible for participation in these classes. 

4. Ladies Slimnastics : This Thursday evening course is offered to ladies 18 and over at the High Scho 
Gym from January to March. Ladies may participate in group or individual exercise of their choice. 

5. Golf ; Indoor golf lessons are provided on Thursday evenings at the High School Gym from January to 
March for those who are 15 and over. 

6. Memorial Day Marathon : Every year more and more people show up for the marathon which starts and e 
at the Town Park. Trophies are provided for the winners. 

7. Co-Ed Volleyball : On Tuesday evenings at the High School Gym during the winter, adults may partici 
in league or informal co-ed volleyball. 

8. Town League Basketball : The adult division of the Recreation League competes on Saturdays and Sunc 
during the winter at the High School. 

9. Theater Group : The Wilmington "Spotlighters" Theater Group performed "Three One Act Plays" at the 
High School Auditorium in April. In November the group put on a Theater-Dinner-Dance at the Casa c 
Fior which was well received. 

10. Men's Softball : During the summer the Men's Recreation Softball League utilized the Town Park foui 
evenings a week. This slo-pitch league was well organized and received. 

SENIOR CITIZENS 

Increased emphasis has been put on Senior Citizen's activities as this age group is becoming larger anc 
more receptive to program activities. The Recreation Program Assistant, employed through the Emergency 
Employment Act, has been working with the elderly in Wilmington in hopes of providing better leisure t: 
services to these people. Activities provided have been: knitting for the needy, movies, buffet lunch- 
fashion show, blitz parties, flower making, arts & crafts, picnics, trips to Cathedral of the Pines, 
Christmas lights trip, shopping trips. Thanksgiving Dinner, Christmas Party and Your Town and You. 

The Recreation Commission appropriates funds through its budget to Community Youth Organizations such as Po] 
Warner, Little League, Pony League, Youth Hockey and Figure Skating. These fine organizations deserve much 
credit for their tireless efforts in bringing recreational activities to the youth of Wilmington. 

The Recreation Commission wishes to extend its thanks and sincere expression of gratitude to those public ai 
private organizations who contributed so much to the town in helping enhance the recreation picture in 
Wilmington. 




Fie eating contest at Sweetheart Plastics 



44 



Redevelopment Authority 



ring the year of 1972, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority has been engaged in fulfilling the many legal 
quirements pursuant to the eminent domain taking of the Redevelopment Project land on Eames Street. As 
quired under the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 121, the Authority's attorney, Mr. J. W. McCann, 
npiled a list of all the known owners and their present adjiresses. Using the 1971 appraisal, and an earlier 
araisal which the Authority was required to have made during the initial planning stages, purchase offering 
Lees for each parcel were established and sent to the Massachusetts Department of Community Affairs, Division 
Urban Renewal for their concurrence and approval. Their approval was received in June, and the Authority 
jceeded to send to each known private property owner a notice that the Authority intended to acquire their 
jperty under eminent domain procedure, and stating the price the Authority could offer. Further, the owners 
:e invited to visit with the Authority to discuss the project and to answer any questions they might have 
jarding the land taking. Offers were sent to the owners by the Authority with most of them replying, 
;epting the Authority's offer without further meetings. A few of the offers were accepted after a meeting 
;h the Authority, and some of the owners did not reply. 

January, 1973, the Authority will file the necessary legal documents with the North Middlesex Registry of 
ids in Lowell, and become owners of the land on Eames Street. Approximately 27 acres of the project land is 
' for sale to an individual industry or to an industrial developer. 

■ Wilmington Industrial Development Commission has offered to assist the Redevelopment Authority in the sale 
the land, and that offer was accepted by the Authority. It is the intention of the Authority to turn over 
the Town, for conservation or other town purposes, the remaining area of the project, after provisions for 
ess to the homes located in this area has been provided. A portion of the Redevelopment Project land along 
Wilmington-Woburn line is presently zoned Single Residence "A". This land is surrounded on three sides by 
ustrially-zoned land, and on the fourth side by the proposed conservation land. In order for this land to 
made available as part of the industrial land offered for sale, the Authority will present an article at the 
ual Town Meeting in March, 1973, requesting that this "SRA" area be rezoned to "Industrial." 

Authority wishes to take this opportunity to thank the Town Manager, and the various Town Boards and Com- 
sions for their cooperation during the past year, and look forward to the continuation of this cooperation 
the Redevelopment Project nears completion. 

LIST OF OFFICERS 1972 - 1973 

Term 
Expires 



Chairman Raymond A. McNamara 19 76 

Vice-chairman William F. Butt 1977 

Secretary & Acting Director Robert F. Leahy 1973 

Treasurer Richard W. Thackeray 1974 

Assistant Treasurer (State Appt.) Milton Bradford, Jr. 1974 



45 



Board of Health 



The number of personnel remained the same in 1972. Mr. James Durk.ee was elected Chairman of the Board. 
A comprehensive Health Fair involving many of the service organizations was held in October of 1972. 
Flu vaccine was purchased at State cost and made available to Town employees, school personnel and the eld 
The Board negotiated a three-year contract for the collection of garbage. 

The Board participated in regional discussions on solid waste with Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North 
Andover . 

A Health Counselling Program was begun in June for the elderly. 

The Board sponsored and participated in an obesity program at the New England Memorial Hospital. 
A Baby Sitting Course was initiated for children 10 to 14 years of age. 
The Board of Health was assigned the funds for Family Counselling. 
A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE CONTROL 



1 . Monthly Immunization Clinic ; 

2 . Smallpox Clinic ; 

3. Anti-Rabies Clinic ; 

4 . Mantoux Test for Tuberculosis ; 

5 . Measles Immunization ; 

6. Tuberculosis Control: 



Attendance 



Attendance 



Dogs Immunized 



Persons Tested 



Persons Immunized 



New Cases Reported in 1972 

Hospitalized during year 

Visits to hospital 

Home visits 

Hospital costs 

Deaths 



46 



1971 



469 



19 

2 



56 



482 



] ; 



7. Flu Vaccine : 

The Board, in an attempt to reduce absenteeism, made the flu vaccine available to 
all Town employees and School Personnel. The vaccine was also made available to 
Senior Citisens. 

School Personnel 
Town Employees 
Senior Citizens 

8. Industrial Hygiene : 

Number T.B. Tested 

9. Special Immunization Clinics : 

A special immunization clinic for children entering first grade was held, and also 
for Seniors. 

Attendance: first grade 
seniors 

10. Health Fair ; 

A Health Fair involving many of the service organizations was held in October. This 
was sponsored by the Wilmington Women's Club with cooperation from the New England 
Memorial Hospital. The Fair featured a variety of free health tests including: obesity 
hypertension, cancer, glaucoma, dental and vital capacity. A complete blood profile 
was also offered for $5.00. 

11. Health Counselling for Senior Citizens : 

A Health and Social Counselling service was started in June on a weekly basis for 
Senior Citizens. All Senior Citizens are invited to attend at Deming Way every Tuesday 
at 2:00 p.m. 

Attendance (since June) 

12. Baby Sitting Course : 

A baby sitting course in the school system was arranged with the New England Memorial 
Hospital who provided the teacher. Four weekly sessions were held for the 10 to 14 
age group. All 66 children received certificates of completion. 

Attendance 

13. Family Counselling : 

Money for a Family Counselling Program was placed under the jurisdiction of the Board 
of Health. A total of $18,000 has been budgeted for 18 months for the period 1973-1974 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

1. Premature Births : 

Home Visits 

The Board did not expend any funds for hospitalization of premature births in 1972. 

2. Day Care Centers : 

Visits 

The Board voted to allow the State to assume the responsibility of licensing Day Care 
Centers, as allowed by law. 

3. Morbidity Service : 

Nursing Visits 
Fees Collected 

4. Newborn Infants : 

Home Visits 

5. General Home Visits: 



47 



DENTAL HEALTH 



Children Serviced 
Home Visits 



ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

1. Licenses and Permits: 



Sewerage 
Food 

Milk (vehicle) 

Milk (store) 

Recreation Camps 

Day Care Centers 

Piggeries 

Funeral Directors 

Ice Cream Manufacturing 

Refuse Transportation 

Stable 

Installers 

Fees Totaled 



2. Sewage Disposal Sanitation : 

Existing Dwellings 
New Dwellings 
Commercial 
Industrial 



Inspections and Investigations 
3. Milk Sanitation: 



International Certificates; 



Daries Licensed 
Stores Licensed 
Milk Analysed 



Number Certified 



5 . Dump Contract : 

The Board negotiated an 18 month contract for the sum of $60,000 per year. All 
other parts of the contract remain the same. 

6. Garbage Contract : 

The Board with the assistance of Simon Cutter negotiated a three-year contract 
as follows: 

May 1, 1972-April 30, 1973 $35,000 
May 1, 1973-April 30, 1974 39,000 
May 1, 1974-April 30, 1975 41,500 

7. Complaints ; 

8. Inspector of Animals : 

Animals Quarantined 

Animals Released from Quarantine 

Animals Disposed of 

Animals Submitted to Lab. for Examination 
Premises Keeping Domestic Animals Inspected 



Food Establishments : 

Inspections 
Permits Issued 



48 



10. 



Air Pollution : 

The Town passed a by-law empowering the local Board of Health to enforce the State's 
Air Pollution Regulations. 



The Board enforced the "no burning" regulation throughout the Town. 

Air pollution complaints directed toward industry were minimal after the remaining 
plant installed a control device. 



11 . Recreation Sanitation : 

The Board carried out its responsibility of collecting swimming water samples at 
Silver Lake during the bathing season. 

Samples Collected 

Drinking Samples Collected 



11 
2 



12. Water Analysis ; 



Samples Collected 



13. Subdivisions : 

The Board processed seven subdivisions involving approximately 225 houses. Test 
pits were dug and water tables were observed. 



14. 



Court : 



Appearances in Court 



Board wishes to extend thanks to all those who participated in the Health Fair, particularly 
Wilmington Women's Club and the New England Memorial Hospital. 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 1,729 

Dogs Confined . . . . 185 

Complaints Covered 3,165 

Court Complaints 343 

Court Fines Paid $ 958 

Dogs Disposed of 378 

Dogs Killed by Cars 83 

Resident Calls for Licenses 1,073 

Kennels - $50.00 

$25.00 3 

$10.00 2 



49 



i 



• ' ■ ' '• /■• ■. ■ 'Jul ' 




Board of Appeals 



Applicant 

Case #1-72 
Ruth I. Gilbert 

Case #2-72 
Earl L. Hupper 



Reason for Appeal 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot at 
113 Nichols Street. 



For a variance to erect houses on two lots at Crest 
and Oxford Streets. 



Decisio l 
Granted 
I 



Case #3-72 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



For a variance for the temporary use of a trailer during 
construction of six homes on land off Webber Street. 



Granted 



Case #4-72 
Quality Car Wash 



For a variance to erect two temporary signs on a lot at 
581 Main Street. 



Grantee 



Case #5-72 
Paul Bongiomo 



Case #6-72 
Antonio Capone 

Case #7-72 

Arline Lally 

(F. Newhouse, Agent) 

Case #8-72 
Dunkin' Donuts 

Case #9-72 

Lucci's Realty Trust 
(Mel ro s e -Wake f ie Id 
Trust, Agent) 

Case #10-72 

William & Paula Elliott 



Case #11-72 

William J. Frey et ux 



For a variance to remove earth from a parcel of land on 
Park Street for filling a lot on Park Street. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on Adelmen Road. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
Pleasant Street. 



For a variance to erect signs on a lot on Main Street. 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at 211 Lowell Street. 



For a variance to maintain a three-family dwelling on a 
lot at 12 Silver Lake Avenue. 



For a variance to convert a barn to additional living space 
on a lot at 46 Middlesex Avenue. 



Grantee 



Denied 



Denied 



Grantee 



Denied' 



Denied 



50 




leant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



//12-72 
or M. Okolo 



For a variance to erect a roof over a patio on a lot 
at 3 Pleasant Street. 



Granted 



n3-72 
ph & Jean Leach 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
Thurston Avenue. 



Granted 



//14-72 
ay-Kelly Corp. 



For a special permit to erect two signs on a lot on 
Main Street. 



Denied 



//15-72 
ay-Kelly Corp. 



For a special permit to erect two signs on a lot on 
Main Street. 



Denied 



//16-72 
h LePore, M.D. 



For a variance to establish a physician's office on a 
lot at 172 Middlesex Avenue. 



Granted 



//1 7- 72 
stus A. Miele 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a 
lot at 3 Truman Road. 



Granted 



//18-72 
ert Varella 
liam Galameau, 
t) 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Crescent 
Street. 



Denied 



//19-72 
Jon Realty Tr. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a repair garage 
on a lot at 275 Main Street. 



Granted 



//20-72 
F. Realty Tr. 



For a variance to erect two free-standing signs on a lot 
at 128 West Street. 



Denied 



//21-72 
le Lally 

?Jewhouse, Agent) 
//22-72 



lel Papera 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Pleasant 
Street. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot 
at 59 West Street. 



Denied 



Denied 



//23-72 
1 H. Perry 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot 
at 30 Fairmeadow Road. 



Granted 



//24-72 

t F. Dudley 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot 
at 46 Columbia Street. 



Granted 



//25-72 
P. Melzar 

I #26-72 
r B. Gifford 

#27-72 

h Mastromarino 
liirk. Agent) 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Auburn Avenue. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a non- 
conforming lot at 5 Hobson Avenue. 

For a variance to divide a parcel of land on Salem Street 
and Robin Road. 



Denied 



Granted 



Denied 



51 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decisiot 



Case #28-72 
Charles Karigianis 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
Ivy Court. 



Granted 



Case //29-72 

Anthony & Valerie Grenier 



For a variance to correct an error in placing the house 
too close to the side lot line. 



Granted 



Case #30-72 
Murray-Kelly Corp. 
(E. Stratis, Agent) 



For a variance to operate a sandwich shop on a lot at 
35 Lowell Street. 



Denied 



Case #31-72 
Arthur Johnson 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on 
188 Taft Road. 



Granted 



Case #32-72 

James T. McFarland 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at 376 Middlesex 
Avenue . 



Granted , 



Case #33-72 
James T. Beninati 



For a variance to erect an inground swimming pool on a lot 
at 47 Hathaway Road. 



Granted! 



Case #34-72 
John Elia 



For a variance to erect a sign at 379 Middlesex Avenue. 



Grantedf 



Case #35-72 
John Graham & 
Allan Robicheau 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at 474 Main Street. 



Denied 



Case #36-72 

Daniel J. MacKinnon 



For a variance to operate a dispatching taxi business from 
his house at 292 Main Street. 



Denied 



Case #37-72 
Stewart H. Trickett 
(J. Courtney, Agent) 

Case #38-72 

Eve, Elizabeth £i Leona 
Levine 



For a variance on two lots on Chelsea Street. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Jordan Street. 



Denied 



Denied 



Case #39-72 

George & Bette Robicheau 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot at 
6 McDonald Road. 



Granted! 



Case #40-72 
Irving H. Rice 

Case #41-72 
Robert P. Stevens 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot at 10 Hanover Street. Grantedl 



For a variance to combine land on Swain Court and divide into 
two lots. 



GrantecJ 



Case #42-72 

Ken. Richardson, Jr. 

Case #43-72 
Robert L. Knight 



For a variance to erect a garage on a lot at 4 Dayton Road. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot 
at 51 North Street. 



Grantee! 



Grantei 



52 



pllcan t 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



36 //44-72 
G. F. Realty Tr. 



For a variance to erect two free-standing signs on a lot 
at 128 West Street. 



Granted 



3e //A5-72 

rkshire Realty Tr. 
Iw. Tessier, Agent) 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on McDonald Road. 



Withdrawn 



36 //46-72 

in & Amelia Suplee 
nes & Barbara White 



For a variance to sell part of Lot 1 to the owner of Lot 2 at 
1 Nickers on Avenue. 



Granted 



;6 //47-72 

;rence & Marguerite 
liell 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling at 11 Kieman 
Avenue . 



Granted 



;6 //48-72 
Fred & Carlo B. 
lenso 



For a special permit for the storage and manufacture of acrylic 
coatings on a lot on Industrial Way. 



Denied 



.e #49-72 

;hony & Valerie J. 
;nier 



For a variance to maintain a carport on a lot at 14 Dell Drive. 



Denied 



6 //50-72 
J. Morrissey, Jr. 

e #51-72 

ert J. Si Lucille F. 
holas 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Dorchester Street. Denied 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot at 
9 Longview Road. 



Granted 



e #52-72 

mo J. Cater ino, & 
ro-Mat Food Systems 



For a special permit to operate a packaging of pre-plated meal 
business on a lot on Middlesex Avenue. 



Granted 



e #53-72 
eph T. Hayes 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot at 
29 Chestnut Street. 



Granted 



2 #54-72 
ray-Kelly Corp. 



For a special permit for the approval of a Master Plan for signs 
to be erected at 25-35 Lowell Street. 



Granted 



i ; #55-72 

iLn & Patricia 

ifield 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 59 Shawsheen 
Avenue . 



Granted 



l i #56-72 

"ia & Dave Raynor 

f. #57-72 

^'S A. Pacheco 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at 418 Main Street. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot at 
7 Kirk Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



t : #58-72 

■ ur W. Wiggin, Jr. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a building at 458-460 
Main Street. 



Granted 



I: #59-72 

I; lino & Lillian 

: OS ino 



For a variance to establish a two-family dwelling at 10 Main 
Street . 



Denied 



53 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Declsior 



Case //60-72 
Congregational Church 



For a special permit to operate a kindergarten and nursery 
school . 



Granted 



Case #61-72 
Armand E. Morin 

Case #62-72 
Patricia B. Meketa 



For a variance to erect a garage on a lot on Butters Row. 



For a special permit to operate a nursery school on a lot 
at 127 Burlington Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #63-72 

William & Eleanor Reed 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot 
at 1 Drury Lane . 



Grante 



Case #64-72 
Ralph Anderson 



For a variance to divide a lot on Mather & Wall Streets into 
two lots. 



Denied 



Case #65-72 

Professional Tech., Inc. 



Case #66-72 

James A. & Joanne Day 



For a variance to erect a building at Lowell & Bay Streets Granted 
having insufficient parking area. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 410 Granted 
Wobum Street. 



Case #67-72 
James Graham 



For a variance to erect an addition to a building on a lot at Grante 
113A Grove Avenue. 



Case #68-72 
Fares Deb an 

Case #69-72 

Roncalli Civic Property 
Assoc. , Order of Sons 
of Italy 

Case #70-72 

Roberta & George Davis 

Case #71-72 
Richard S. Homung 

Case #72-72 

Charles & Dorothy Duffy 

Case #73-72 
Florence E. Culipher 
(Arthur Smith, Agent) 

Case #74-72 
James W. Miner 

Case #75-72 
Richard Stuart 



For a variance to erect dwellings on two lots on Royal Street. Denied 



For a special permit to locate and erect a non-profit clubhouse Granted 
and lodge in accordance with Sec. III-l-B-5 of the zoning by- 
law on land on Ballardvale Street. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on a lot at Grante 
19 Pershing Street. 



For a variance to operate a dental office at 306 Main Street. Grante 

Denied 

For a variance to divide a lot at 95 Aldrich Road into two lots. 



For a variance on five lots on Woburn Street. Grante 



For a variance to erect an addition to a lot at 9 Marjorie Road. Grantee 



For a variance to divide two parcels of land on Shawsheen Avenue, Denied I 

Carter Lane and Amherst Road into three lots. 



54 



licant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



e //76-72 
estone Tire and 
ber Company 

e //77-72 

n & Leita Ruggiero 
e //78-72 

ters Realty Trust 

e m-12 

c G. Swans on 

e //80-72 

etheart Plastics, 

e //81-72 

er J. Chisholm 

e //82-72 

er & Marion Woller 
e //83-72 

ard & Beverly Pereira 
J //84-72 



fessional Tech., Inc. 



For a variance to erect two signs on a lot at 496 Main Street. 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land at 169 Andover Street. 



For a variance on two lots on Grove Avenue. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Eddy Street. 



For a variance to erect a warehouse on a lot at 1 Burlington 
Avenue. 



For a variance to erect a double-wide mobile home on a lot on 
Hopkins Street. 

For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot at 31 Main Street. 



For a variance to sell part of lot 23A to the owner of lot 23 
on Oak Street. 



For a variance to erect a medical and/or professional office 
building at the corner of Lowell and Bay Streets. 



Granted 



Denied 



Denied 



Denied 



Granted 



Denied 



Withdrawn 



Withdrawn 



Withdrawn 





A quiet residential street 



Roadside maintenance 



55 




Jury List 



(* Indicates Married Woman) 
(Revised - August 1,-1972) 

NAME RESIDENCE OCCUPATION 



Arsenault, Richard J. 
*Bachman, Joan M. 

Backman, Carl A., Jr. 
*Backman, Hazel E. 
*Baker, Irene B. 

Baker, Wesley H. 

Balser, Foster B. 

Banfield, Colin A. 

Barrett, Eric P. 
*Barry, Kathleen A. 

Barry, Michael L. 

Barry, Richard T. 

Barry, Thomas F. 

Beardsley, Charles R. 
*Belason, Ann T. 

Belason, E. Bruce 

Belofsky, Israel 
*Bemis, Mary M. 

Bickmore, Robert F. 

Birkenbach, Donald J. 

Blair, Wallace M. 

Blakeslee, William R. 

Blomerth, Donn L. 

Bova, Joseph A. 

Bowen, John L. 

Bradford, Milton L., Jr. 
*Brady, Helen M. 

Breen, Thomas J. 

Brennick, Leo V., Jr. 
*Burke, Evelyn S. 
*Burns, Dena R. 

Carleton, Edward G. 
*Carlson, Josephine J. 

Carrasco, Fructuoso 

Catalano, Americo A. 

Chalmers, Ralph W. 

Chapman, Lawrence H. 

Chislett, Ralph 
*Clark, Nancy H. 



16 Oakdale Road 
10 Marie Drive 
149 Aldrich Road 
151 Chestnut Street 
127 Grove Avenue 

4 Cedar Street 

136 Middlesex Avenue 
529 Shawsheen Avenue 
44 Boutwell Street 
8 Chandler Road 
8 Chandler Road 
37 Adams Street 
130 Grove Avenue 
49 Lawrence Street 
47 Middlesex Avenue 
47 Middlesex Avenue 
36 Hopkins Street 
133 Grove Avenue 
3 Loumac Road 
292 Salem Street 
393 Shawsheen Avenue 
10 Hathaway Road 
Ballardvale Street 

22 Forest Street 
100 Main Street 
12 Dorothy Avenue 
3 Roberts Road 

77 Middlesex Avenue 
41 Boutwell Street 
1 Harris Street 

12 Pinewood Road 

5 Fairview Avenue 

13 Main Street 
29 Adams Street 

12 Cedarcrest Road 
10 Wicks Circle 
Ballardvale Street 
20 Oakdale Road 

23 Floradale Avenue 



Senior Clerk 

Housewife 

Salesman 

Housewife 

Waitress 

Ink Base Mixer Operator 

Salesman 

Leader Lineman 

Lathe Hand 

Housewife 

Library Aide 

Retired 

Senior Tel. Corr. Clerk 

Accounts Receivable Anal 

Homemaker 

Engineer 

Store Manager 

Housewife 

Engineering 

Electrician 

Sales Manager 

Machine Shop Supervisor 

Ass't. Elec. Design Eng 

Auto Body Tech. 

Night Foreman 

Ins. Claim Examiner 

Cost Accounting 

Unemployed 

Tech. Specialist 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Inventory Clerk 

Chic's Elec. Inc. 

Contract Engineering 

Service Salesman 

Truck Driver 

Electrician Planner 

Retired 

Realtor & Tax Examiner 



56 



ry List : (continued) 
NAME 

larke, H. Robert 
leary, Eleanor M. 
ollins, Patricia A. 
onnoliy, Arthur E. 
oursey, C. Homer 
romwell, Effie L. 
unningham, Edith L. 
urrier, Cedric E. 
urrier, Doris G. 
alton, Walter J. 
anieli, Domenic R. 
avey, James J. 
avidson, William James 
awson, James F. 
ecker, Dorothy M. 
elano, Harold L. 
eveau, Yvonne M. 
iGirolamo, Mary A. 
onnelly, Lawrence M. 
rohan, John J. 
rugan, William H. 
uggan, Patricia F. 
unn, Claire M. 
arling, Arthur S. 
ly, Irene R. 
nery, Catherine M. 
Laherty, Phyllis Marie 
Laherty, Virginia 
Dgg, Lorraine 
jley, John P. 
iller, Roland M. 
Jge, Robert V. 
mgi, Michael J. 
iorge, John 
ravallese, Antonio A. 
iley, David J. 
irmen, Kenneth 
inke, Erwin 
ibsch, Donald F. 
;rrin, Leland C. 
.11, Jean P. 
.nxman, Walter I. 
igg, Douglas M. 
lule, Omer 
isen, William C. 
.nter, Delbert L. 
•Ikanajian, John 
^vanaugh, Lorena F. 
Iroy, George L. 
imenchuk, Phillip 
llig, Joseph J. 
■.Follette, Mary A. 
ifollette, Samuel D. 
Inzillo, Richard 
lughton, Rodney E. 
Iwrenson, Charles P. 
lavitt, Kenneth R. 
le, Robert E. 
lunsbury, Evelyn E, 
1»7, James 



RESIDENCE 

52 West Street 
4 Hathaway Road 
45 Shady Lane Drive 
35 Lawrence Street 

17 Frederick Drive 
35 Adams Street 

48 Lawrence Street 
10 Thurston Avenue 

10 Thurston Avenue 
48 Grove Avenue 

11 Brattle Street 

10 Fairmeadow Road 

26 Gunderson Road 
65 Glen Road 

28 Lawrence Street 
291 Wobum Street 

38 Oakdale Road 

8 Sprucewood Road 

12 Sprucewood Road 
121 Salem Street 

7 Chandler Road 
42 Adams Street 
71 Grove Avenue 
3 Woodland Drive 

11 Birchwood Road 

39 Hanover Street 
6 Hob son Avenue 
20 Birchwood Road 
24 Linda Road 

12 Birchwood Road 

11 Adams Street 
14 Cochrane Road 

27 Chestnut Street 

8 Kelley Road 

3 Hanson Road 
102 Woburn Street 
124 Burlington Avenue 
Carolyn Road 

20 S trout Avenue 
123 Chestnut Street 

12 Lloyd Road 

147 Chestnut Street 

18 Columbia Street 
60 Chestnut Street 
75 Glen Road 

9 Lang Street 
1 Pilling Road 
16 Kelley Road 
298 Salem Street 
35 Swain Road 

13 Grace Drive 
875 Main Street 
875 Main Street 
9 Kelley Road 
31 Adams Street 
55 Swain Road 

4 Pleasant Street 
23 Forest Street 

28 Shady Lane Drive 
585 Wobum Street 



OCCUPATION 

Supervisor 

Ass't. Bookkeeper 

Housewife 

Group Leader 

Supervisor 

Lecturer 

Housewife 

Machinist 

Service Rep. 

Machinist 

Sawroom Foreman 

P.B.X. Inspector 

Ass't. Purchasing Mgr. 

Credit Manager 

Counter Girl 

Lab. Technician 

Secretary 

Waitress 

Computer Analyst 
Truck Driver 
Assistant Manager 
Homemaker 
Housewife 

Mgr. System Safety Eng. 

Housewife 

Widow 

Housewife 

Data Transcriber 

Housewife 

Electrician 

Iron Worker 

Prod. Planner 

General Electric 

Department Manager 

Foreman Clerk 

Newspaper Chauffeur 

Jeweler 

Prof. Engineer 
Loan Officer 
Electrician 
Cafeteria Worker 
Chief Chem. Operator 
Sr. Plant Accountant 
Mech. Engineer 
Elec. Engineer 
Office Machine Repair 
Design Draftsman 
Housewife 
Service Man 
Unemployed 
Planner 

Library Assistant 
Truck Driver 
Accountant 

Field Service Engineer 
Ind. Developer Dir /Engineer 
Foreman Refrigeration 
Assistant Treasurer 
Housewife 

Custom House Broker 



57 



Jury List : (Continued) 



NAME 

Lux, Ralph A. 
*Lynch, Bernice L. 

Lyons, William 
*Lyons, Leila P. 

Marini, Edison F. 

Mathews, Robert J. 

Maxwell, Robert L. 
*McAndrew, Mary E. 

McCarron, Gertrude E. 
*McCarthy, Marilyn K. 
*McGinley, Rosemary E. 

McVicker, Robert N. 

Micalizzi, Anthony 
*Michelson, Edith M. 
*Montuori, Gertrude C. 

Moore, Eric E. 

Morrissey, Joseph E. 
*Mosher, Marjorie G. 

Muise, John A. 

Muise, Joseph G. 

Mulholland, Francis A. 
*Nelson, Dorothy 

O'Brien, Hazel M. 

0' Sullivan, Michael 
*Parsons, Florence B. 
*Passmore, Adele Carolyn 

Phillips, George M. 

Pierce, William A, 

Pilcher, Richard F. 

Pipes, Millard C. 

Pisani, Michael 

Poirier, William C. Jr. 

Porga, Peter J. 

Porter, Clifton S., Jr. 

Potenza, Alfred C. 

Quinn, John J., Jr. 

Ready, William D. 

Rich, Donald E. 

Riley, Stanley G. Jr. 

Roberts, Dorothy H. 

Roberts, Kenneth H. 

Rumson, David A. 

Rushton, George H. 

Sampson, Raymond Jr. 
*Saunders, Irene E. 

Sevener, Walter J. 

Sferrazza, Francis 

Smallidge, Milliard C. 

Smith, Gilbert 

Storms, Irving H. 

Story, William E. 
*St rouse. Donna J. 

Suggs, Angus W. 

Sugrue, Arthur W. 

Swan, Willard M. 

Spinney, Chester R. 

Thomas, Edward A. 

Tsicouleas, John S. 

Tedesco, Anthony 



RESIDENCE 

17 Dadant Drive 

98 Grove Avenue 
107 Chestnut Street 
107 Chestnut Street 
3A Shady Lane Drive 
7 Redwood Terrace 

2 Massachusetts Avenue 

11 Williams Avenue 
270 Middlesex Avenue 
14 Birchwood Road 
104 Middlesex Avenue 

16 Lawrence Court 

17 Marjorie Road 
33 Adams Street 

220 Burlington Avenue 
35 Concord Street 
121 Grove Avenue 
6 Sheldon Avenue 

99 West Street 

29 Pershing Street 
225 Shawsheen Avenue 
59 Park Street 

18 Hobson Avenue 

20 Forest Street 

4 Marion Street 
94 Andover Street 

21 Clark Street 

6 Frederick Drive 
443 Middlesex Avenue 
300 Chestnut Street 

12 Catherine Avenue 

3 Chandler Road 
39 Hanover Street 
91 Beacon Street 

7 North Street 
522 Woburn Street 
11 Wing Road 

25 Allen Park Drive 
Cedarcrest Road 
11 Catherine Avenue 
10 Lee Street 
91 Salem Street 

38 Shady Lane Drive 
1 Fairmeadow Road 
24 Fairmeadow Road 
395 Middlesex Avenue 
21 Fairmeadow Road 

5 Sewell Road 
17 Beech Street 

30 Hobson Avenue 
Pinewood Road 

14 Shady Lane Drive 
402 Shawsheen Avenue 

39 Marcus Road 

246 Middlesex Avenue 
3 Pineridge Road 

13 Fairmeadow Road 
28 Marcus Road 

37 Clark Street 



OCCUPATION 

Lex, Fed. Savings & Loan 

Cashier 

Brakeman 

Secretary 

Eng. Fac. Coordinator 
Fork Truck Driver 
Iron Worker 
Housewife 
Accountant 

Switchboard Operator 

Housewife 

Design Draftsman 

Custodial Sup. 

Homemaker 

Housewife 

Experimental Machinist 
Retired 

Chief Switchboard Operator 

Punch Press Set up 

Sr. Eng. Assistant 

Foreman 

Housewife 

Secretary 

Elec. Mechanical Tech. 
Cook 

Housewife 

Elev. Mechanic & Installer 
Dept. Manager 
Unemployed 
Retired 

Standard Tool Grinder 
Auto Center Manager 
Machinis t 
Journeyman 
Carpenter 

Life Ins., Field Agent 
Sales Service & Install. 
Scientific Research Aide 
Offset Stripper 
Ceramics Teacher 
Inspector 
Eng. Aide 
Sr. Scientist 
Journeyman, Ironworker 
Accounts Payable Clerk 
Tool & Die Maker 
Coffee Salesman 
Filter Pump Operator 
Eng. Assistant 
Punch Pres. Operator 
Elec. Mech. Technician 
Housewife 

Furniture Repairing 
Elec. Tech. 

Inspector of Metal Prod. 
Retired 

Lithographic Stripper 

Machinist 

Wringer 



58 



iry List : (continued) 



NAME 

'row, Roger C. 
fallace, Herbert J. Jr. 
'augh, Jeanne M. 
'ebber, Barbara H. 
eed, Alice G. 
eed, John E. 
eimer, Betty L. 
ibert, David E. 
icks, Theodore R. 
illiams, Joseph D. 
orby, Mary A. 
orks, John W. 
amaites, George 
ambernardi, Mario 



RESIDENCE 

2 Oakdale Road 

33 Linda Road 

12 Wildwood Street 
11 Hariris Street 
2 Cunningham Street 
2 Cunningham Street 

34 Burlington Avenue 

35 Birchwood Road 
23 Gunderson Road 
42 Hopkins Street 
316 Middlesex Avenue 
9 Linda Road 

6 Chapman Avenue 

7 Elwood Road 



OCCUPATION 

Tech. Rep. N.C.R. 
Tech. Writer, Pub. 

Housewife 
Housewife 
Retired 
Retired 

Candy Decorator 

Administrative Ass't. 

Mgr. Accounting Dept. 

Machinist 

Housewife 

Field Supervisor 

Retarder Oper. 

Oil Business 



Veteran's Agent 



erans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 115, with strict compliance to 
s Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. Benefits are for the needy 
aran and his immediate family who have been subjected to unforeseen needs. Final approval of benefits 
2S from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

1 appropriation for 1972 was $80,000.00 as voted at the Annual Town Meeting. Total expended for aid to 
'2rans and their families was $58,149.30. 

nl reimbursements from settled assignments on accident cases authorized by the Commissioner's Office were 
•3.50. Because 50% of the amount authorized by the Commissioner's Office is shared by the Town, the Town's 
ire on assignment cases is $246.75. The total amount of $493.50 has been turned over to the Town Treasurer, 
1 the Commonwealth has been notified so adjustment of any monies can be made before State reimbursement 
i:he Town. 

I work load of this department increases with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to Social 
(irity and Education. Unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns and lack of work always has an impact on 
fnditures. Case load varies from time to time and has increased over previous years. 

department aids the veteran in many areas such as admittance and transportation to V.A. hospitals, 
ics, and Social Security offices; applications and reports for various V.A. benefits; and financial 
: stance - directing the veteran and/or his dependents to the proper channels. 

Voted at Annual Town Meeting $ 80,000.00 

Total Expended in 1972 58,149.30 



Balance $ 21,850.70 



59 



Accepted Streets 



S tree t 


From 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


Date (s) 


Adams Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Parker Street 




4600 


3-02-08 


Aldrich Road 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Billerica Line 


1.2 




11-06-94 


Allen Park Drive 


Fairmont Avenue 


Fairmont Avenue 




2345 


3-27-71 


Andover Street 


Salem Street 


Andover Line 


2.3 






Anthony Avenue 


Salem Street 


Catherine Avenue 






10-03-66 


Apollo Drive 


Draper Drive 


Charlotte Road 




300 


3-27-71 


Arlene Avenue 


Salem Street 


Dorothy Avenue 






10-03-66 


Auburn Avenue 


Shawsheen Avenue 






800 


3-12-45 


Ayotte Street 


Westdale Avenue 


Crest Avenue 




240 


3-10-47 


Baker Street 


Brand Avenue 






700 


3-12-45 


Ballardvale Street 


Salem Street 


Andover Line 


2.7 




11-06-94 


Baland Road 


Ballardvale Street 


Route 93 




545 


3-18-72 


Bancroft Street 


Liberty Street 


B & M RR. 




400 


3-17-52 


Beacon Street 


Church Street 


Belmont Avenue 




1000 


3-01-15 


Beech Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Byron Street 




1000 


3-10-47 


Beeching Avenue 


Cunningham Street 


Faulkner Avenue 




450 


3-14-59 


Belmont Avenue 


Columbia Street 


State Street 




1000 


3-03-33 


Benson Road 


Radcliff Road 


Tewksbury Town Line 




616 


3-27-71 


Birchwood Road 


Judith Road 


Short Street 




1550 


3-17-52 


Boutwell Street 


Aldrich Road 


Burlington Avenue 


0.8 




11-06-94 


Boutwell Street 


Northerly end of 












1960 Town Layout 


Aldrich Road 




2835 


3-27-71 


Brand Avenue 


Bridge Lane 


Baker Street 




2370 


3-13-33 


Brattle Street 


Massachusetts Avenue 


Garden Avenue 




1100 


3-12-45 


Brentwood Avenue 


Woods id e Avenue 


Woburn Street 




907 


6-21-38 


Bridge Lane 


Main Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


0.3 




11-06-94 


Broad Street 


Carmel Street 


Both Ways 




1377 


3-13-54 


Burlington Avenue 


Main Street 


Burlington Line 


1.6 




11-06-94 


Bumap Street 


Grove Avenue 


Winchell Road 




1378 


3-12-45 


Burt Road 


Cedar Street 


Fall Street 




2500 


3-12-45 


Butters Row 


Main Street 


Chestnut Street 


0.6 




11-06-94 


Buzzell Drive 


Evans Drive 


Draper Drive 




600 


3-27-71 


Catherine Avenue 


Arlene Avenue 


Dorothy Avenue 






10-03-66 


Canal Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Burt Road 




1511 


10-16-39 


Carolyn Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 




950 


3-12-60 


Carolyn Road 


Linda Road 


Marcia Road 




282 


3-27-71 


Carson Avenue 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 




677 


3-10-53 


Carson Avenue Ext. 


Marie Drive 






300 


3-11-61 


Carter Lane 


Shawsheen Avenue 






1400 


3-09-57 


Cedar Street 


Harris Street 


Burt Road 




600 


3-12-45 



3-21 



3-10 
3-12 



3-lC 
3-11 



3-i: 



3-i; 



60 



Street 



From 



To 



Miles Feet 



Date (s) Accepted 



dar Crest Road 
ntral Street 
andler Road 
apinan Avenue 
arlotte Road 
ase Road 
estnut Street 
arch Street 
ark Street 
chrane Road 
lumbia Street 
icord Street 
igress Street 
dIc Avenue 
Dlidge Road 
rey Avenue 
Ctage Street 
2St Avenue 
3SS Street 
iningham Street 
5ress Street 



Pinewood Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Kelley Road 
Sheridan Road 
Gunderson Road 
Hathaway Road 
Burlington Avenue 
Main Street 
Main Street 
Forest Street 
Church Street 
Federal Street 
Forest Street 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Grand Street 
Main Street 
Ayotte Street 
Main Street 
Salem Street 
Glen Road 



Judith Road 
Church Street 
Adams Street 
Hathaway Road 
Apollo Drive 

Wobum Line 
Middlesex Avenue 
Church Street 
Warren Road 
Talbot Avenue 
No. Reading Line 
Burlington Line 
Kensington Avenue 

Canal Street 



Lowell Street 
Beaching Avenue 



2.1 
0.8 
0.8 

0.1 
1.1 



1100 
574 
400 

1575 
833 
297 



800 



965 
1000 
270 
370 
920 
560 
900 
2320 
260 



5-27-63 

10- 16-50 
3-09-57 
3-27-71 
3-27-71 
3-10-53 

11- 06-94 
11-06-94 
11-06-94 

3-10-47 
3-02-08 
11-06-94 

10- 16-39 
3-11-46 
3-05-51 
3-05-51 
3-13-54 
3-10-47 

11- 06-94 
3-44 3- 
3-05-51 



3-13-33 



52 



3-53 



iant Drive 
/is Street 
/ton Road 
11 Drive 

)Son Street 
rchester Street 
rothy Avenue 
iper Drive 
iper Drive 



iry Lane 
■lin Avenue 
ton Road 

les Street 
ards Road 
00 d Road 
rson Street 
ilewood Drive 
ms Drive 

irfield Avenue 
Irmeadow Road 
irmont Avenue 
►rview Avenue 
(euil Drive 
llkner Avenue 
! Street 
iiral Street 
Iguson Road 
fradale Avenue 
iham Road 
jst Street 
ierick Drive 

ii Road 

,idale Circle 



North Street 


North Street 






1710 


4 


3-14-64 


Main Street 








500 




3-17-52 


Hathaway Road 








170 




3-05-51 


Burlington Avenue 








450 




3-08-58 










1344 




3-18-72 


Glen Road 


Gary Street 






1402 




3-13-54 


Billerica Line 








1400 




3-05-51 


Barbara Avenue 


Arlene Avenue 






1556 




3-12-60 


Gunderson Road 








100 




3-14-59 


Easterly end of 1959 


Evans Drive 






1460 




3-27-71 


Town layout near 














Gunderson Road 














School Street 


Glen Road 










3-09-63 


Main Street 








500 




3-05-51 


Nassau Avenue 


Both Ways 






638 




3-10-56 


Main Street 


Wobum Street 





7 






11-06-94 


Forest Street 


Baldwin Road 






450 




3-10-47 


Forest Street 


Dead End 






642 




3-09-68 


Oakwood Road 


Faulkner Avenue 






600 




3-05-51 


Kenwood Avenue 


Dead End 






455 




3-27-71 


Gunderson Road 


Draper Drive 






1970 




3-27-71 


Main Street 








1300 




3-11-46 


Nichols Street 


Nichols Street 






2328 




3-08-58 


Molloy Road 


Dead End 






952 




3-27-71 


State Street 








650 




3-13-33 


Massachusetts Avenue 








1000 




10-16-50 


Glen Road 


W. Jamaica Avenue 






2671 




3-13-44 


Glen Road 


Gary Street 






700 




6-21-38 


Middlesex Avenue 


Wobum Street 


1 


1 






11-06-94 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Dead End 






1072. 


61 


3-11-67 


Burlington Avenue 


Dead End 






625 




3-21-70 


N. Reading Town Line 


Dead End 






3795 




3-27-71 


Aldrich Road 


Burlington Avenue 





8 






11-06-94 


Salem Street 












10-03-66 


Main Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


1 


3 






11-06-94 


Glen Road 


Glen Road 






1300 




3-17-52 



3-10-53 
3-12-45 



61 



Street 


From 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


Date (s) 


Glenview Road 


Suncrest Avenue 








360 


3-14-59 


Gowing Road 


Park Street 


Marcus Road 






900 


3-10-56 


Grace Drive 


Shawsheen Avenue 










10-03-66 


Grand Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Dunmore Road 






850 


3-17-52 


Grant Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR. 






780 


3-08-43 


Grove Avenue 


Main Street 


Lake Street 


0. 


4 




9-29-10 


Gunderson Road 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 






1081 


3-14-59 




Marie Drive 










10-03-66 


Hamlin Lane 


Lawrence Street 








558 


3-10-62 


Hanson Road 


Woodland Road 


Dead End 






840 


3-15-69 


Hardin Street 


Aldrich Road 


Lubbers Brook 






250 


3-05-51 


Hamden Street 


Main Street 


Glen Road 


0. 


1 




3-04-95 


Harold Avenue 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Reed Street 






1311 


3-27-71 


Harris Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Cedar Street 






700 


3-12-45 


Harvard Avenue 


Main Street 


River Street 






430 


3-05-51 


Hathaway Road 


Wobum Street 


Gunderson Road 






1858 


3-51 


Hathaway Road 


Easterly end of 1959 


Evans Drive 






1415 


3-27-71 




Town layout near 














Gunderson Road 












Hawthorne Road 


Wobum Street 








230 


3-10--56 


High Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Wobum Street 


0. 


5 




11-06-94 


Hillside Way 


Chestnut Street 


Burlington Line 


0. 


5 




3-02-14 


Hilltop Road 


Suncrest Avenue 








364 


3-14-59 


Hob son Avenue 


Pine Avenue 


150 ft. beyond 






1520 


3-45 






Wiser Street 










Hopkins Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Billerica Line 


0. 


5 




11-06-94 


Jaquith Road 


Shawsheen Avenue 








1250 


3-08-48 


Jere Road 


Fairmeadow Road 


Fairmeadow Road 






1247 


3-09-68 


Jones Avenue 


Glen Road 








719 


6-10-40 


Judith Road 


Birchwood Road 


Cedar Crest Road 






520 


3-10-53 


Kelley Road 


Adams Street 








923 


3-09-57 


Kendall Street 


Aldrich Road 


Blanchard Road 






1300 


3-12-45 


Kenwood Avenue 


Wobum Street 


Redwood Terrace 






530 


3-21-70 


Kenwood Avenue 


Southerly end of 1970 


Dead End 






1280 


3-27-71 




Town layout near 














Redwood Terrace 












Kieman Avenue 


Main Street 








693 


3-08-58 


Kilmarnock Street 


West Street 


Reading Line 


0. 


5 




11-06-94 


King Street 


Glen Road 


Broad Street 






2400 


6-10-40 


Kirk Street 


Main Street 








572 


3-05-51 


Lake Street 


Main Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1. 







11-06-94 


Lang Street 


Bancroft Street 


B & M RR. 






400 


3-17-52 


Laurel Avenue 


Malloy Road 


Parker Street 






657 


10-16-50 


Lawrence Court 


Lawrence Street 








683 


3-10-56 


Lawrence Street 


Glendale Circle 


Shady Lane Drive 






3773 


3-10-56 


Ledgewood Road 


Suncrest Avenue 








383 


3-14-59 


Liberty Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR. 






740 


3-08-43 


Lincoln Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR. 






720 


3-08-43 


Linda Road & Ext. 


High Street 








1940.5 


10-16-50 


Lloyd Road 


Main Street 








1050 


3-05-51 


Lockwood Road 


Ballardvale Street 








990 


3-09-57 


Longview Road 


Middlesex Avenue 








650 


3-14-59 


Loumac Road 


Drury Lane 


To End 








3-09-63 


Lowell Street 


Main Street 


Reading Line 


1. 


9 




11-06-94 


Lowell St. Park 


Station 7-50 


Station 14 - 50 








1908 - 1< 


Mackey Road 


Federal Street 








250 


3-08-43 



62 



Street 



From 



To 



Miles Feet 



Date (s) Accepted 



in Street 
Road 
rcia Road 
rie Drive 

rion Street 

rjorie Road 
ssachusetts Avenue 
Donald Road 
adow Lane 
lody Lane 
ddlesex Avenue 
les Street 
Her Road 
ore Street 
rse Avenue 
Stic Avenue 

ssau Avenue 
than Road 

chols Street 
ckerson Avenue 
rfolk Street 
rth Street 
aa Road 

k Street 
kdale Road 
icridge Circle 
swood Road 
son Street 



Tewksbury Line 


Wobum Line 4. 







11-06-94 


Gowing Road 


Gowing Road 




2315 


3-08-58 


North Street 


Dead End 




2827 


3-10-62 


WUUUlXI OL£^6cL 


inrusn ivoau 






1 1 —A 1 
J"^J. X~0 J. 


Thrush Road 


Gunderson Road 






10-03-66 


Burlington Avenue 






(1739) 


9-01-06 








( 900) 


3-12-45 


Main Street 






1550 


3-05-51 


Main Street 


St. Paul Street 




800 


3-12-45 


Salem Street 






1424 


3-13-44 


S un c re s t Avenue 






363 


3-09-57 


Shawsheen Avenue 








10-03-66 






o 




J. J. UD 7'+ 


Main Street 


Hob son Avenue 




400 


3-12-45 


Glen Road 


Emerson Street 




640 


3-12-45 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Wedgewood Avenue 




1528 


3-11-67 


Woburn Street 






1361 


10-16-39 


Middlesex Avenue 






598 


3-02-08 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Decatur Street 




2000 


3-11-46 


Senpek Road 


Northerly Dead End & 




490 






Southerly Dead End 




567 


3-27-71 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Shawsheen River 0. 


7 




11-06-94 


West Street 






900 


3-10-47 


Carter Lane 


Nassau Avenue 




538 


3-13-54 


Middlesex Avenue 


Dadant Drive 




3533 


3-12-45 


Kelley Road 






213 


3-13-65 


Salem Street 






350 


3-19-51 


Judith Road 


Short Street 




2280 


10-16-50 


Gowing Road 


Gowing Road 




1730 


3-08-58 


Main Street 


Fairfield Avenue 




850 


3-11-46 


Church Street 






132 


3-09-57 



3-27-71 



County 



3-13-54 



rk Street 


Wobum Street 


No. Reading Line 





.9 


11-06-94 


rker Street 


Lowell Street 


Blackstone Street 





36 


3-04-07 


tricia Circle 


Dell Drive 


Dell Drive 




595 


3-08-58 


rshing Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR. 




720 


3-08-43 


Lllips Avenue 


Wiser Street 


Wild Avenue 




1800 


3-11-46 


Lling Road 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 




930 


3-14-59 


le Avenue 


Main Street 


Hob son Avenue 




400 


3-12-45 


leridge Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 




900 


3-12-60 


leview Road 


Lipp Street 


Adelman Road 




450 


3-10-53 


lewood Road 


Birchwood Road 


Shady Lane Drive 




1332 


3-13-54 


iasant Road 


Middlesex Avenue 


Linda Road 




750 


3-10-62 


7der House Circle 


Middlesex Avenue 






730 


3-13-54 


Icliff Road 


South Street 


Benson Road 




355 


3-27-71 


Iroad Avenue 


Clark Street 


Stone Street 





2 


3-01-09 


Iwood Terrace 


Kenwood Avenue 


Dead End 




645 


3-21-70 


:d Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Dead End 




1090 


3-27-71 


ge Road 


Suncrest Avenue 






365 


3-10-56 


•er Street 


Massachusetts Avenue 


Harvard Avenue 




440 


3-10-62 


erts Road 


Burlington Avenue 






1860 


3-11-67 


lins Road 


Fenway Street 


Marion Street 




200 


3-13-54 


sevelt Road 


Boutwell Street 


Swain Road 




2000 


3-11-46 


al Street 


Salem Street 






1040 


3-05-51 


em Street 


Tewksbury Line 


No. Reading Line 


2 


7 


11-06-94 


ool Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


High School Lot 




616 


3-01-15 




Buzzell School 


Dead End 






3-09-63 



3-03-19 



3-13-54 



3-05-06 



63 



Street 



From 



To 



Miles Feet 



Date (s) 



Senpek Road 
Sewell Road 
Shady Lane Drive 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Sheridan Road 
Sheridan Road 
Sherwood Road 
Silver Lake Avenue 
Sprucewood Road 
State Street 
S trout Avenue 
Suncrest Avenue 
Swain Road 

Taft Road 
Tap 1 in Avenue 
Temple Street 
Thrush Road 
Thurston Avenue 
Truman Road 

Upton Court 

Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 

Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Avenue 
Webber Street 
Wedgewood Avenue 
West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wicks Circle 
Wightman Road 
Wild Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 
Wilton Drive 
Winchell Road 
Wing Road 
Wiser Street 
Wobum Street 
Woodland Road 
Woodlawn Avenue 



Wildwood Street 
Hathaway Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Hathaway Road 
Wobum Street 
Cochrane Road 
Lake Street 
Shady Lane Drive 
Belmont Avenue 
Lowell Street 
West Street 
Forest Street 

Swain Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Church Street 
Salem Street 
Church Street 
Hathaway Road 

Andover Street 

Main Street 

No. Reading Line 

Main Street 
Lake St. , Tewks. 
Clark Street 
Burlington Avenue 
Moore Street 
Woburn Street 
West Street 
Everett Avenue 
Warren Road 
Grove Avenue 
Middlesex Avenue 
Main Street 
Federal Street 
Shawsheen Avenue 
Grove Avenue 
Woburn Street 
Main Street 
Andover Street 
Lowell Street 
Border Avenue 



Nathan Road 

Lawrence Street 
Billerica Line 

Hathaway Road 
Forest Street 
Dexter Street 
Short Street 
Fairview Avenue 



Burlington Avenue 

Boutwell Street 
Lubbers Brook 

Marie Drive 



2.2 



Lubbers Brook 



Chase Street 
Dead End 
Dead End 
Reading Line 
B & M RR. 
Dead End 
Albert Street 
B & M RR. 
Wobum Street 

B & M RR. 

Bumap Street 

Taplin Avenue 
Woburn Line 
Dead End 

Kensington Avenue 



0.4 



0.2 



0.1 



0.3 



1.7 



0.2 
1.1 



4.2 




280 


3-27-71 


380 


3-12-55 


2676 


3-08-58 




11-06-94 


487 


3-05-51 


2020 


3-27-71 


445 


3-27-71 


455 


3-13-54 


dUU 


j-1 /-52 


275 


3-03-33 


686 


3-17-55 


1 O /. 


10 CA 

3-13-54 




on 
j-ZU— ZZ 




^ O 1 o o 
D-Zl- Jo 


yuu 




7/. 


£: r\/^ 1 1 

o-uo-ii 


400 


O 11 £ 1 

3-11—61 




3-04-07 


300 


3-10-53 




11-06-94 


1075 


3-06-16 


1200 


3-13-54 


42 J 


3-08-58 


100 


3-13-54 




O A 1 OA 

3-Oi-zO 


DOU 


1 C ^^Q 


475 


3-11-67 




11-06-94 


1211 


6-22-42 


533 


3-27-71 


230 


3-13-54 




12-29-10 




11-06-94 


693 


6-10-40 


760 


3-08-43 




10-03-66 


200 


3-12-45 


746 


3-08-58 


900 


10-16-50 




11-06-94 


1170 


3-15-69 


250 


3-17-52 



Special hearing on the official map 



64 



School Committee 



ne School Committee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1972. The present 
ambership of the Committee is as follows: 



L. Barbara Hooper, Chairman 
John Brooks, Vice Chairman 
Nancy Clark, Secretary 
James A. Demos 
Diana C. Imbimbo 
Richard Thackeray 



jring the calendar year 1972, both Mr. Arnold F. Lanni and Mr. Walter J. McNamara resigned from the School 
jmmittee. Both gentlemen had provided distinguished leadership to the Committee over the past several 
iars, and their many contributions were duly noted by the remaining members. Mr. Richard Thackeray was 
jpointed on November 9, 1972 to fill Mr. McNamara' s unexpired term. 

The Light at the End of the Tunnel 

ro events took place during 1972 which are directly related to Wilmington's school-space problem, one far 
)re encouraging than the other. First, Wilmington opened its school doors on September 6, 1972 to the 
irgest student enrollment in the town's history, 5,212 pupils reported to school to begin classes through- 
it the system in grades one through twelve. More than 1,400 reported to an already critically overcrowded 
-gh school with all its attendant space problems, and the promise of an additional 500-plus youngsters when 
.ndergartens open next September made the opening of school appear to be a housing nightmare. 

le second event, which was more encouraging, occurred on November 2, 1972 when the voters of Wilmington, at 
Special Town Meeting, voted to authorize the taking of approximately 84 acres of land off Salem Street by 
linent domain, with the land to be used as a site for a new 1,600 pupil high school. At the same meeting, 
le citizens also voted to finance preliminary plans and architectural drawings for the proposed new school. 

this writing, the Permanent Building Committee is interviewing architects and the School Committee is 
■veloping the required educational specifications. 

is November action at the special town meeting enabled the School Committee to develop its School Building 
_eds Long Range Plan for the ten year period from 1972 to 1982. This long range plan was submitted to the 
hool Building Assistance Bureau of the State Department of Education at a meeting held on December 5, 1972. 

e long range plan divides the projected construction and rehabilitation program into five (5) priorities, 
suimnary of the plan follows. 

Our two most pressing problems in terms of a lack of classroom space are: (1) We are extremely 
overcrowded at the high school level; and (2) We must make provision for an estimated 530 
kindergarten youngsters who will be entering our system in September of 1973. The need for 
additional space is not restricted to just these levels. Our junior high and elementary programs 
are presently operating at capacity and, if nothing is done, these levels will erupt into major 
areas of educational deficiency. 

65 



The Wilmington School Conmiittee has offered several building options to the connnunity. Based on 
the action of the most recent Town Meeting, the School Committee proposes the following Long Range 
Plan to solve Wilmington's school building needs. 

Priority itl : Construct and equip a new high school facility on the Salem Street site which has 
approximately 91 acres. The school to be completed and open by September, 1975. The facility will 
be built for a capacity of 1,600 pupils with expansion capabilities to reach 2,000 pupils. The 
school will house grades 9-12. Our projected enrollments estimate that our 9-12 enrollment will 
peak at 1,660 in 1976 with, perhaps, a gradual and insignificant decline thereafter. 

Priority //2 : Convert our existing high school into a junior high school to house grades 7 and 8. 
This conversion, which will be completed by September, 1975 will adequately hold 1,000 students. 
Our projected enrollments show that our grade 7 and 8 student population will peak at 975 pupils by 
1975. The present high school, built to accommodate 900 - 1,000 students, is currently housing 1,404 
high school students in an Inadequate educational environment. 

Priority //3 : Convert the present West Intermediate School into an elementary school housing grades 
4-6. This facility will hold 475 students, and the conversion should be completed by September, 1975. 

Priority //4 : Convert the present North Intermediate School into an elementary school housing grades 
K-6. This facility should hold 475 students, and the conversion should be completed by September, 
1975. This priority would require some renovation at the primary grade levels, especially in the 
kindergarten areas. 

Priority //5 : This priority concerns converting existing elementary classrooms at the primary level 
into kindergarten rooms. These will be needed by September, 1975. The need is for twelve rooms with 
recommended locations as follows: 2 at Shawsheen, 2 at Woburn Street, 2 at Boutwell, 1 at Glen Road, 
2 at North Intermediate, 1 at Wildwood, and 2 at the Buzzell School. Some locations will be easier 
than others to convert, and some money will have to be appropriated for the task. Most, if not all, 
of the work can be performed by the Town Maintenance Department. ^ 

When schools open in 19 75, the elementary classroom distribution will assist the community in return- 
ing to the neighborhood school concept which proved so popular with residents in the past. 

These priorities, if followed to completion, will allow Wilmington to phase out three of its four small 
inadequate elementary schools. Scheduled to be released from service will be the Walker and Whitefield 
Schools, and either the Swain or the Buzzell School. 

Collective Bargaining 

The School Committee again entered into collective bargaining with teachers, administrators, secretaries, 
nurses, and cafeteria personnel on salaries and conditions of employment. The result was the realization of 
salary schedules and conditions of employment with the above groups which kept Wilmington in a competitive 
position with surrounding communities. 

Staff Recruitment 

Once again, the number of qualified teachers applying for jobs greatly exceeded the number of positions aval 
able. The School Committee, however, continued its active recruiting program in order to attract the most 
outstanding candidates and to maintain good relations with our area colleges and universities. The School 
Administration in attempting to fill available positions interviewed over 2,000 applicants from the followir 
colleges and universities: Boston College, Boston University, Bridgewater State College, Emmanuel College, 
Fitchburg State College, Gordon College, Harvard University, Lowell State College, University of Massachuset 
Northeastern University, Regis College, Salem State College, Simmons College, Springfield College, Tufts 
University, and Wellesley College. 

In addition to these institutions, information about the Wilmington Public Schools is distributed to many | 
colleges and universities in other states. This effort has successfully attracted candidates from all over'" 
the nation. 

Curriculum Development and Improvement 
The Committee, upon recommendation of the Superintendent of Schools, instituted several new curriculum 



66 



^novations including new textbook adoptions, additional course electives, in-service work for staff in 
movative teaching methods and the complete overhaul of the total testing program for all grades. The 
Dmmittee further instituted several new study committees to plan for such things as, the implementation of 
Lndergartens , the study of educational goals, as well as a study of the extended school year. 

:hool Committee Policies and Regulations continued to be revised and updated. 

Resignations and Retirement 
quests for leaves of absence and resignations were received from 40 teachers for the following reasons: 

Leaves of Absence : 



Sabbatical Leave 2 

Maternity Leave 10 

Resignations : 

Professional Improvement 3 

Family Responsibility 11 

Teach in Other Communities 2 

Career Change 1 

Counselled Out 6 

Retirement 5 



e School Committee wishes to acknowledge the retirement of five dedicated staff members who left active 
ofessional service at the close of the 1971-72 school year. All had devoted many years of service to 
e school children of Wilmington. 

a) Miss Mary Boutilier, Director of Reading, 26 years in Wilmington. 

b) Mrs. Isabelle Bums, Director of Special Education, 22 years in Wilmington. 

c) Mrs. Marjorie Ethier, Elementary Teacher and Building Principal, 26 years in Wilmington. 

d) Dr. Elene Farello, Chairman of the Science Department, 33 years in Wilmington. 

e) Mrs. Helen Martin, Head Nurse, 12 years in Wilmington. 

1 of these people had been extremely active in the profession, and they were well respected by the Committee, 
ninistration, fellow teachers, parents, and pupils. The Committee extends its appreciation to all of them 

r their faithful service and wishes each a happy and fruitful retirement. 

2 Wilmington Public Schools were in operation 180 days beginning September 8, 1971, and ending June 19, 
72. The Committee held twenty-four (24) regular meetings, eleven (11) special meetings, sixteen (16) 
stings relating to collective bargaining, and four (4) Budget meetings, making a total of fifty-five (55) 
2tings for the year 1972. 

; Committee extends its sincere appreciation to town officials, town departments, and to the citizens of 
Lmington for their fine cooperation and assistance during the past year. 



Superintendent of Schools 



On behalf of our Superintendent of Schools, Mr. Walter H. Pierce, I am pleased to submit the Annual Report 
of the activities of the Wilmington Public Schools for the year 1972. 

Superintendent Pierce is on Sabbatical Leave for the 1972-1973 School Year. He will return to his school 
assignment on August 1, 1973. 

HIGH SCHOOL 

In the High School, new courses of study have been introduced in the areas of Math, Science, and Family Lif« 
These programs will allow for greater individual course selection by the students and will provide them witl 
a more meaningful high school experience. 

Mathematics Department 

Currently, the Mathematics Department of the high school is offering a course in Probability and Statistics 
to students who have acquired a mastery of elementary Algebra. Recent and important applications of mathe- 
matics to the social and biological sciences have increased the significance of Probability and Statistics 
in our society. The need for more work in the subject has been recognized by the Commission of Mathematics 
of the College Entrance Examination Board, the Mathematical Association of America, and other groups. 

Twenty-two students have elected this course which is presented three times weekly for three credits. Usin; 
the language and devices of set theory, each student is informally exposed to basic ideas in sample spaces, 
probability assignment, and counting techniques. 

Science Department 

Following a trend of having teachers write their own integrated courses of study to suit local needs, a sub 
committee of the Science Department of Wilmington High School wrote the new Oceanography Course of Study in 
1971-1972 for use in grades eleven and twelve during the present school year. 

A team-teaching approach is employed since the course has been divided into four distinct disciplines; i.e. 
marine chemistry, marine physics, marine biology, and submarine geology, with individual faculty members 
teaching their specialty areas. 

This is a laboratory oriented course which has prerequisites of a least one year of biology and one year of 
chemistry. It was designed to incorporate field trips and individual research projects as integral parts 
of the program. Teachers involved in this program make every effort to insure that evaluative instruments 
assess not only the retention of factual data but also the ability of the students to develop meaningful co 
cepts from an abundance of scientific information. 

Family Life 

Decisions in Living is a dynamic new program which presently involves 130 students in mixed classes of 
sophomore, junior, and senior groups. Classes, which meet twice weekly for two credits, are on a Pass- 
Withdraw grading system. Through student participation, the small groups emphasize value clarification, 
decision-making, and communication skills. 



68 



Ktra-Currlcular Activities 
jccer 

le Wilmington High School Soccer team won the Northern Soccer League Championship with a record of 10 - 1 - 3 
id earned the right to represent the league in the Eastern Massachusetts State Soccer Tournament. The North- 
:n Soccer League is composed of the following teams: St. John's Prep., Danvers, Peabody, Lynn English, Lynn 
Lassical, Andover, Methuen, and Wilmington. 

1 the four years that Soccer has been a varsity sport, the team has compiled a respectable 34 win, 15 loss, 
\d 8 tie record. There is no doubt that Soccer is here to stayl.'I 

)otball 

le Wildcats led by tri-captains Leo Campbell, Alan Jansen, and Paul Olson went undefeated and won the Merrimac 
jlley Championship. It was Wilmington's sixth League Championship and fourth undefeated team under the lead- 
rship of Coach Fred Bellissimo. 

le Wildcats took nine of the twenty-two positions on the Merrimac Valley All-Star Tecun. On the offensive 
jam were Alan Jansen, Leo Campbell, and next year's tri-captain Dean Devlin. 

le defensive Wildcat All-Stars were Alan Jansen, Bruce McMillan, James McNally, Leo Campbell, Paul Olson and 
Lchard Barry. 

:i Captain Alan Jansen was voted All-Scholastic for Eastern Mass. 
)rk-Study 

le Work-Study Program continued to expand and revealed the following: 



Enrollment : 



Grades 7 through 12 - Highest total to 
date - 169 (Girls 71 - Boys 98) 
16 years of age and older 



Variety of Jobs : 



Girls - 



20 



Boys 



- 25 



Number of Working Hours 
per Week : 



15 to 48 



Rates of Pay per Hour ; 



$1.50 to $3.28 



Areas of Employment : 



Greater Lowell and Greater Boston 



e status of the 19 72 graduating class shows the following breakdown: 



Percent to four year colleges and universities 
Percent to less than four year schools 

(including nursing and technical) 



22.4 



21.6 



Percent to further education 
Percent to working forces... 

Percent to Service 

Percent to Marriage 



44.0 
50.5 
3.9 
1.6 



Listed are the colleges, universities, technical schools 
and nursing schools to which our graduates have been 
accepted for the fall: 



69 




Four Year Colleges and Universities 



American International College 
Bentley College 
Boston University (4) 
Clark University 
Emmanuel College 
Jacksonville University 
Kent State College 
Lowell Tech (2) 
Mass. Inst, of Tech. 
Mass. College of Pharmacy 
Merrimack College (2) 
Northeastern University (8) 
Renssalear Poly tech. 
Southeastern Mass. University 
Springfield College 



State College at Boston (4) 
State College at Bridgewater 
State College at Fitchburg 
State College at Framingham 
State College at Lowell 
State College at North Adams (3) 
State College at Salem (6) 
State College at Westfield 
University of Arizona 
University of Mass. (Amherst) (21) 
University of Mass. (Boston) (10) 
University of Miami 
University of New Hampshire 
Windham College 
Worcester Polytech. 



Less than 4 Year Schools 

Bay State Jr. College (3) 
Beth Isreal Hospital 
Burdett Junior College 
Butera School of Art 
Control Data Institute 
Embry Riddle Aeronautical Inst. 
Endicott Jr. College 
Essex Agricultural School 
Katharine Gibbs (2) 
Lawrence Memorial Hospital 
Lowell Academy of Hair Design 
Middlesex Community College (6) 
Mrs. Farmer's School of Cookery 
Mt. Auburn Hospital 

Northern Essex Community College (19) 
New England Hospital 
Solari School of Hair Design 
Tech-Age Business School 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS 



In our Intermediate Schools, three new courses are being offered. 

Until this year, French has been the only language offered at the Intermediate Schools, and its enrollment 
has been strictly limited to the top twenty-five seventh and eight graders in each school. New exploratory 
courses, which are electives, are now open to all seventh graders. This allows more students to elect 
French I or Spanish I in Grade Eight and to take up to five full years of one language. ^ 

"Comment allez-vous?" "J'aime beaucoup le francais." Vous etes formidable.'" " Como esta usted?" "Me gus 
mucho el espanol." "Yo soy muy inteligente . " are but a few of the foreign language sentences that are bei^ 
heard in the halls and classrooms of both the North and West Intermediate Schools, where over 75% of all 
seventh graders are enrolled in an exploratory course in either French or Spanish. These courses are being 
offered to introduce some of the fundamentals of foreign language learning at a much slower and less inten- 
sive pace than is usually required in a regular first-year course, and to give all students an earlier 
opportunity of discovering their foreign language aptitude, readiness, and interest. 

The Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (I.S.C.S.) laboratory science program, introduced as a seventh gil 
pilot program at the North Intermediate in 1971, has been expanded this year to the West Intermediate and j| 
taught at both seventh and eighth grade levels. 



70 



le I.S.C.S. program, which allows each individual student to work at his or her own rate, has been coordinated 

1 the science staff at each of the Intermediate Schools. The staff of each school meets regularly to discuss 
!thods, grading, scientific techniques, special problems, and new approaches in evaluating the students' 
;arning of science. 

18 students in this program do science; they perform experiments and see science at work. The key word in 
lis program is activity . 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

le appointment of two counselors to work in the elementary schools of Wilmington is one of the exciting 
ivelopments of the past year. Their duties include individual counseling, test interpretation, teacher and 
irent conferencing. It is a significant beginning in the area of preventive counseling. The earlier a pupil 
ceives professional assistance with problems related to school achievement, peer relationships, and home 
justments, the greater the likelihood of a positive shift in accomplishment and behavior. 

ience Program 

r the past several years, the Science curriculum in the Wilmington Public Schools has been in the process 
being completely updated and revised. This year the final stages of this revision process will go into 
feet with the introduction in the primary classrooms of our newly constructed individualized child-centered 
ience kits. 

connnittee of teachers and administrators have spent two years developing a better approach to teaching 
ience in the primary grades. 

th financial assistance from ESEA Title V and NDEA Title III funds, summer programs were held to construct 
e kits. The program consists of individual kits covering five complete units for each grade, one through 
ree. Each kit contains several lessons with enough duplicate materials to allow each youngster to work 
dividually Or in pairs. The kits also contain a large variety of audio-visual material, such as. Film- 
rips, Film Loops, Study Prints, Models and Transparencies to aid the teacher in developing the lesson, 
ring the course of each school year, every classroom will receive a total of five packages covering five 
fferent science units especially designed for that grade level. 

is new individualized child-centered approach to elementary science should help science become an exciting 
d fun activity for the children and, at the same time, be a concrete learning experience. 

SYSTEMWIDE 

najor step in improving our curriculum was undertaken this year. Recognizing the need to better provide 

2 students with a continuous twelve-year educational program, it was felt that we should have subject area 
icialists be accountable for their respective curriculum areas for Grades Kindergarten through 12, rather 
an dividing the responsibility between elementary and secondary. 

. Carol Sager, our new Director of Reading K-12, comes to us with a wide range of teaching experience, 
; has taught students at all levels — elementary through college. Dr. Sager has recently received her 
:torate from Boston University. 

: new Director of Science is Mr. Richard DeRosa who has been Science Department Chairman at Dracut High 
lool and, more recently, has held a similar position in Hudson, New Hampshire. Mr. DeRosa has assisted in 
i development of science courses currently being offered by the Air Force for their personnel. 

'.. Robert Romano, the Director of English K-12, has had nine years of both teaching and administrative 
Jerience. The position he held before coming to Wilmington was_ Chairman of the Belmont High School 
jlish Department. 

j amittees 

Iring this past year, various Committees have been formulated. The committees are comprised of teachers, 
ninistrators , and community parents. 

Educational Goals Committee was formed this fall. It was the committee's responsibility to analyze our 

"rent educational program and its relationship to a set of ten educational goals recently developed by the 

'ite Department of Education. The Committee submitted a report to the State Department of Education on 
l-.ember 8, 1972. 



71 



A Kindergarten Study Committee comprised of School Committee personnel, parents, teachers and administrators 
has been meeting weekly during this year. It is their responsibility to recommend to our School Committee, 
Kindergarten sites and a curriculum format. The State mandate stipulates that public school kindergarten 
must be initiated by September, 1973. The Committee has been inspecting various buildings in Wilmington 
with local and state officials to determine location, feasibility and suitability. 



Visitations to other Kindergarten programs in the state have also taken place. Seeing other programs in 
operation will assist in the development of a meaningful Kindergarten curriculum for our children. 



The School Health Services study committee has also been meeting regularly. With the assistance of State 
local Public Health officials, the Committee will be recommending a new approach to the School Committee fo 
the utilization of our School Nurses. The Nursing committee has utilized consultants and expertise from 
local citizenry. 

During the 1971-72 Academic year, a moratorium was declared in standardized testing for the Wilmington Publl 
Schools. Three committees were named by Dr. Stewart to assist him in reevaluating testing practices in 
mental ability, achievement and aptitude. After intensive examination of possible tests and consideration 
of various patterns of testing, the recommendations of the three committees were presented to the School 
Committee. As a consequence, students attending Wilmington schools are now systematically tested at least 
annually in the areas of academic ability, reading and mathematics. Additionally, they have opportunities 
to have their specific aptitudes and vocational interests determined at least three times between the 6th 
and 12th grades. Counselors, teachers, and administrators will be able to assist students and their parents 
in the continuing interpretation of these test findings. 

I have been greatly assisted this year in the Central Office by Mr. John Crisafulli who is Acting Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools during the term of Mr. Pierce's sabbatical leave. Mr. Crisafulli was formerly 
the Principal of the Wobum Street Elementary School. Mr. Joseph Connelly has moved up to Acting Principal 
at Wobum Street, and Mr. Richard DeRosas, a sixth-grade teacher at Glen Road, has assumed the position of 
Acting Part-Time Assistant Principal at the Woburn Street School to round out the administrative shuffle. 

To these dedicated men, I am truly indebted for their fine spirit of cooperation and excellent service. 

My sincere thanks go also to the School Committee, administrators and the total school professional and 
non-professional staff for their many significant contributions which help the school system to run in a 
smooth and efficient manner. 




Discussing school finances 



72 



Shawsheen Valley Technical School 



ular meetings of the Regional School Committee were held the second and fourth Tuesday of each month at the 
ool facility located at 100 Cook Street, Billerica. The terms of office of those comprising the School 
imittee are as follows: 



Names of Members 



Term Expires 



Charles Freni 
Joseph Rogers 

Kenneth Buffum 
Paul Heffeman 

Wallace Haigh 
John Murphy 

Mrs. Anthony Anderson 
Roy Curseaden 

Eugene Kritter 
Frank McLean 



Bedford 

Billerica 

Burlington 

Tewksbury 

Wilmington 



1973 
1975 

1973 
1975 

1973 
1972 

1973 
19 74 

19 74 
1973 



larch 28, 1972, an organizational meeting was held at which time the following officers were elected: 
Lace Haigh, Chairman; Eugene Kritter, Vice-Chairman ; Kenneth Buffum, Secretary-Treasurer. 

iirder to develop the guidelines for the operation of the school, from time to time various items such as 
[descriptions, dress codes for students, rules for conduct on busses, teachers' contract and other related 
■.ers are added to the school policy book. In response to requests by H. L. Paul, R.N., School Nurse, 
iges in the school policy were accepted, that up grade the health services offered to students and staff 
Shawsheen Tech. 

iccordance with the recently passed legislation, the school committee met with the elected members of the 
ent Advisory Committee to discuss matters of mutual interest. It is felt that this is a move in estab- 
ing communications between students and school committee. One of the items approved by the school com- 
ee was the modified dress code as submitted by the Student Advisory Committee and recommended by the 
rintendent-Di rector. 



oval was voted to continue the summer school program which moved to step two with students going four hours 
day over a period of six weeks receiving credit toward requirements for graduation. Authorization was 
n by the committee to establish a program for seniors from the five towns who are interested in acquiring 
ill to attend our school for half day sessions where spaces are available. 

ol Committee members approved a proposed House Building Project. This will enable students from Technical 
ting. Carpentry, Metal Fabrication and Electrical to experience the actual construction of a dwelling. 

73 



'I 



-I 




1 • 'J" ■' ."i 



In addition, the profits from this enterprise will go into a student scholarship fund. 

Practice teachers from Lowell State and Salem State Colleges have been using our facilities in order to meet 
the training requirements. 

Mr. Joseph Bastable was assigned in September, 1971, the responsibility of developing plans and specifica- 
tions of building an addition to the school. He researched this matter by examining the percentage of area 
students now applying for admissions and forecasting a potential increase of applicants for our school. 

Mr. Bastable met with school administrators, representatives of the five towns and the Department of Educatio 
to discuss the projected addition and to solicit advice and counsel. He developed a questionnaire that sampl 
opinions from teachers and students about what new programs should be offered, completed a survey of manpower 
needs from business and industries in the area, used statistics from state and federal sources, and establish 
an Advisory Committee of area professional men and women in the curriculum areas indicated in demand by the 
surveys of needs. 

As a result of the preliminary work, additional specifications were developed which call for increasing the 
building capacity from 700 to 1,400 and adding the following programs: Air Conditioning and Refrigeration, 
Cosmetology and Beauty Culture, Diesels and Heavy Duty Equipment Repair, Electro-Mechanical Technology, 
Graphic Arts, Allied Health, Child Care, Masonry, Photography, Plant Maintenance, Plumbing, and Small Engine 
Repair. 

In addition, the Division of Occupational Education has been requested to assist in approval of an Area Voca 
tional Coordinator who will help each of the five towns in the district to develop occupational skill progr 
that will not duplicate those at Shawsheen Tech. , but will supplement and compliment them. 

At this point the educational specifications have been approved by the School Building Assistance Bureau, 
architect has started to develop preliminary drawings. It is anticipated that with approval from the five 
towns, the addition will be ready in September, 1975. The committee voted to retain Korslund, LeNormand & 
Quann as architects. 

Arrangements were made for Dr. Ronald Saris, Research Division, Department of Education, to engage in a spec 
project that would provide information helpful in planning the new addition to the school. This project is 
to be funded by the federal government at no cost to the school district. 

The School Committee voted that the afternoon Occupation Skill Program be increased by one hundred twenty- 
five students in September. This will be the second year of the program in which some fifty odd students in 
Grade 10 are in the second year of this program. 

The committee approved appointments of coaches in the following areas: track, winter and spring cross coun 
football, hockey, basketball and soccer. In order to round out the staff of the school, the committee appoi 
an AV/TV Instructor and Placement Counselor. 

A contract was awarded for the purchase and erection of portable steel frame bleachers on the football field 
Approval was given for an additional hot food station thereby making it possible to establish a third servin 
line in order to adequately serve all students in the school. 

The Committee approved the continuation of the evening school program established last October. It is expec d 
that this program would be increased to meet the needs of the adults in the community. 

School Committee members met with the representatives of the Teachers' Association and concluded a contract 
with the organization that is effective until June, 1974. 

The Committee received $16,210 in federal funds in payment of the introduction of a multi-media system used 
in the Driver Education Program. 

The Educational Goals report as requested by the Department of Education has been developed in conjunction v ^• 
the Superintendent-Director. 

Bids for a three year contract to provide bus service effective July 1, 1973, were awarded to the Shawsheen 
Valley Transportation Association. 



74 



)uilding committee was established consisting of Wallace Haigh, Chairman; Kenneth Buffum, Charles Freni and 
jeph Rogers to meet with Mr. Bastable and the architects to develop plans for the new addition to the school 

is essential to realize that the facilities of this school should be utilized to the maximum extent. This 
; been apparent to members of the School Committee who have made every effort to approve programs that will 
lefit the youth and adults of the community. 

! complete acceptance of this school has not only shown the dire need for this type of education, but has 
)ven to the school community that the opportunity should be expanded or extended to give mo^e people the 
lefit of occupational skill training. 




Study of combustible engines 




Study of electronics 



75 



Superintendent of Shawsheen Tech. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT-DIRECTOR 

1972 saw Shawsheen Tech. in the second year of operation. In September, approximately 425 students applied 
for admission to Grade 9, however we were only able to accommodate 185. In order to fully utilize our faci 
ities, we were able to absorb another 125 in the afternoon sessions known as the Occupational Skill Program 
As of October 1, we had reached our full capacity, having 680 regular day school students, and approximatel 
180 students in the afternoon program. Because of this continued interest in our school, it was felt neces 
to take prompt steps to initiate the expansion program known as Phase II. 

Mr. Bastable, who had been Director of Vocational Guidance, has been developing this expansion program with 
the hope that the addition to the school will be ready for occupancy in September of 1975, making it possib 
to double the capacity of the school to approximately 1,400 students. 

COURSES NOW OFFERED 

Our present curriculum is as follows: Auto Body, Automotive, Carpentry, Chemical Laboratory Tecnician, Cul 
nary Arts, Distributive Education, Electrical, Electronics, Machine Shop, Metal Fabrication and Welding, 
Secretarial Science, Technical Drafting, Technical Illustration and Commercial Art. 

Since state and federal regulations require fifty per cent of the school time be devoted to shop and fifty 
cent to academic and related subjects, the following has been developed: 

Grade 9: Math — 2 sections. General Math and Algebra 

Grade 10: 3 sections. Applied, Algebra I, Geometry 

Grade 11: 4 sections. Business Math, Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry 

Grade 12: 5 sections. Business Math, Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry, Advanced Math 

including Trigonometry 

Grade 9: Social Studies — Civics, concerned with state and local government, political parties 

and elections, the court system and the Supreme Court. 

Grade 11: United States History, 1860 to present 

Grade 12: Consumers education, the citizen and his rights, minority groups, 

current issues and problems, etc. 

Grade 9: English — Linguistics and Literature 

Grade 10: Word mastery, sentence strength and punctuation. 

Grade 11: Community and the World, newspaper, vocabulary, literature. 

Grade 12: Corrective English, group leadership, public speaking and discussion groups. 



76 



ew physics program has been approved and is a requirement for all seniors. Physical Science for all tenth 
de students, which includes study of matter, atomic structure, energy, light, sound, space travel, earth 
ences environment, conservation of natural resources. 

addition, students engage in a physical education program in the well-equipped gymnasium. Students also 
e outdoor facilities which include a football field, paved running track, baseball diamond, soccer field 

four tennis courts. Those students who have difficulty in reading are assigned to the Reading Lab for 
cial assistance. 

completing our faculty, we have added an instructor for AV/TV and a Student Placement Counselor, and also 
instructional aide in the Reading Lab. 

JPATIONAL SKILL PROGRAM 

3 is the second year of our afternoon program which is called the Occupational Skill Program. The purpose 
to make available vocational education to those students for whom there is no room in the regular day pro- 
n. At present we have approximately fifty students in grade 10 and one hundred twenty in grade 9. These 
dents take their academic studies in their local high school and then are transported by bus to Shawsheen 
1. to take various shop training programs from 2:30 to 5 P.M. each day. 

iNDED SCHOOL YEAR 

srder to obtain maximum utilization of the facilities here at Shawsheen Tech. we instituted a six week 
ner program which was part of the regular school program, and was termed Extended School Year. I believe 
i/ere the first school in the Commonwealth to have received approval from the Commissioner of Education to 
aally institute this type of program. In the summer of 1972, we advanced into the second step of this 
;ram. For a period of six weeks, students attended school on a voluntary basis from eight in the morning 
Ll one in the afternoon. Three hours were devoted to shop and one hour to English and Math. In addition, 
re the shop facilities permitted, students were enrolled from the five towns. These were in many cases, 
.ors who were not going to college and were interested in acquiring an occupational skill, as well as 
;rgraduate students who were interested in some of the shop areas from the standpoint of exploratory 
irience. Because of the innovative characteristics of this program, Mr. Ayer, Summer School Coordinator, 
I have been working closely with Mr. Passios and Mr. Kyros of the State Department of Education in evalu- 
ig this program in order to insure its success. 

s hoped that for Step Three in the summer of 19 73, the full six hour school program will be adopted so 

full credit can be given to our students, enabling them to fulfill their requirements for graduation and 
iltting them to leave school sometime in the spring. 

: t program 

re entering the third year of a special pilot program for the training of twenty-eight students who have 
iing difficulties and have been in special classes in previous schools. The Division of Occupational 
"ation is very much interested in our project and we feel that considerable progress has been made in help- 
I these students. The key to this program is integration. Every effort is made to combine these students 
1 regular day s\:hool students in order for them to realize they can and should be like the other students. 

j ER EDUCATION 

ave been working with school administrators and industrial arts teachers in promoting occupational skill 
crams in the local high schools. These programs, once approved, will be funded by the Division of Occupa- 
cal Education. This will make it possible for many students to acquire entry level skills for entry into 
tjob market. In order to expedite this program, it is expected that an Area Vocational Coordinator will 

Jthorized in the near future. 

t ING SCHOOL 

estart of 1972 witnessed the activation of our Evening School Program. Close to six hundred adults had 
gitered in twenty-three courses requiring thirty-three teachers. Initially, classes were conducted on 
my and Wednesday evenings from 7-10 P.M. Due to the heavy demand in certain areas, the school was also 
Cid on Tuesday and Thursday evening. October saw the start of the second year of the Evening School Program. 
Idition to the regular courses, opportunities were offered in physical fitness programs for men and women. 



77 



A special innovative program in vocational guidance was initiated. This was called Project Explore and gavel 
an opportunity for adults to be tested by the Division of Employment Security and to be counselled in order 
to help the adult find what areas he or she is best suited for. Opportunity to get "hands on" experience in 
four different areas was made possible. Some eighteen adults signed up for this course, and it proved quite 
helpful to a number of them in order to help them "find themselves". 

SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 

The second annual Open House was held on May 17. All shops were in operation and the parents had an opportui 
ity to see the school as it is in function during a normal school day. A parent's visiting night was held 
shortly after the issuance of the first report card. This gave the parents an opportunity to meet the teach, 
as well as to discuss any problems. 

The first Regional Art Festival was held in our gymnasium on May 19 and 20. The special display boards were 
made by our carpentry students. Over 2,000 people from the five towns visited the festival. The quality of 
the paintings, sculptures, and drawings showed how much creativity the students who did them had. It is hop 
that this Regional Art Festival will become a yearly event. 

The Driver Education Program is a very successful operation in our school. We have received federal funds f 
the multi-media system which is used for the classroom part of this program. In addition, Fred F. Cain, Inc 
(Chrysler-Plymouth of Wilmington) cooperated in loaning us two 1973 Plymouth cars for the behind the wheel 
instruction. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

This is the first year that we have embarked on a full athletic program which includes varsity football, 
basketball, track and hockey. Intramurally soccer, lacrosse and tennis are also in operation. 

The football field was used for the first time this year, and stands were erected to hold one thousand spect 
tors. It is expected in the following spring that our carpentry shop will be involved in building a press b 
and a refreshment stand in order to complete the football facilities. 

Various clubs were started as part of our extra curricular program. Students are presently enrolled in the 
following activities: Yearbook, Dramatics, Photography, Ski Club, Chess, Cheerleading , Television, Gymnasti 
and Distributive Education Club of America. 

On June 8, a special athletic award assembly was held. During that time letters and trophys were awarded to 
the athletes. 

Robert Pease, student in our Commercial Art Department was honored by having his drawing accepted for the cc 
of the 1971 Billerica Town Report. 

This fall saw the continuance of the Junior Achievement Program. Student business organizations are sponsor 
by Purity Supreme and Raytheon. The adults from these two companies worked with the students from our schoc 
in making products and selling them. This gave the students experience in the world of business which was 
found to be most valuable. 

We are engaging in a project entailed in the building of a split level ranch. The plans were developed by j 
the Technical Drafting Department. Construction is to be done by the students in the carpentry shop, and I 
the electrical installations are going to be done by the electrical shop, and metal fabrication will instalJt 
the warm air ducts. The planning has been done this year. It is expected that next year we will see the c( 
struction and completion of this House Building Project. 

PROJECT INTERFACE 

In conjunction with the Middlesex Community College, we are involved in a federally funded project. The pu 
pose of the study is to determine how best the regional technical school and the community college can work 
together without duplicating courses of study or offerings. 

The Division of Occupational Education is extremely interested in this project since it is hoped that it wi 
develop a logical solution and establish guidelines for relationship between the community colleges and the 
regional technical schools. 



78 



■■ESSIONAL WORKSHOP 



;sheen Tech. was the site of summer workshops for teachers, sponsored by the Division of Occupational 
;ation. These one week seminars were for electronics teachers and for those academic teachers that are in 
)cational high school. Because of the success of this, we anticipate that we will again have these work- 
)s next year. 

.IC RELATIONS 

to the publicity received locally as well as nationally, through the medium of School Management Magazine 
18 1972), we have had a variety of visitors. Many of these are in the field of vocational education in 
state and are interested in the operation of our school. We have also had visitors from a team of educators 
1 the Province of Manatoba in Canada, Tennessee, West Virginia, and a group from Madrid, Spain. 

ipril 28 and 29, Shawsheen Technical High School was host for the annual convention of the Massachusetts 
.tional Association. Reports from the officers of the association related that it was a very successful 
ention. It was highlighted by a luncheon as well as a dinner that was prepared and served by the students 
he Culinary Arts Department. Dr. Joseph Cronin, Secretary of Education for Massachusetts, was one of the 
t speakers. 

unday. May 21, we participated in the Walk for Development. This charitable activity used our facilities 
a station on the tour, and luncheon was available in the school cafeteria. 

mber of organizations used our facilities for luncheons or dinner meetings. This included the Garden 
Federation of Massachusetts, Campfire Girls, Lions Clubs, Rotary Clubs and many others. 

LUSION 

importance of this type of educational facility is reflected in the very heavy demand by people of all 

to benefit from this kind of instruction. We have come to the realization that it is necessary to util- 
the facilities to its maximum in order to benefit as many people as possible. We feel that the success 
tie operation of the school is due to the concern and efforts of the School Coimnittee, the dedication of 
faculty and staff, and to the excellence of the student body who, combined, make this school one of the 
Canding ones of its kind in this part of the country. 




First and second graders at the Walker School 



79 



Housing Authority 



ORGANIZATION 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by the General Laws, Chapter 121, Section 26-K, as amended. 
MEMBERS 



Kathleen S. Patterson, Chairman 
Pearl H. Hersom, Vice Chairman 
Leo Woodside, Secretary 

STATUTORY REFERENCE 



♦ 



Charles F. Lounsbury, Treasurer (resigned) 

Raymond Spahl, Assistant Treasurer & State Appointee 



1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 of the General Laws, as amended. 

2. Act to provide Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 1954, as amended. 

BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 19 72 i 



ASSETS 

Accounts Receivable S/T $ 2,100.00 

Prepaid Insurance 744.31 

Petty Cash 25.00 

Administration Funds - 79.26 

Mechanics Savings Bank 6 , 371.62 
Development Costs $575,000 

Liquidated 103,000 472,000.00 

Total $ 481,161.67 



LIABILITIES 

Matured Interest and Principal 
Debt Service Reserve 
Operating Reserve 

Bonds Authorized $575,000 
Less: Notes Retired 103,000 

Total Liabilities 
Operating Deficit 

Total Liabilities & Deficit 



$ - 7,487.( 
20, 900. ( 
3,051.; 



472,000.1 
488,463.1 
7,301.' 



$ 481,161.1 



Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 



On Friday evening, March 24, 1972, the Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund Committee presented the St. Paul's 
Boy Choir in the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium in the High School, under the direction of Mr. Theodore Marii 
This is one of the superior boy choirs in the world. They have appeared at the Vatican in Rome, Notre Dame 
in Paris, Boston Symphony, and each year they appear with Mr. Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, presentin; 
the Nutcracker Suite. Twice a year they appear with Mr. Kenneth Wilson at the John Hays Hammond Museum in 
Gloucester. 

There are approximately forty-five boys, and they all come from the greater Boston Roman Catholic Archiocesi 
and parochial school system. This is the choir of St. Paul's Church in Cambridge. This program was well 
received by an enthusiastic audience. 



82 



Town Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 4, 1972 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

EETINGS: In the name of Che Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
id Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
fairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium Saturday, the fourth of March A.D. 1972 at 9:45 
clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the elec- 
Dn of Town Offices: 

riCLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: Two 
lectmen for the term of three years; Two Members of the School Committee for the term of three years; One 
ierator for the term of one year; One Member for the Wilmington Housing Authority for the term of five 
ars; and One Member for the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority for a term of five years and vote on the 
1 lowing Question: 

Question #1: "Shall licenses be granted in this town for the operation, holding or conducting a game 
commonly called beano?" YES NO 

1 are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Imington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 
Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday, the 
iventh day of March, A.D. 1972 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles:- 

accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan at 
>5 a.m. as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and ujjon a motion by Mr. Stanley Webber, it was 
:ed to dispense with further reading of said Warrant. 

ballot boxes were publicly examined by the Warden, Moderator, Town Clerk, Election Clerk, Ballot machine 
rators and the Police on duty. The three ballot machines were found to be empty and the register on each 
hine indicated 00000. Each ballot machine was then locked and the keys given to the Police Officer. 

Election Officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. 

Warden signed a receipt for 7500 ballots, the number said to be contained in the boxes of ballots which 
e delivered to him. The ballots were then delivered to the ballot clerks. 

Polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. by Mr. Webber, Warden and they were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. 
the Warden. 

re were Two thousand seven hundred and seventy-two (2772) ballots cast. Eighteen of these ballots being 
lentee . 

'■ of the ballots cast were sorted, counted, recorded and declaration thereof made as by law is directed, 
; were for the following, namely: 



i ECTMEN - Three Years (Vote for two ) 

l:ted Michael A. Caira, One thousand three hundred twenty-six 1326 

l:ted A. Daniel Gillis, One thousand two hundred sixty-five 1265 

George W. Hooper, Eight hundred thirty-six 836 

William D. Ready, Seven hundred thirty-nine ' 739 

Francis Sferrazza, Eight hundred seventy-one 871 

Others, Four 4 

Blanks, Five hundred three 503 



83 



7 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three Years (Vote for two) 

Elected L. Barbara Hooper, One thousand eight hundred thirty-three 1833 

Elected James A. Demos, One thousand two hundred eighty-six 1286 

Nancy A. Gable, Six hundred ninety-six 696 

Richard W. Thackeray, One thousand forty-nine 1049 

Others, One I 

Blanks, Six hundred seventy-nine 679 

5544 

MODERATOR - One Year (Vote for one ) 

Elected John M. Callan, Two thousand two hundred twenty- four 2224 

Others, Twenty-four 24 

Blanks, Five hundred twenty- four 524 

2772 



WILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY -Five Years (Vote for one ) 

Elected Emery G. Swindell, Jr., Two thousand one hundred and fourteen 2114 

Others, Seven 7 
Blanks, Six hundred fifty-one 651 

2772 



WILMINGTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY - Five Years (Vote for one ) 

Elected William F. Butt, Two thousand one hundred sixty 2160 

Others, Four 4 
Blanks, Six hundred eight 608 

2772 

QUESTION NO. 1 

"Shall licenses be granted in this town for the operation, holding or conducting a game commonly 
called beano?" 



Yes, One thousand eight hundred nineteen 1819 
No, Eight hundred fifty-five 855 
Blanks, Ninety-eight 98 

2772 



All the elected officials present were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by the 
Town Clerk. The only one not present was Mr. William F. Butt, he being on vacation. 



The results of this election were read at 10:45 p.m. 



Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 11, 1972 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan at 1:40 p.m. 
there being a quorum present. 

Rev. Allen H. Tadgell, Jr. led the meeting in prayer. j 
Mr. Oliver A. Aruda led the meeting in the Salute to the Flag. 

The meeting stood in silent prayer in memory of Mrs. Mildred A. Dolan, a town election member for years, j 

The Moderator began the reading of the Warrant and was interrupted by a motion from the Chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen, Mr. Carl A. Backman, Jr. : "I move that the Moderator dispense with further reading o 
the Warrant and take up and make reference to same by number." So voted unanimously. 



84 



JRTICLE 2. To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. 



o report offered at this time. 

RTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropriate 
sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation thereto. 

otion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appro- 
riate the sum of $13,987.29 for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years." Finance Committee 
pproved this motion. Motion voted unanimously. 

RTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
borrow money in anticipation of the revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 1972 and 
anuary I, 1973 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any 
ote or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with the provisions of General 
aws Chapter 44, Section 17, or take any action relative thereto. 

otion by Mr. Michael A. Caira, Selectman: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with 
he approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue for the financial years 
eginning January I, 1972 and January 1, 1973 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, 
action 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
ith the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, Section 17." Motion voted unanimously. (Finance Committee 
pproved this motion.) 

RTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries of 
iie several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
ransfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Jtion by Mr. Richard V. Barry, Chairman of the Finance Committee: "I move that the several and respective 
ams as recommended by the Finance Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and 
Dpropriated for the purpose set forth in Article #5, each item to be taken up separately and voted on, sub- 
;ct to amendment." Voted unanimously. 

XORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TAXATION: 



■NERAL GOVERNMENT 
Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries $ 2,500.00 

Expenses 8,000.00 

10,500.00 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 6,500.00 

Expenses 900.00 

Contractual Services (Motion by Selectman, George W. Boylen, Jr. VOTED 

("I move that we amend Selectmen, Elections by adding Contractual Services 
in the amount of $6,600.00" Finance Committee approved.) 6,600.00 

Amendment so voted. Voted as amended. 

14,000.00 

Registrar of Voters 

Salaries 4,300.00 

Expenses 2,650.00 

6,950.00 

Finance Committee 

Salaries 500.00 

Expenses 4,310.00 

4,810.00 

Town Manager 

Salaries: Town Manager 19,734.00 

Other Salaries 8,060.00 

Expenses 1,000.00 



28,794.00 



85 



Conffliunity and Economic Development 

Salaries $ l,500.0i 

Contractual Services 5,400.0' 

Expenses 100. Qi 

7,000.0 

Town Accountant 

Salaries - Town Accountant 12,812.0 

Other Salaries 7,736.0 

Expenses 525 .0 

21,073.0 

Treasurer 

Salaries - Administrative Assistant 11,365.0 

Other Salaries 7,402.0 

Expenses 1,775.0 

Tax Title Foreclosures 14,500.0 

35,042.0 

Collector 

Salaries - Collector 9,504.0 

Other Salaries 7,238.0 

Expenses 1,375.0 

18,117.0 

Town Clerk 

Salaries - Town Clerk 9,646.0 

Other Salaries 7,517.C 

Expenses 860.0 

18,023.0 

Board of Assessors i 

Salaries - Principal Assessor . 12,869.o| 

Other Salaries 15,503. 

Expenses 6,775. 

35,147 

Town Counsel 

Salaries (Retainer) 5,000. 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 7,500. 

12,500. 

Town Hall 

Salaries 6,352. 

Expenses 8,900. 

Capital Outlay 1,550. 

16,802. 

Planning Board 

Salaries 3,000. 

Expenses 900. 

Capital Outlay 400. 

Misc. Contractual Services (Prof. Services, Planning Consultant) 11,900. 

16,200. 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 244,958. 

PROTECTION PERSONS AND PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salaries - Chief 14,878. 

Lieutenant 13,190.0 

Sergeants 66,141. 

Patrolmen 241,625.0 

Traffic (Policewomen) Miceli motion to amend to 26,500 voted 26,500.0 

(Voted as amended. Motion to reconsider lost.) 

Clerk 6,879.C 

Miscellaneous Details 30,000. 

Police Dog Officers 800. 

Vacations (R.Barry motion to amend to 35,000 voted. Voted as amended.) 35, 000. C 



86 



Police Department (cont.) 

Sick Leave 

Paid Holidays 

Time & One-Half amended to read Time & One-Half and/or extra Police Officers in the 
sum of $25,000. Amendment LOST. Motion to lay on table VOTED. On 3/18/72 VOTED TO 
TAKE FROM TABLE. New Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that we amend the line item 
under Article 5 - Police: Time and One-Half to read Additional Police Officers and 
ancillary costs in the sum of $8,000." Amendment VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED 

Contractual Services 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Constable 

Salaries 

Fire Department 

Salaries (Chief) 

Deputy Chief 

Lieutenants 

Privates 

Call Fire & Ambulance 

Vacations 

Sick Leave 

Paid Holidays 

Contractual Services 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Civil Defense 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Dog Officer 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Building Inspector 

Salaries - Building Inspector ..... 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Joard of Appeals 

Salaries 

Expenses 

>ealer of Weights & Measures 

Salaries 

Expenses 



TAL PROTECTION PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



' iLIC WORKS 

own Engineer 
Salaries - Town Engineer 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 



87 



Highway Department 

Salaries - Superintendent $ 13,619. 

Other Salaries 133,722. 

Expenses 53,800. 

Capital Outlay 2,800. 

Maintenance Projects 

Drainage 25,000.' 

Sidewalk Program 50,000. 

Public Street Lights (Amendment that the sum of $50,000 be appropriated for Public Street 

lights, and raised by transfer from Free Cash VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED. i' 

Road Machinery - Expenses 24, 000. i 

Chapter 90 Construction 9,450.' 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 2,500.i 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Salaries 4,700.^ 

Expenses • 8,300.< 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries 35,000.' 

Expenses 44,500.' 

Capital Outlay 6,000.i 

413, 391. ( 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 15,386. 

Expenses 8,700. 

Capital Outlay 1,000.( 

Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 13,710.( 

Expenses 2,700.( 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 10, 076. ( 

Expenses 2,400.( 

53, 972. ( 

Cemetery 

Salaries - Superintendent 10, 299. ( 

Other Salaries (Amendment that the sum of 5,890 be raised by transfer from Sale of 35, 705. ( 
Cemetery Lots Account VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED. 

Expenses 20, 300. ( 

Capital Outlay 375. C 

Parks 

Salaries 3,000.C 

Expenses I,000.C 

Capital Outlay 2,500.C 

73, 179. C 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 579, 580. C 



HEALTH & SANITATION 

Board of Health | 

Salaries - Director 13, 150. C 

Other Salaries 24, 367. C 

Expenses 2,000.C 

Capital Outlay 250. C 

Hospital & Medical Care 1,500.C 

Garbage Collection 35, 000. C 

Town Dump 50, 000. C 

Drug Dependency Problems 11. 350. C 

137,617.0 



88 



TERANS' AID 

Veterans' Aid & Benefits 

Salaries - P. T. Agent $ 2,340.00 

Other Salaries 5,452.00 

Expenses 305.00 

Assistance - Veterans 80,000.00 

Capital Outlay 366.00 

88,463.00 

INTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

school Maintenance & Operations 

Salaries - Superintendent 12,869.00 

Salaries - Others 359,695.00 

Contractual Services , 54,120.00 

Expenses 24,400.00 

Fuel Heating 85,000.00 

Roof Repairs 25,000.00 

Capital Outlay 29,755.00 

590,839.00 

School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses 7,800.00 

Capital Outlay 11,215.00 

19,015.00 

Down Buildings Maintenance 

Expenses 38, 183.00 

Capital Outlay 3.430.00 

41,613.00 

:aL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 651,467.00 

tRARY 

loard of Library Trustees 
Salaries - Director (Amendment that the sum of 3,118.75 be raised by transfer from 

State Aid to Public Libraries VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED. 8,381.25 

Salaries - Others 41,022.00 

Expenses 40,300.00 

Capital Outlay 1,650.00 

91,353.25 

REATION 

Salaries - Director 10,500.00 

Other Salaries 41,187.00 

Expenses 19,875.00 

(Motion by Mrs. Charlotte A. Stewart: "I move that the amount under recreation expenses 
be amended from $8,905 to 19,875 for the purpose of partially supporting the following 
Community Youth Programs: Wilmington Pony League, Wilmington Youth Hockey, Wilmington 
Senior Little League, Wilmington Pop Warner Football, Wilmington Figure Skating Club." 

Amendment so VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED. 

71,562.00 

I IANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Salaries 1,500.00 

Expenses 108.00 

Contractual Services 50.00 

1,658.00 



89 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Personal Services 
Expenses .... 
Capital Outlay . 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Total Salaries 

(Motion by Mr. Walter J. McNamara: "I move that the School Department total salary account 
in the amount of $3,446,611 be reduced by $64,081 of available Public Law 874 and Public 
Law 85-864 funds leaving an amount to be raised by taxation of $3,382,530." Amendment so 
VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED.) 

Total Non-Salary Items 

Federal Monies 
Public Law 874 
Public Law 85-864 
Public Law 88-210 



VOCATIONAL TRAINING 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds 

(Motion - Amendment that the sum of $22,314 be transferred from Free Cash. Amendment 
VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED.) 

Reserve Fund 

(Motion _ Amendment that $24,930 be raised by transfer from Reserve Fund - Overlay 
Surplus. Amendment so VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED.) 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 6c Group Life 

(Motion - Amendment that $6,122 be raised by transfer from Group Insurance Dividends, 
and the balance of $71,878 be raised by taxation. Amendment so VOTED. VOTED AS 
AMENDED . ) 

Local Transportation 

Town Report 

Sewer Maintenance 

By-Law Study Committee 

Appraisals 

Collective Bargaining Negotiator 

Training & Conferences - In State 

Training & Conferences - Out of State 

Unpaid Bills 

Veterans' Retirement 

(Motion: "I move that the sum of $14,000 be appropriated for Veterans' Retirement and 

raised by transfer of $14,000 from Free Cash. Amendment so VOTED. VOTED AS AMENDED.) 

1972 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 

(Motion: "I move that the appropriation of $88,800 Salary Adjustments and Additional 

Costs be amended to the amount of $76,800 with $27,529 to be raised by transfer from 

Free Cash and the balance of $49,271 to be raised by taxation". Amendment so VOTED. 

VOTED AS AMENDED.) 

Indoor Skating Rink operating expense. (Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move to amend the 

Indoor Skating Rink operating expense to $45,000 of which $25,000 is to be allocated 
for Operating Expense and $20,000 allocated for anticipated interest on the bond 
issue." Motion withdrawn, so VOTED. Motion to lay this subject on the table was 
voted unanimously. On 3/18/72 VOTED to take Skating Rink operating expenses from the 
table. On Mr. Morris' motion, it was voted to pass over and take no action this line 
item. 

Additional Employees by Department 

Public Buildings 

Library 

Hi ghway 



90 



::LASSIFIED & reserve (cont.) 

Local Distribution of Federal Surplus Food $ 9,000.00 

(Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move to amend Unclassified & Reserve, by adding Local Distribu- 
tion of Federal Surplus Food in the amount of $9,000, Voice vote lost. Vote questioned. 
Standing Yes - 114 No - 58. Amendment voted. Voted as amended. 

lAL UNCLASSIFIED AND RESERVE 264,778.00 

rURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 633,937.00 

General Government (Motion - Amendment:"I move that the sum of $112,751 be appropriated 

for Maturing Debt £< Interest, General Government, said $112,751 to be raised by 

transfer from Free Cash." Amendment voted. Voted as amended.) 
kJater (Motion - Amendment: "I move that the sum of $110,410 be appropriated for 

Maturing Debt & Interest, Water, and that said $110,410 be raised by transfer from 

Water Available Surplus." Amendment so voted. Voted as amended.) 

lewer 27,305.00 

Interest on Anticipation Notes & Authentication fees 

(Motion - Amendment: "I move that the sum of $45,000 for Interest on Anticipation Notes 

and Authentication Fees, the sum of $1,979 to be raised by transfer from Accrued 

Interest, Sale of Bonds, and the sum of $43,021 to be raised by transfer from Free 

Cash with nothing to be raised by taxation." Amendment voted. Voted as amended.) 

661,242.00 

TOTAL BUDGET VOTED BY TAXATION $8,025,532.25 
TOTAL BUDGET VOTED BY TRANSFER 422,064.7 5 

:essed at 5:45 p.m. Reconvened at 7:50 p.m. 

■k on budget finished at 8:10 p.m. March 11, 1972. 

nCLE 6. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and 
jropriate for the purchase of the several following items of capital expenditure and further to authorize 
? sale or turn-in of the several items listed below, and for the use of the several departments so desig- 
:ed: 

:ion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate designated sums for the 
•chase of the several items of capital expenditure and to authorize the sale or turn-in of the several 
>ms so designated, each item to be voted separately." So voted. 
I. Police Department 

To purchase three Police vehicles and to authorize the sale or turn-in of three vehicles. 
Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the suin of 
$11,409 for the purchase of three Police vehicles, and at the discretion of the Town Manager 
authorize the sale or turn-in of three vehicles presently used by the Police Department. Motion 
VOTED . 

Fire Department 

To purchase a 1972 vehicle and to authorize the sale or turn-in of the present vehicle. 
Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$3,867.09 for the purchase of a 1972 vehicle for the use of the Fire Department, and at the discre- 
tion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a vehicle presently used by the Fire 
Department. Motion VOTED, 

Highway Department 

I. To purchase a 3/4 ton Pickup Truck and to authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1/2 ton Pickup 
Truck. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 
of $2,678.71 for the purchase of a 3/4 ton Pickup Truck for the use of the Highway Department, 
and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1/2 ton Pickup 
Truck presently used by the Highway Department." Motion VOTED. 



91 



ARTICLE 6. (cont.) 

2. To purchase a Catch Basin Cleaner and to authorize the sale or turn-in of a catch basin cleaner. 
Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 

of $4,900 for the purchase of a Catch Basin Cleaner for the use of the Highway Department, and 
at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in af the catch basin cleaner 
presently used by the Highway Department." Motion VOTED. 

3. To purchase a new motor and overhaul the transmission on the 12 ton roller. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 
of $4,000 for the purchase of a new motor and overhaul the transmission on the 12 ton roller 
presently used by the Highway Department." Motion VOTED. 

d. Tree Department 

To purchase a 3^ ton Chassis and Cab and to authorize the sale or turn-in of a 2 ^ ton chassis and 
cab. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$6,631.77 for the purchase of a 3^ ton Chassis and Cab for the use of the Tree Department, and at 
the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a 2\ ton Chassis and Cab 
presently used by the Tree Department." Motion VOTED. 

e. Cemetery Department 

To purchase a 3/4 ton Pickup Truck and to authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1/2 ton Pickup Truck. 
Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$3,690 for the purchase of a 3/4 ton Pickup Truck for the use of the Cemetery Department, and at 
the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1/2 ton Pickup Truck presently 
used by the Cemetery Department." Motion VOTED. 

f. Public Buildings Department 

To purchase a l\ ton Stake body truck and to authorize the sale or turn-in of a stake body truck. 
Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$7,136 for the purchase of a 1^ ton Stake body truck for the use of the Public Buildings Department, 
and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a stake body truck 
presently used by the Public Buildings Department." Motion VOTED. 

All of the above motions under Article 6 (a) through (f) were approved by the Finance Committee. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend "The By-Laws of the Inhabitants of Wilmington" by substiti 
ing therefor "The Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington" incorporated hereafter or 
in any other manner in relation thereto. 

Motion by Joan M. Bachman, Chairman: "I move that the Town vote to amend 'The By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
Wilmington' by substituting therefor 'The Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington', a 
in order to provide continuity that 'The By-Laws of the Inhabitants of Wilmington' shall remain in force 
effect until such time as 'The revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington' shall take eff 
all as provided by the General Laws of the Commonwealth." Motion so VOTED. 

Amendment by Mr. Callan, Moderator: "I move that the Revised By-Laws be divided into Chapters, discussed ani 
voted upon separately." Amendment so VOTED. VOTED as amended. 



The few small additions and punctuation noted throughout the By-Laws were read to the Town Meeting and are 
made part of the By-Laws. There were two Amendments - Chapter 5, Section 12 and the deletion of Section 36 
of Chapter 5. 



(NOTE: "THE REVISED BY-LAWS OF THE INHABITANTS OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON" as voted by the Town Meeting and 
subsequently approved by the Attorney General have been printed and are available to the public at the Towni 
Clerk's office.) 



Motion to recess, time being 11:20 p.m., and resume this meeting next Saturday, March 18, 1972 at 1:00 p.m. 
the High School Gymnasium. Motion so VOTED. 

On March 13, 1972 the Town Clerk put the following notice in the Town Crier on the front page, dated 
March 16, 1972 and in two editions of the Lowell Sun dated March 16 and 17, 1972 and posted said notice in 
five conspicuous public places in town on March 13, 1972: 



92 



LEGAL NOTICE 



e Adjourned Annual Town Meeting held on March 11, 1972 will be continued on Saturday, March 18, 1972 at 
00 p.m. at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts. 

ease be further notified that the two matters "laid on the table" namely: A. Time and one-half under Police, 
laries and B. Indoor Skating Rink operating exp)ense under Unclassified and Reserve, may be considered by 
e adjourned Town Meeting or at such further session thereof as may be necessary. 

(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
test: Town Clerk 



the March 11, 1972 meeting there were 510 voters checked in during the day and 343 voters checked in 
ring the evening meeting. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 18, 1972 

nual Town Meeting Adjourned to March 18, 1972 there being a quorum present at 1.25 p.m., the Moderator 
lied the meeting to order. 

rst order of business was a motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that we remove from the table Article 5, line 
em Time and One-half under Police." So VOTED. 

tion by Mr. Morris: "I move that we amend the line item under Article 5, Police, Time and One-half to read 
dditional Police Officers and ancillary costs in the sum of $8,000.'." Amendment so VOTED. VOTED as 
ended . 

TICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000 for the observance of 
norial Day and Veterans' Day and that the Moderator appxDint a committee who shall arrange and have charge of 
id observances or do anything in relation thereto. 

cion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: 'I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who 
all arrange and have charge of said observances." Motion so voted. 

2 Finance Committee recommended approval of the sum of $2,000 but advised the meeting that this sum does 
; cover the total cost of Memorial Day observance. 

riCLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 each (or a total of 
,250.00) for the purpwse of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as 
»nded, the lease of : 

J. Veterans of Foreign Wars' Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Nee-Ellsworth Post #2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

). American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Wilmington Post #136 of the American Legion. 

:. William F. Tattersall Chapter #106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, for the purpose 
of providing suitable headquarters for the Disabled American Veterans, or do anything in relation 

I thereto. 

l:lon by Mr. James F. Banda : "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
'0.00 each, or a total of $1,500.00 for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 
J Che General Laws as amended, the lease of: 

1. Veterans of Foreign Wars' Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Nee-Ellsworth Post #2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

>. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Wilmington Post #136 of the American Legion." Finance Committee disapproved. 

Ion voted by voice. Vote challenged. Standing: Yes - 101 No - 40 Motion carries. 

ICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the construction of a 
»manent pumping station at the Town Park well-field and to determine how said appropriation shall be raised, 
Ither by taxation by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or do anything in relation 
Ireto. Request of Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners. 



93 



J 

ARTICLE 10. (cont.) 

Motion by Mr. Blake: I move that the Town vote to appropriate $30,000 for the purpose of constructing a 
permanent pumping station at the Town Park wellfield, and that said appropriation shall be raised by transf 
from Water Department Account #1164 entitled Development of the Salem Street Wellfield." Finance Committee 
recommended approval. Motion so VOTED. ^ 

After Article 10 was completed, Mr. Morris moved that the meeting take up Article 17 at this time. So vote 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to appoint an Industrial Development 
Financing Authority for the Town of Wilmington and by so doing recognize that (1) unemployment or the threa 
thereof exists in the Town of Wilmington, or (2) security against future unemployment and lack of business 
opportunity is required in the Town, and that unemployment or the threat thereof can be alleviated or the 
security against future unemployment and lack of business opportunity can be provided, by attracting new in 
dustry to the Town or substantially expanding industry existing in the Town through an industrial developme 
project or projects financed under Chapter 772 of the Acts of 1967. The Town hereby determines that there 
need for such an authority and in making this determination, the Town Meeting has taken into consideration 
the Town's ability to adjust to any expected increase in the demand for municipal facilities and services e 
a result of the expected increase in employment and business activity from such industrial development, or 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to appoint an Industrial 
Development Financing Authority for the Town of Wilmington and by so doing recognize that (I) unemployment 
the threat thereof exists in the Town of Wilmington, or (2) security against future unemployment and lack c 
business opjxjrtunity is required in the Town, and that unemployment or the threat thereof can be alleviatec 
or the security against future unemployment and lack of business opportunity can be provided, by attracting 
new industry to the Town or substantially expanding industry existing in the Town through an industrial de- 
velopment project or projects financed under Chapter 772 of the Acts of 1967.- The Town hereby determines 
that there is need for such an authority and in making this determination, the Town Meeting has taken into 
consideration the Town's ability to adjust to any expected increase in the demand for municipal facilities 
Services as a result of the expected increase in employment and business activity from such industrial de- 
velopment." Finance Committee approved. 

After a great deal of discussion the Moderator called for a standing vote: Yes - 68 No - 127 Motion fai 
Motion for reconsideration of this vote was lost. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of Genera] 
Laws (Chapter 82 as amended related to the Layout, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of I*ublic Way 
and Specific Repairs thereon, which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plai 
therein are hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to e£ 
the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said ways and f 
the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land slope easements and other easements, therefor 
do anything in relation thereto. 

a. Dell Drive, from the southeasterly end of the 1958 Town layout a distance of 1,344 feet more or less 
southeasterly, southwesterly, northwesterly and northeasterly to Dell Drive again. 

b. Baland Road, from Ballardvale Street a distance of 545 feet, more or less, northeasterly to a dead 
end . 

c. Hopkins Street, from Shawsheen Avenue a distance of 3,100 feet, more or less, southwesterly to the 
Billerica Town Line. 

Motion by Mr. Carl A. Backman, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to accept as Town Ways, the layout of the 
following described streets, as laid out in the above Article #11, each to be voted separately." 

a. Dell Drive, from the southeasterly end of the 1958 Town layout a distance of 1,344 feet, more or 
less, southeasterly, southwesterly, northwesterly and northeasterly to Dell Drive again - $100.00. 
Finance Committee approved. Voted $100.00 to effect the purpose of this Article. 

b. Baland Road, from Ballardvale Street a distance of 545 feet, more or less, northeasterly to a dead 
end - $100.00. Finance Committee approved. Voted $100.00 to effect the purpose of this Article. 



94 



nCLE 11. (cont.) 

:. Hopkins Street, from Shawsheen Avenue a distance of 3,100 feet, more or less, southwesterly to the 

Billerica Town Line - $12,000. Finance Committee approved. Voted $12,000 to effect the purpose of 

this Article. Standing vote: Yes - 203 No - VOTED unanimously. 

nCLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue as a Town Way that portion of Andover Street that 
:ends beyond the limits of the sixty foot right-of-way from State Highway Route No. 125 northerly to the 
•therly end of the 1970 Town Layout, as recommended by the Planning Board and approved by the Board of 
.ectmen under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 82 as amended related to the Laying Out, Alteration, 
ocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways, and specific Repairs thereon, which discontinuance together 
:h the plan thereof is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which plan therein is hereby referred to 
■ more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to purchase, receive as a gift or 
:e by right of Eminent Domain such easements as may be necessary to protect the existing water main to de- 
■mine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by 
•rowing, or otherwise, and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of water easements, 
irefor, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ion by Mr. Michael A. Caira: "I move that the Town vote to discontinue as a Town Way, that portion of 
lover Street that extends beyond the limits of the sixty-foot right-of-way from State Highway Route 125 
therly to the northerly end of the 1970 Town Layout, as recommended by the Planning Board and approved by 
Board of Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws Chapter 82 as amended related to the Laying Out, 
eration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways, and specific Repairs thereon, which discontinuance 
ether with the plan thereof is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which plan therein is hereby 
erred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to retain the existing 
ement for the purpose of maintaining the existing water main, and that we vote to raise by taxation and 
iropriate the sum of $100.00 for the purpose of recording same." Finance Committee approved. Motion 
ED unanimously. 

ICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money by taxation by transfer 

m available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the purpose of constructing an artificial Ice Skating Rink 

which refrigeration equipment is required on land presently owned by the Town, being to the rear of land 
ated at Shawsheen Avenue and Hopkins Street, pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7, Clause 2A, and to authorize 

instruct the Permanent Building Committee to enter into contracts including architectural services, and to 
all things that are necessary for constructing said artificial Ice Skating Rink, and to transfer the care, 
tody, management and control of said land to the Selectmen, or take any action relative thereto. 

ion by Mr. Carl Backman, Jr.: "I move that we pass over Article #13 and take no action. Voted unanimously. 

|sr Article 13 was finished a voted came to remove a budget article from the table. Motion by Mr. Morris: 
DOve that we remove from the table. Article 5 line item Indoor Skating Rink operating expense under 
lassified and Reserve." Motion so VOTED. 

on by Mr. Morris: "I move that we pass over Article 5, line item. Indoor Skating Rink Operating Expense 
i;r Unclassified and Reserve, and take no action." Motion so VOTED. 

;;CLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be expended under the 
!Ction of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners, for the purpose of constructing sewers, interceptors 
I other necessary appurtenant structures in various locations within the town, and determine whether said 
lis shall be provided by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, by borrowing, or by any 
oination therefor; and to authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners to apply for and accept any 
■ral and State funds available as contributions towards the cost of such projects. 

on by Mr. Morris: "I move that we pass over Article 14 and take no action. Motion VOTED unanimously. 

'CLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, the Town Manager, and the 
ince Committee to act jointly in undertaking a comprehensive professional audit and analysis of all Town 
•unting records and financial procedures for the purposes of (1) completing such a professional audit and 

describe detailed professional recommendations for specific and comprehensive Improvements in the Town 
!em of accounting, data processing and financial procedures and management; and to implement said pro- 
iional audit, to engage and employ a firm of professional auditors with specific expertise In data process- 
fand financial management; and in order to accomplish said audit and analysis to see what sum the Town will 
IDprlate and raise by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or do anytiilng 

elation thereto. Request of the Finance Committee. 



95 



ARTICLE 15. (cont.) 

Motion by Mr. Richard V. Barry: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen, the Town 
Manager, and the Finance Committee to act jointly in undertaking a comprehensive professional audit and 
analysis of all Town accounting and financial procedures for the purposes of (1) completing such a profess- 
ional audit and (2) describe detailed professional recommendations for specific and comprehensive improveme s 
in the Town system of accounting, data processing and financial procedures and management; and to implement 
said professional audit, to engage and employ a firm of professional auditors with specific expertise in da 
processing and financial management; and in order to accomplish said audit and analysis that the Town will 
appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of $10,000." ^ 

The Finance Committee approved $10,000. Voice vote taken and declared voted by the Moderator. Vote doubte 
Standing vote taken: Yes - 107 No - 45 Motion so VOTED. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to accept, the provisions of Section 8A of Chapter 40 of the Gene I 
Laws as established by Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1954 and as most recently amended, and to establish a de- 
velopment and industrial commission consisting of not less than five or more than fifteen members with all 
the powers and duties thereof as provided in said Section 8A of Chapter 40 General Laws, or do anything in 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Section 8A of Chapter 40 of t 
General Laws as established by Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1954 and as most recently amended, and to establi 
a development and industrial commission consisting of not less than five nor more than fifteen members with 
all of the powers and duties thereof as provided In said Section 8A of Chapter 40 General Laws." Finance 
Committee approved. Voice vote called for. Moderator in doubt. Standing vote: Yes - 84 No - 126 Motlo 
lost. Mr. Enos called for reconsideration of this vote. Motion lost. 



ARTICLE 17. Acted upon earlier. 



ARTICLE 18. To see If the Town will vote to accept Section 8 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws, or do any 
thing In relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. William Hanlon: "I move that the Town vote to accept Section 8 of Chapter 40A of the General 
Laws." Finance Committee disapproved. Planning Board report filed. Motion lost by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 19. To see If the Town will vote to amend Section 1-2-D of the Zoning By-Law by adding sub-section 
5. High Density Traffic Business District shall be contiguous only with the districts denoted as 
General Business and/or Industrial. Or do anything In relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. William Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section 1-2-D of the Zoning By-Law by 
adding sub-section 5: 

5. High Density Traffic Business District shall be contiguous only with the districts denoted as 

General Business and/or Industrial." Finance Committee disapproved. Planning Board filed a report. 
Standing vote taken: Yes - 35 No - 113 Lost. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section V- 1 of the Zoning By-Law for requirements for 
General Business District: | 

Minimum Lot Area for Use Permitted without Appeal - 10,000 sq. ft. I 

Minimum Lot Area for Use Permitted on Appeal - 20,000 sq. ft. ' 

Minimum Lot Frontage for Use Permitted without Appeal - 100 ft. 

Minimum Lot Frontage for use Permitted on Appeal - 150 ft. 
or do anything In relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Grant: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section V- 1 of the Zoning By-Law for requirements 
for General Business District: 

Minimum Lot Area for Use Permitted without Appeal - 10,000 sq. ft. 

Minimum Lot Area for Use Permitted on Appeal - 20,000 sq. ft. 

Minimum Lot Frontage for Use Permitted without Appeal - 100 ft. 

Minimum Lot Frontage for Use Permitted on Appeal - 150 ft. 
Finance Committee Recommended approval. 

Planning Board filed a report. Standing vote taken: Yes - 127 No - 35 Motion VOTED. 



96 



RTICLE 21. To see If the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington so as to pro- 
ide for Planned Unit Development Districts and to regulate the same by adding the following sections and 
revisions to the aforesaid Zoning By-Law. 

. To add to Section I, subsection 1-2, paragraph A thereof, under the caption "ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION 
OF DISTRICTS" the following new district: 
8. Planned Unit Development Districts (P.U.D.) 

I. To add to section II thereof, under the caption "DEFINITIONS" the following definitions: 

2. DWELLING. Strike concluding period and add "or commercial accomodations offered for periodic 
occupancy." For the purposes of this By-Law, a FAMILY, as referred to in this paragraph, is any 
number of persons living together as a single economic unit and ordinarily using a single cooking 
facility; and the building or part of a building occupied by such a Family or Individual constitutes 
a DWELLING UNIT. 

14. GARDEN APARTMENT HOUSE. A detached or semi-detached building (a) containing not less than eight 
nor more than twenty dwelling units, each unit having independent cooking facilities and bathroom, and 
containing not more than two sleeping rooms; with no living quarters above three stories in height nor 
below the mean finished grade; with no more than four (4) dwelling units served by one outside entrance 
door; and (b) with a total facade not over two hundred and forty(240) feet in length; and (c) not less 
than thirty (30) feet from any other such building; and (d) Fifty (50) feet from any property line ad- 
jacent to any Residential Zone. 

15. STUDIO APARTMENT. A dwelling unit in a garden apartment house comprising of one room used for 
sleeping, living and dining purposes together with a separate cooking or kitchen area and a bathroom, 
and which contains a minimum of Three Hundred Seventy-Five (375) square feet of total interior floor 
area, and in which occupancy is limited to not more than two persons. 

16. ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT. A dwelling unit in a garden apartment house comprising one separate 
sleeping room and a separate living and dining area together with a separate cooking or kitchen area 
and a bathroom, and which contains a minimum of Five Hundred and Fifty (550) square feet of total 
interior floor area. 

17. TWO BEDROOM APARTMENT. A dwelling unit in a garden apartment house comprising of two separate 
sleeping rooms and a separate living and dining area together with a separate cooking or kitchen area 
and a bathroom, and which contains a minimum of Seven Hundred and Fifty (750) square feet of total 
interior floor area. 

18. ROW OR TOWN HOUSES. Attached single-family dwellings with vertical separating fire walls be- 
tween dwelling units, and in buildings containing not over ten (10) units and with a facade not over 
Two Hundred and Forty (240) feet In length. 

19. STORY. That portion of a building contained between any floor and the floor or roof next above 
it, but not including the lowest portion so contained if more than one-half of such portion vertically 
is below the mean finished grade of the ground adjoining such building. 

20. FRONT YARD. The open space between a building and the exterior line of each street or access 
driveway on the lot on which it stands abuts. 

21. FACADE. The Principal face of a building thereof; In a building with exterior dwelling units with 
an interior corridor therein, the front and rear walls of the building shall be called the Facade. 

22. SIDE AND REAR YARD. The open space at the sides and rear of a building and the boundaries, other 
than streets, of the lot on which it stands. 

23. SANITARY SEWER. A public sanitary sewer of the Town of Wilmington. 

24. MUNICIPAL. The word "municipal" means the Town of Wilmington. 

25. PUBLIC. The word "public" means the Town of Wilmington. 

26. FIRE PROTECTION AREA. The open space between a building in a Planned Unit Development District and 
a line parallel to and fifteen (15) feet equidistant from any such building, available for emergency 



ARTICLE 21. (cont.) 

access, within which no automotive vehicle may be parked and no building or structure may be erected 
without written permission from the Chief of the Wilmington Fire Department. 



in accordance with the Subdivision Control Law, which provides the principal access for vehicles to the 
buildings in the P.U.D. 

28. COMMON OPEN SPACE is a parcel or parcels of land or an area of water, or a combination of land 
and water within the site designated for a Planned Unit Development, maintained and preserved for open 
uses, and designed and intended for the use or enjoyment of residents of the Planned Unit Development, 
but not including parking areas or ways, public or private. Common Open Space may contain such com- 
plementary structures and improvements as are necessary and appropriate for the benefit and enjoyment 
of residents, occupants and guests of the Planned Unit Development. 

29. LANDOWNER shall mean the legal or beneficial owner or owners of all the land proposed to be in- 
cluded in a Planned Unit Development, or the agents or assigns of such owner. The holder of an option 
or contract Co purchase or other p>erson having an enforceable proprietary interest in such land, shall 
be deemed to be a Landowner for the purposes of this By-Law. 

30. SITE PLAN. Shall mean a plat of property and provision in written and graphic form, comparable 
to a Preliminary Subdivision Plan, for development of a Planned Unit Development, relating to the 
use, location and bulk of buildings and other structures, intensity or use or density of development, 
private access driveways or streets, ways and parking facilities, common open space, municipal services] 
and public facilities, and appropriate covenants, easements and restrictions applying thereto. 

III. To add to Section III thereof, under the caption "USE REGULATIONS" the following new section: 
III - 6. USES IN PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT DISTRICTS 

A. "Planned Unit Development District" (P.U.D.) is intended as a district for large scale, designed 
development, constructed, operated and maintained as a single entity under control of a Landowner, with 
single family dwellings, row or town houses, garden apartments or other arrangements of dwelling units, to 
gether with incidental or related business uses, access, parking and service areas, and common open space 
primarily for the residents of the Planned Unit; under a plan which may not correspond in use of land, lot 
size, bulk or type of structure, density, lot coverage or required open space with the regulations establis 
for any one district created under the provisions of this By-Law, but designed in a manner to create an 
attractive residential environment of sustained desirability and economic stability, compatible with the 
character established on the Zoning Map for the areas adjoining it; and to better adjust development to 
natural features of the site, with preservation of open spaces. 

1. Any and every Planned Unit Development shall occupy an area of land of not less than two hundred 
thousand (200,000) square feet controlled and to be developed by a Landowner as a single entity under 
the provisions of this section. 

2. The total number of dwelling units shall not exceed an average ratio of twelve (12) dwelling units 
per acre for garden apartments, or four (4) for row or town houses, or four (4) for duplex or two- 
faml ly . 

B. In a Planned Unit Development District, the Board of Appeals may issue a Special Permit for 
Exception on appeal as specified In Section VIII 2 B and as modified by the provisions stated below, 
for a Unitary development of any or a combination of the following uses: 

1. Any use permitted without appeal In a Rural District or In a Single Residence A or Single 
Residence B District, as permitted therein. 

2. Two Family, Duplex, Row or Town Houses and Garden Apartments, subject to the provisions stated 
below. 

3. Accessory uses, where the total P.U.D. area exceeds 25 acres, including office of physician or 
other member of a recognized profession, and drug store, barber and beauty shops, and similar In- 
cidental business uses primarily for the service and convenience of occupants of the Planned Unit 
Development; and providing such accessory uses not to be included In a residential building. 



98 



ilTICLE 21. (cont.) 

4. Common Open Space with incidental outdoor amusement or recreation uses devoted to or related to 
court games, golf, skating or swimming, but primarily for the use of residents or tenants or guests 
thereof in said district. 

5. Parking spaces as required in Section IV-3 as amended below. 

C. Any or all such uses shall be permitted in a Planned Unit Development only subject to the following 
mditions and in accordance with the procedure stated in Section VIII-2 below. 

(a) Each dwelling unit shall have Individual cooking facilities and shall contain no more than 
two sleeping rooms; there shall be at least six detached or semi-detached buildings and except for 
two-family or duplex, no such building shall contain less than eight dwelling units. 

(b) No living quarters shall be permitted above three stories in height nor below the mean 
finished grade. 

(c) All buildings shall connect with a sanitary sewer. 

(d) Utility wires shall be installed underground, conforming to Sub-division Rules and Regulations 
currently in effect in the Town of Wilmington. 

(e) Principal Access Driveways shall conform in gradients, paving materials, tum-arounds, curbs, 
sidewalks, easements, drainage facilities and street trees with the design and improvement requirements 
for Minor Streets in the Subdivision Rules and Regulations currently in effect in the Town of Wilmington 
shall be designed to have access on two streets when property lines butt two streets. 

(f) Off-Street Parking Areas. Two spaces for each dwelling unit in the P.U.D. project; parking 
spaces for other accessory uses, entrance and exit driveways, curbs, drainage, surfacing, lighting and 
screening, shall conform with the design and improvement requirements stated in Section IV-3 of this 
By-Law and found to be reasonably safe, convenient and adequate by the Town Engineer. 

(g) Bonds or Covenants for Performance Guarantee shall be provided in the same manner as for 
Subdivision. 

(^) Common Open Spaces shall be provided with an area equal to or exceeding the sum of those areas 
by which the area per dwelling unit is reduced below (20,000) square feet, or comprising 25% of the 
total area of the overall lot, whichever is greater; 

(I) No building facade, detached or semi-detached, shall exceed two hundred and forty (240) feet 
in length. 

(j) No building, detached or semi-detached, shall be located within a distance of thirty (30) feet 
as measured at a right angle from the exterior sideline of any sidewalk or any access driveway without 
a sidewalk. 

D. The preservation. Improvement and maintenance of Common Open Space shall be provided by: 

(a) Offer and conveyance to the Town by dedication of the land or of a conservation or other 
easement, interest or right-in-land against building or development; and by 

(b) Establishment by landowner of an organization for the ownership and maintenance of any Common 
Open Space not dedicated to public use. Such organization shall not be dissolved nor shall it dispose 
of any Common Open Space, by sale or otherwise (except to an organization conceived and established to 
own and maintain the Common Open Space), without first offering to dedicate the same to the town or 
other government agency. 

To add to Section IV thereof, under the caption "SPECIAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING USE DISTRICTS" the follow 

A. In Subsection IV-1 STREET FRONTAGE FOR DWELLERS - Insert after - "B District," "Planned Unit 
I'elopment -- P.U.D. District." 

B. l In Subsection IV-3, "OFF-STREET PARKING" at the end of the first sentence of paragraph "A" delete 
the period, substitute a comma therefore, and add the phrase "except as noted." 

2. At the end of the aforesaid paragraph "A" add the following new specification. "12. P.U.D. 
Districts, two (2) spaces on the premises for each dwelling unit, and reasonably accessible thereto." 

C. In Subsection IV-4, under the caption "SCREENING OF OPEN USES" at the end of the first sentence 
delete the period, substitute a comma therefore, and add the following: "or a Planned Unit Development 
District. Such screening shall also be provided in a Planned Unit Development District between an 



99 



ARTICLE 21 (cont.) 

open parking area provided for the use of residents of an apartment building and a Rural, Single 
Residence A. Single Residence B where any such parking area is located within fifty (50) feet of the 
zoning district boundary." 

V. To add to Section V, Subsection V- I thereof, under the caption "HEIGHT, AREA AND YARD REGULATIONS", the 



following new 


schedule of 


Requirements : 




A. 


Under 


the 


heading 


"District" the words Planned Unit Development District 


(P.U.D.) 


B. 


Under 


the 


heading 


"Minimum Lot Area" for Use on Appeal 200,000 Sq . Ft. 




C. 


Under 


the 


heading 


"Minimum Lot Frontage for Use Permitted on Appeal" the 


words "200 feet"; 


D. 


Under 


the 


heading 


'Maximum Height" the words "3 stories or 38 feet"; 




E. 


Under 


the 


heading 


"Minimum Set-Back from Center Line of Street" the words 


"65 feet from Center 



Line of a public way outside or abutting the lot within which said buildings are contained, and 50 
feet from Center Line of any access driveway within the Development." 

F. Under the heading "Minimum Front Yard Depth" the words "40 feet" along public way; and "30 feet" 
from a Principal access driveway. 

G. Under the heading "Minimum Width for each Sideyard" the words "50 feet from a residential district 
or 30 feet from a non-residential district." 

H. Under the heading "Minimum Rear Yard Depth", the words "50 feet from a residential district or 
30 feet from a non-residential district." 

I. Under the heading "Minimum Lot Depth" the words "300 feet"; 

J. Under the heading "Maximum Lot Coverage for Buildings or Structures," the words "25 per cent." 

VI. To add to Section V, Subsection V-4 thereof, under the caption "SET BACK AND YARDS" the following: 

In paragraph D, in the first sentence, after the phrase "in any District" and before the word "no" 
insert the words "except in a Planned Unit Development District"; 

VII. To add to Section VIII, subsection VIII-2, under the caption "APPEAL", the following: 

E. PROCEDURE FOR APPLICATION FOR FINDING AND DETERMINATION. 

(a) No building for any of the uses permitted by the terms of the revised section III-6A above 
shall be constructed or reconstructed or substantially altered externally or added to, unless the 
Board of Appeals, after a public hearing and after consideration of the written recommendations 
of the Planning Board and the Town Engineer, shall have made a finding and determination that the 
proposed Planned Unit Development complies with the requirements of this By-Law, that the Plans 
are adequate for the reasonable protection of the public safety, health, and morals as specified 
in paragraph "b" below. 

(b) Landowners seeking approval and authorization to establish a Planned Unit Development shall 
file an application therefor with the Town Clerk with six (6) copies of each Site Plan and Written 
Statement covering: (I) the location and size of the site and the nature of the Landowner's 
interest in the land proposed to be developed; (2) the density of land use to be allocated to 
parts of the site to be developed; (3) the location and size of any Common Open Space and the 
form of organization proposed to own and maintain any Common Open Space; (4) the uses of land 

and buildings and the approximate height, bulk and location of buildings and other structures; 
(5) the proposals for the disposition of sanitary waste and storm water; (6) the substance of 
covenants, grants of easements or other restrictions proposed to be imposed upon the use of the 
land, buildings and structures including proposed easements or grants for public utilities; 
(7) the provisions for vehicular access, parking of vehicles, and the location and width of 
proposed streets, public ways and private access driveways; (8) the proposals for screening and 
topographical changes; and (9) in the case of Plans which call for the development over a period 
of years, a schedule showing the proposed construction schedules and approximate dates, within 



100 



ICLE 21. (cont.) 

which applications for final approval of all sections of the Planned Unit Development are intended 
to be filed. 

The application for a Planned Unit Development shall include a written statement by the Landowner 
setting forth the reasons why, in his opinion, a Planned Unit Development would be in the public 
interest and would be consistent with the General Plan for Wilmington. 

(c) REFERENCE. Upon receipt of application and site plan by the Town Clerk, the said Town Clerk 
shall make a record of the date and time of receipt thereof, and shall within five days (Saturdays, 
Sundays and holidays excluded) transmit to the Planning Board two copies of said application and 
site plan, to the Town Engineer one copy of said application and site plan, and to the Board of 
Appeals and Building Inspector one each copy of said application and site plan. Said transmission 
to the Board of Appeals shall constitute an "Appeal for Special Permit of Exception" as provided 

in Section III-5A above. 

(d) PUBLIC HEARING. Immediately upon receipt of an application and site plan in accordance with 
this section, the Board of Appeals shall schedule within thirty-five (35) days an advertised public 
hearing thereon in accordance with the procedures specified in sections six and seventeen of 
Chapter 40A of the General Laws. 

(e) REVIEW AND REPORTS. The Planning Board and the Town Engineer shall each consider the applica- 
tion and site plan and shall each submit, within forty-five (45) days, a written rejxirt thereon 
with the recommendations to the Board of Appeals. 

(1) The Planning Board shall set forth with particularity in what respects the Plan would 
or would not be in the public interest including but not limited to findings of fact and con- 
clusions on the following: 

(a) In what respects the Plan is or is not consistent with the statement of objectives 
of a Planned Unit Development (Section III-6A) and of the General Plan for the Town. 

(b) The extent to which the Plan departs from zoning and sub-division regulations 
otherwise applicable to the subject property, including but not limited to density, 
bulk and use, and the reasons why such departures are or are not deemed to be in the 
public interest. 

(c) The purpose, location, uses and amount of the Common Open Space in the Planned 
Unit Development, the reliability of the proposals for maintenance, preservation, 
and conservation of the Common Open Space, and the adequacy or inadequacy of the 
amount and purpwse of the Common Open Space as related to the proposed density and 
type of residential development. 

(d) The physical design of the Plan and the manner in which said design does or does 
not make adequate provision for public service, provide adequate access and control 
over vehicular traffic, and further the amenities of light and air, recreation and 
visual enjoyment. 

(e) The relationship, beneficial or adverse, of the proposed Planned Unit Develop- 
ment to the neighborhood in which it is proposed to be established; and 

(f) In the case of a Plan which proposed development over a period of years, the 
sufficiency of the terms and conditions intended to protect the interests of the 
public and of the residents of the Planned Unit Development in the integrity of 
the Plan. 

(2) In addition the Planning Board shall review with the Town Engineer and endorse his 
recommendations and/or offer its own recommendations concerning matters in his report, 
with particular reference to: 

(a) All aspects of the Plan relating or similar to a Subdivision Plan, including 
access, drainage, waste disposal, topographic changes, etc., specifications for 
paving, drains, water, etc., and performance bond. 

(b) Recommendations of "conditions" which should be considered for inclusion in the 
Findings by the Board of Appeals. 

(3) The Town Engineer shall report on 

(a) All aspects of the Plan relating or similar to a Subdivision Plan as noted above. 



101 



ARTICLE 21. (cont.) 

(b) All elements of the Site Plan concerning Parking under the revised provisions 
of Section IV-3, provided, however, that the required findings and determination of 
the Town Engineer as to all matters specified in Section IV-3 shall be binding upon 
the Board of Appeals; and 

(c) Such other provisions of the Site Plan and Written Statement as he may deem 
appropriate; together with 

(d) Such recommendations of "conditions" which should be considered for inclusion 
in the "Findings" of the Board of Appeals. 

(4) The Board of Appeals shall not make a finding and determination upon an application unti 
it has received the final written reports of the Planning Board and Town Engineer thereon or 
forty-five (45) days shall have elapsed since the transmittal of said copies of the applicatii 
and site plan to the Planning Board and Town Engineer without such reports being submitted. 

F. The Board of Appeals shall take final action on an application and site plan within sixty (60) day 
after the filing thereof with the Town Clerk by the Landowner. 

(1) If the Board of Appeals shall fail to take final action as aforesaid within sixty (60) days, the 
Board of Appeals shall be deemed to have made a finding and determination that the proposed site plan 
is adequate for the reasonable protection of public safety and health in the proposed use of the site. 

(2) The final action by the Board of Appeals shall consist of either (1) a finding and determination 
that the proposed site plan is adequate for the reasonable protection of public safety and health in 
the proposed use of the site, or (2) a written denial of the application and site plan for such findin; 
and determination, stating in detail the reasons for said denial and wherein any elements in and any 
particular features of the application and site plan are deemed to be inadequate, and further speci- 
fying in detail each and every change and modification in said application and site plan together with 
with the reasons therefore, which if accepted by the applicant and incorporated in or applied to said 
application and site plan, would result in a finding and determination by the Board of Appeals that 
said application and site plan is adequate for the reasonable protection of public safety and health 
in the proposed use of the site. 

(3) In the event the Board of Appeals makes such finding and determination, such use, extension, erec! 
or enlargement shall be carried on only in essential conformity with the application and site plan on 
the basis of which the said finding and determination is made. 

(4) The Board of Appeals may, in its discretion, instead of denying the application and site plan, 
make said finding and determination subject to stated, reasonable conditions and restrictions in 
writing, which, if assented to by the applicant in writing, shall be deemed to have been incorporated 
into and made a part of the application and site plan, without requiring the applicant to submit or 
resubmit a modified or amended application and site plan. 

(5) The period within which final action shall be taken may be extended for a definite period by mutu 
consent of the Board of Appeals and the applicant. In the event the Board of Appeals determines that 
site plan is inadequate to permit it to make a finding and determination, it may, in its discretion, i 
stead of denying the application, extend the period to a later date to permit the applicant to submit 
revised site plan or application, provided, however, that such period is extended to a day certain by 
mutual consent. Periods of extensions shall not exceed a total of six (6) months without resubmission 



(6) The Board of Appeals shall file with its records a written report of its final action on each app 
cation, with reasons therefore. A copy of each report shall also be filed with the Town Clerk, the 
Planning Board, the Town Engineer, the Building Inspector and the Board of Selectmen. A copy of each 
application and its accompanying site plan shall likewise be filed with the Building Inspector. 

(7) Prior to submission of the application, the applicant shall have made application for all license 
incidental to the proposed accessory uses. 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Zane Bower to adopt the above Article 21. Finance Committee - no recommendations at the tin 
going to press. Planning Board filed a report. Mr. Leahy, a member of the Planning Board filed a 'minorl 
report, disapproving. 



102 



(TICLE 21 (cont.) 

-. Bower showed the meeting charts he had prepared and used up his ten minutes. A motion came to allow him 
lother ten minutes to finish his presentation. Standing vote: Yes - 113 No - 4 So VOTED. Amendment by 
■. Webber to refer this article to the Selectmen to be presented at a Special or the next Annual Town 
meting. After some discussion this amendment to refer was LOST by a voice vote. The vote on the Main 
ition was taken by standing: Yes - 24 No - 187 Motion Lost. Motion to reconsider this vote was taken by 
lice and was declared Lost unanimously by the Moderator. 

le meeting complemented Mr. Zane Bower for all the work he put into this article and his fine presentation. 

[TICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by striking out in its entirety Section 
II - Enforcement, Appeal, Amendment and inserting in its place the following: 

SECTION VIII - Administration, Enforcement and Amendment 

II-l The Building Inspector shall administer, execute and enforce the provisions of this By-Law, except 
where otherwise provided, through interpretation and application of the provisions thereof. In so 
doing he shall have the same powers as are provided to execute and enforce the Building Laws of the 
town. He shall approve no application, plan, or permit, or the specifications thereof, except in 
conformity with this by-law. 

II-2 Permits 

A. Permits Required: 

It shall be unlawful ^for any owner or person to erect, construct, reconstruct, convert or 
alter a structure or change the use, increase the intensity of use, or extend or displace 
the use of any building, other structure or lot without applying for an receiving from the 
Building Inspector the required permit therefor. 

B. Permit Applications: 

For purposes of administration, permit and application procedure involving a structure may 
be made at the same time and combined with the permit required under the Building Laws. 
Any application for a permit shall be accompanied by plans and specifications in duplicate, 
showing the actual shape and dimensions of the lot to be built upon, the exact location and 
size of all buildings or structures already on the lot, together with the lines within which 
all buildings or structures are to be erected, the existing and intended use or uses of each 
building, structure or area within the lot. 

Where the application does not involve a structure but only a lot, a permit shall be applied 
for and may be issued. In addition to plot plans and drawings required for submission under 
regulations of the Building Code, plans and information also for off-street parking, land- 
scaping, loading, sewerage and filling shall be filed as may be necessary, under provisions 
for Site Plans in Section IV-3 E and F, as herinbefore specified, or otherwise to provide for 
the execution and envorcement of this by-law. 

Applications for a Special Permit for Exception which may be authorized by the Board of Appeals 
for uses under Sections III-IB, III-2B, III-3B, III-4B, III-5B and Section V-2 or elsewhere in 
this By-law as "on appeal by the Board of Appeals" shall be made to the Building Inspector on 
an appropriate form secured from the Building Inspector, the Town Engineer or the Town Clerk 
filed with the Town Clerk. 

C. Permit Time Limit 

A permit shall be obtained by the applicant within 180 days of the date of authorization by 
the Board of Apjjeals or become void. Any work for which a p>ermit has been issued by the Build- 
Inspector shall be actively prosecuted within 180 days and completed within one year of the 
date of the issuance of the permit. A permit issued for a project which is actively prose- 
cuted for one year may be extended an additional year at the discretion of the Building 
Inspector. 

D. Occupancy Permits 

No premises, and no building erected, altered, or in any way changed as to construction or 
use, under a permit or otherwise, shall be occupied or used without an occupancy permit signed 
by the Building Inspector, which permit shall not be issued until the premises, building, or 
structure, and its uses and accessory uses comply in all respects with this by-law. 



103 



ARTICLE 22. (cont.) 

E. Permit Records 

A record of all such applications, plans, and permits shall be kept on file by the Building 
Inspector. 

VIII-3. Violations and Penalties 

A. Violations 

The Building Inspector shall serve a notice of VIOLATION AND ORDER to any owner responsible for 
the erection, construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, conversion, maintenance, or use 
of any building or other structure, or use of any lot in violation of the provisions of this 
By-law, or in violation of any approved plan, drawing, information, or drawing pertinent thereto; 
or in violation of a permit or certificate issued under the provisions of this By-law; and such 
order shall direct the discontinuance of the unlawful action, use or condition, and the abatement 
of the violation within a time to be specified by him. Any owner, who having been served with a 
notice and who ceases any work or other activity, shall not leave any structure or lot in such 
conditions as to be a hazard or menace to the pwblic safety, health morals, or general welfare. 
The Building Inspector shall have the power to require that such premises be put in such condi- 
tion as he directs. 

B. Violation Penalty 

Whoever shall violate or cause to be violated any provision of this by-law shall be subject to a 
fine not to exceed fifty (50) dollars for each day of the continuance of such violation. | 

VIII-4. Board of Appeals 

A. Established: 

The Board of Appeals heretofore established under the zoning by-law previously in effect shall 
continue as the Board of Appeals under this by-law and under Division 1, Section 7 of the Build- 
ing Laws of the Town. The members and associate members thereof shall continue in office for 
the duration of their appointed terms. 

B. General Powers and Duties: 

The Board as hereinbefore specified shall have the same powers and duties as are provided in the 
Building Laws of the town and all the powers and duties under the applicable provisions of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and of this by-law as specified herein. 

1. Rules. The Board shall adopt rules, not inconsistent with the provisions of this zoning 
by-law, for conducting its business and otherwise carrying out the purpose of Chapter 40A G.L., 
and shall file a copy of such rules in the office of the town clerk. 

2. Meetings of the Board shall be held at the call of the chairman, and also when called in 
such other manner as the board shall determine in its rules. All Hearings shall be open to the 
Public. 

3. Notice of decisions shall be given as required in Section 18 of Chapter 40A - G.L. to 
parties in interest, the landowner, Planning Board, etc. and filed with the Town Clerk. 
"No variance or permit shall take effect until such notice is recorded in the Middlesex 
County Registry of Deeds." 

4. Records. "The Board shall cause to be made a detailed record of its proceedings showing 
the vote of each member upon each question, or, if absent or failing to vote, indicating such 
fact, and setting forth clearly the reason or reasons for its decisions, and of its other 
official actions, copies of all of which shall be immediately filed in the office of the 
town clerk and shall be a public record." Chap. 40A - G.L. 

The Board shall, with the advice and assistance of the Building Inspector, maintain and keep 
up-to-date a map indicating, by means of appropriate symbols, colors, or other notations, the 
locations in which it has taken approving or disapproving action. 

C. Particular Powers 

The Board of Appeals shall have pwwers to: 

1. Hear and decide appeals taken from any order, decision, or determination, made by the 
Building Inspector in the execution and enforcement of this by-law. 

2. Grant Special Permits for Exception to an applicant, "in appropriate cases and subject to 
appropriate conditions and safeguards,... to make use of his land or to erect and maintain 



104 



TICLE 22. (continued) 

buildings or other structures thereon in accordance with such an exception." Chap. 40A G.L. 
Special Permits may be authorized by the Board for uses under Sections III-lB, III-2B, 
III-JB, III-4B, III-5B and Section V-2 or elsewhere in this By-law as "on appeal by the Board 
of Appeals" under the following procedure: 

a) Application to the Building Inspector on the appropriate form and filed with the Town Clerk. 

b) Reference of the application to the Town Planning Board for a report thereon. Said report 
shall set forth, insofar as practicable, the probable effect of or need for such use, within 
the general area thereof, or within the town, and may contain suggestions or recommendations 
relating to the establishment of any such use. The report shall be submitted to the Board of 
Appeals within forty-five (45) days after receipt by the Planning Board of the notice of the 
filing of any request under the sections affected. If such submission is not made within the 
period required, a rejxjrt favorable to the establishment of the use shall nevertheless be 
deemed to have been made . 

c) Public Hearing, notice of which shall be given in accordance with the provisions of Section 
XVII of Chapter 40A G.L. and of this By-Law. 

d) The decision of the Board shall be made within sixty days after the date of the filing of 
an appeal application or petition (Chap. 40A G.L.). 

e) In acting upon an application for a Special Permit, the Board shall take into consideration 
whether 

1) the specific site is an appropriate location for the use or structure; 

2) the use developed will adversely affect the neighborhood; 

3) there will be undue nuisance or serious hazard to vehicles or pedestrians, and 
adequate and appropriate facilities will be provided to ensure the proper operation of 
of the profKjsed use, structure, or condition; 

4) the proposed use or structure will be in harmony with the general purpose of this 
By-law; 

5) the recommendations of the Planning Board. 

f) The Board may impose additional conditions on any Special Permit to limit, arrange, and ad- 
just uses and structures as it finds reasonably appropriate to safeguard the neighborhood or 
otherwise serve the purposes of this By-law, including but not limited to, the following: front, 
side, or rear yards greater than the minimum required by this By-law, screening, buffers or 
planting strip, fences, or walls, as specified by the Board; modification of the exterior 
appearance of the structure; limitation upon the size, humber of occupants, method and time 

of operation, or extent of facilities; regulation of number and location of drives, access- 
ways, or other traffic features; and off-street parking or loading, or other special features 
beyond the minimum required in this By-law. 

g) The Board shall grant a Special Permit only when it finds in a written report filed with the 
Town Clerk that the proposed use or structure - 

1) will be in conformance with the limitations and conditions for such use prescribed 
in the listing of uses in Section III of this by-law; 

2) will not adversely effect the neighborhood; 

3) will not create a nuisance or serious hazard to vehicles or pedestrians; 

4) will be provided with appropriate facilities - adequate and appropriate to ensure the 
proper operation of the proposed use, structure or condition; and 

5) will be in harmony with the general purposes of this By-Law, 

h) The Board's decisions on Special Permits for Exception shall be subject to notice and record 
as provided in paragraphs VIII 4 B c above. 

3. Variances. The Board may authorize a variance from the strict terms of this By-Law in accord- 
ance with the procedures and requirements of Chapter 40A G.L. A variance may be granted only when 
the Board finds and files a written record that all of the conditions specified in Chapter 40A G.L. 
Section 15-2 and in the following paraphrase and illustrative sentences apply to the particular 
lot, use or structure for which the variance is sought: 

a. The existence of special circumstances applying to the lot or structure for which the 
variance is sought (such as the exceptional narrowness, shallowness, or shape of the lot in 
question, or exceptional topographical conditions which are peculiar to such lot or structure) 
but not affecting generally the zoning district in which it is located; and 

b. the literal enforcement of the provisions of the By-law would involve substantial hardship, 
financial or otherwise to the appellant, not shared by owners of other premises in the same 
district; and 

c. the specific variance as granted is the minimum variance that will grant reasonable relief 
to the owner and is necessary for a reasonable use of the lot or structure; and 

105 




ARTICLE 22. (conC.) 

d. the granting of the variance will be in harmony with the general purposes and intent of 
this By-law, and with the convenience, welfare, safety, health, and character of the district 
within which it is proposed, and 

e. granting the variance will not be injurious or otherwise detrimental to the public welfare. 
In authorizing a variance, the Board shall attach such conditions and safeguards as it deems 

necessary to protect the neighborhood and the community, such as, but not limited to those speci- 
fied in paragraph VIII-4-C-6 above for Special Permits. 

4. The Board of Appeals shall also hear and decide appeals concerning; 

a. TempKjrary use, building, or structure, as specified in Section VI-2 herein. 

b. Change or extention of a non-conforming use or alteration or enlargement of a non-conforming 
building or structure, as specified in Sections VI-IB and VI-IC herein. 

c. Dumping and filling, as specified in Section VII-2 herein. 

d. The use of heavy punch presses or drop hammers, as specified in Section III-4 A Item 8 
herein. 

e. Projection above the maximum height regulations, as specified in Section V-2 herein. 
VII I -5. AMENDMENTS 

This By-law or any portions thereof may be amended, modified, or repealed as provided by law. 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Robert F. Leahy: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-law by striking out in its 
entirety Section VIII - Enforcement, Appeal, Amendment and inserting in its place the following: 

The Moderator asked Mr. Leahy if his motion followed the Article in the Warrant exactly and Mr. Leahy asked 
permission to have the meeting correct their copy as he read them out. This was done and the changes are 
incorporated below. 

SECTION VIII - Administration, Enforcement and Amendment 

VIII-I. The Building Inspector shall administer, execute and enforce the provisions of this By-Law, except 
where otherwise provided, through interpretation and application of the provisions thereof. In so 
doing he shall have the same powers as are provided to execute and enforce the Building Laws of the 
Town. He shall approve no application, plan, or permit, or the specifications thereof, except in 
conformity with this by-law. 

VIII-2. Permits 

A. Permits Required: 

It shall be unlawful for any owner or person to erect, construct, reconstruct, convert or alter 
a structure or change the use, increase the intensity of use, or extend or displace the use of 
any building, other structure or lot without applying for and receiving from the Building 
Inspector the required permit therefor. 

B. Permit Applications: 

For purposes of administration, special permit for exception and application procedure involving 
a structure may be made at the same time and combined with the permit required under the Building 
Laws. 

Any application for a special permit for exception shall be accompanied by plans and specifica- 
tions in duplicate, showing the actual shape and dimensions of the lot to be built upon, the 
exact location and size of all buildings or structures already on the lot, together with the 
lines within which all buildings or structures are to be erected, the existing and intended 
use or uses of each building, structure or area within the lot. 

Where the application does not involve a structure but only a lot, a special permit for ex- 
ception shall be applied for and may be issued. In addition to plot plans and drawings required 
for submission under regulations of the Building Code, plans and information also for off-street 
parking, landscaping, loading, sewerage and fi IHng shall be f i led as may be necessary, under 
provisions for Site Plans in Section IV-3 E and F, as hereinbefore specified, or otherwise to 
provide for the execution and enforcement of this by-law. 

Applications for a Special Permit for Exception which may be authorized by the Board of Appeals 
for uses under Sections III-IB, III-2B, III-3B, III-4B, III-5B and Section V-2 or elsewhere In 



106 



nCLE 22. (cone.) 

this By-law as "on appeal by the Board of Appeals" shall be made to the Building Inspector on an 
appropriate form secured from the Building Inspector, the Town Engineer or the Town Clerk and 
filed with the Town Clerk. 

C. Occupancy Permits 

No premises, and no building erected, altered, or in any way changed as to construction or use, 
under a permit or otherwise, shall be occupied or used without an occupancy permit signed by the 
Building Inspector, which permit shall not be issued until the premises, building, or structure, 
and its uses and accessory uses comply in all respects with this by-law. 

D. Permit Records 

A record of all such applications, plans, and permits shall be kept on file by the Building 
Inspector. 

II-3. Violations and Penalties 

A. Violations 

The Building Inspector shall serve a notice of VIOLATION AND ORDER to any owner responsible for 
the erection, construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, conversion, maintenance, or use 
of any building or other structure, or use of any lot in violation of the provisions of this 
By-law, or in violation of any approved plan, drawing, information, or drawing pertinent thereto; 
or in violation of a permit or certificate issued under the provisions of this By-law; and such 
order shall direct the discontinuance of the unlawful action, use or condition, and the abatement 
of the violation within a time to be specified by him. Any owner, who having been served with 
a notice and who ceases any work or other activity, shall not leave any structure or lot in such 
conditions as to be a hazard or menace to the public safety, health, morals, or general welfare. 
The Building Inspector shall have the power to require that such premises be put in such condi- 
tion as he directs. 

B. Violation Penalty 

Whoever shall violate or cause to be violated any provision of this by-law shall be subject to 
a fine not to exceed fifty (50) dollars for each day of the continuance of such violation. 

1-4. Board of Appeals 

A. Established: 

The Board of Appeals heretofore established under the zoning by-law previously in effect shall 
continue as the Board of Appeals under this by-law and under Division 1, Section 7 of the Building 
Laws of the town. The members and associate members thereof shall continue in office for the 
duration of their appointed terms. 

B. General Powers and Duties: 
The Board as hereinbefore specified shall have the same powers and duties as are provided in the 
Building Laws of the town and all the powers and duties under the applicable provisions of the 
General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and of this by-law as specified herein. 

1. Rules. The Board shall adopt rules, not inconsistent with the provisions of this zoning 
by-law, for conducting its business and otherwise carrying out the purpose of Chapter 40A G.L., 
and shall file a copy of such rules In the office of the town clerk. 

2. Meetings of the Board shall be held at the call of the chairman, and also when called In 
such other manner as the board shall determine In Its rules. All Hearings shall be open to 
the Public. 



3. Notice of decisions shall be given as required In Section 18 of Chapter 40A - G.L. to 
parties In Interest, the landowner. Planning Board, etc. and filed with the Town Clerk. "No 
variance or permit shall take effect until such notice Is recorded In the Middlesex County 
Registry of Deeds." 

4. Records. "The Board shall cause to be made a detailed record of Its proceedings showing 
the vote of each member upon each question, or. If absent or falling to vote. Indicating such 
fact, and setting forth clearly the reason or reasons for its decisions, and of Its other 
official actions, copies of all of which shall be Immediately filed in the office of the ... 
town clerk and shall be a public record." Chap. 40A - G.L. 



107 




ARTICLE 22. (cont.) 

The Board shall, with Che advice and assistance of the Building Inspector, maintain and keep 
up-to-date a map indicating by means of appropriate symbols, colors, or other notations, the 
locations in which it has taken approving or disapproving action. 

C. Particular Powers 

The Board of Appeals shall have powers to: 

1. Hear and decide appeals taken from any order, decision, or determination, made by the Buildinl 
Inspector in the execution and enforcement of this by-law. 

2. Grant Special Permits for Exception to an applicant, "in appropriate cases and subject to 
appropriate conditions and safeguards, ... to make use of his land or to erect and maintain 
buildings or other structures thereon in accordance with such an exception." Chap. 40A G. L. 
Special Permits may be authorized by the Board for uses under Sections III-IB, III-2B, III-3B, 
III-4B, III-5B and Section V-2 or elsewhere in this By-law as "on appeal by the Board of 
Appeals" under the following procedure: 

a) Application to the Building Inspector on the appropriate form and filed with the 
Town Clerk. 

b) Reference of the application to the Town Planning Board for a report thereon. Said 
report shall set forth, insofar as practicable, the probable effect of or need for such 
use, within the general area thereof, or within the town, and may contain suggestions or 
recommendations relating to the establishment of any such use. The report shall be sub- 
mitted to the Board of Appeals within forty-five (45) days after receipt by the Planning 
Board of the notice of the filing of any request under the sections affected. If such 
submission is not made within the period required, a rep>ort favorable to the establish- 
ment of the use shall nevertheless be deemed to have been made. 

c) Public Hearing, notice of which shall be given in accordance with the provisions of 
Section XVII of Chapter 40A G.L. and of this By-law. 

d) The decision of the Board shall be made within sixty days after the date of the filing 
of an appeal, application or petition (Chap. 40A G.L.) 

e) In acting up>on an application for a Special Permit, the Board shall take into considera- 
tion whether 

1) Che specific site is an appropriate location for the use or structure; I 

2) the use develop)ed will adversely affect the neighborhood; J 

3) there will be undue nuisance or serious hazard to vehicles or pedestrians, and i 
adequate and appropriate facilicies will be provided Co ensure Che proper operacion 

of Che proposed use, scrucCure, or condicion; 

4) Che proposed use or sCrucCure will be in harmony wich Che general purpose of Chis 
By-law; 

5) Che recommendaCi ons of Che Planning Board. 

f) The Board may impose addicional condicions on any Special PermiC Co limic, arrange, 

and adjusc uses and sCrucCures as ic finds reasonably appropriaCe Co safeguard Che neighbor- 
hood or oCherwise serve Che purposes of Chis By-law, including buC noC limiCed Co, Che 
following: fronC, side, or rear yards greaCer Chan Che minimum required by Chis By-law, 
screening, buffers or planning sCri p, fences, or walls, as specified by Che Board; modifica- 
tion of Che exCerior appearance of Che sCrucCure; limicacion ujjon Che size, number of occu- 
pancs, meChod and cime of operacion, or excenc of facilicies; regulacion of number and 
locacion of drives, accessways, or ocher Craffic feaCures; and off-sCreeC parking or load- 
ing, or oCher special feaCures beyond Che minimum required in Chis By-law. 

g) The Board shall granC a Special Permic only when ic finds in a wriCCen reporC filed 
wich Che Town Clerk ChaC Che proposed use or sCrucCure - 

1) will be in conformance wich all che limicacions and condicions for such use 
prescribed in Che liscing of uses in SecCion III of Chis by-law; 

2) will noC adversely effecC Che neighborhood; 

3) will noC creaCe a nuisance or serious hazard Co vehicles or piedescri ans ; 

4) will be provided wich appropriaCe facilicies - adequaCe and appropriaCe Co 
ensure Che proper operacion of Che proposed use, sCrucCure or condicion; and 

5) will be in harmony wich Che general purposes of Chis By-Law. 

h) The Board's decisions on Sf)ecial Permics for ExcepCion shall be subjecC Co noCice and 
record as provided in paragraphs VIII-4-B 3 above. 

3. Variances. The Board may auchorize a variance from Che sCricC Cerms of Chis By-Law in accorc 
ance wich Che procedures and requiremenCs of ChapCer 40A G.L. A variance may be granCed only 
when Che Board finds and files a wriCCen record ChaC all of Che condicions specified in ChapCer ^ 
G.L., SecCion 15-2 and in Che following paraphrase and illusCraCive senCences apply Co the 



108 



:TICLE 22. (cont.) 

particular lot, use or structure for which the variance is sought: 

a. The existence of special circumstances applying to the lot or structure for which the 
variance is sought (such as the exceptional narrowness, shallowness, or shape of the lot 
in question, or exceptional topographical conditions which are peculiar to such lot or 
structure) but not affecting generally the zoning district in which it is located; and 

b. the literal enforcement of the provisions of the By-law would involve substantial 
hardship, financial or otherwise to the appellant, not shared by owners of other premises 
in the same district; and 

c. the specific variance as granted is the minimum variance that will grant reasonable 
relief to the owner and is necessary for a reasonable use of the lot or structure; and 

d. the granting of the variance will be in harmony with the general purposes and intent 
of this By-law, and with the convenience, welfare, safety, health, and character of the 
district within which it is proposed, and 

e. granting the variance will not be injurious or otherwise detrimental to the public 
welfare . 

In authorizing a variance, the Board shall attach such conditions and safeguards as it 
deems necessary to protect the neighborhood and the community, such as, but not limited 
to those specified in paragraph VIII-4-2C above for Special Permits. 
4. The Board of Appeals shall also hear and decide appeals concerning: 

a. Temporary use, building, or structure, as specified in Section VI-2 herein. 

b. Change or extention of a non-conforming use or alteration or enlargement of a non- 
conforming building or structure, as specified in Sections VI-IB and VI-IC herein. 

c. Dumping and filling, as specified in Section VII-2 herein. 

d. The use of heavy punch presses or drop hammers, as specified in Section III-4 A Item 8 
herein. 

e. Projection above the maximum height regulations, as specified in Section V-2 herein. 
II-5 AMENDMENTS 

This By-law or any portions thereof may be amended, modified, or repealed as provided by law. 

e Finance Committee recommended approval. The Planning Board filed a report. Vote taken by standing 
s - 169 No - 4 Motion carries. 

tion for reconsideration of the above motion was lost. 

riCLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by deleting Section VIII, 2 B.i. (be 
tide 15 as voted at the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting on March 20, 197 1), namely: 

In exercising the authority conferred by this section the Board shall consider not only the 
particular restrictions contained in Sections III-lB, III-2B, III-3B and III-4B, but also 
proposed placement of buildings, major topographic changes, provisions for waste disposal, 
surface and ground water drainage, parking areas and driveways. After said consideration 
the Board may authorize the specified use provided it determines the public convenience 
and welfare will be substantially served and the requested use will not tend to impair the 
status of the neighborhood. The Board may impose appropriate conditions and safeguards 
upon the granting of the specified use; but shall not apply to Section III-1-B5 and by 
j substituting therefore by adding the following to Section VIII-2-B.i., namely: 

In exercising the authority conferred by this section the Board shall consider not only the 
particular restrictions contained in Sections III-IB, III-2B, III-3B and III-4B, but also 
propxjsed placement of buildings, major topographic changes, provisions for waste disposal, 
surface and ground water drainage, parking areas and driveways. After said consideration 
the Board may authorize the specified use provided it determines the public convenience 
and welfare will be substantially served and the requested use will not tend to impair the 
status of the neighborhood. The Board may impose appropriate conditions or safeguards upon 
the granting of the specified use; or do anything in relation thereto. 

1 ion by Mr. James Banda: "I move that we pass over Article 23 and take no action. Voted unanimously. 



109 



ARTICLE 24. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available fum 
and appropriate for surveys and engineering studies of additional Sanitary Land Fill sites, and authorize 
Selectmen to use any part of said sum to acquire the necessary temporary easements, by purchase, or by 
seizure by right of eminent domain, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $30,000 l|r 
surveys and engineering studies of additional Sanitary Land Fill sites, and authorize the Selectmen to use 
any part of said sum to acquire the necessary temporary easements, by purchase, or by seizure, by right ol 
eminent domain." Finance Committee approved $30,000.00. Vote taken by voice and declared unanimous by ti 
Moderator. 

ARTICLE 25. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available fund 
and appropriate for the Council for the Aging, Chapter 40, Section 8B, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James Banda: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $50C)0 
for the Council for the Againg, Chapter 40, Section 83," Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 
Voice vote taken and Moderator declared motion failed. Mr. Banda doubted the vote. Standing vote taken: 
Yes - 47 No - 102 Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to rescind Article 29 of the Annual Town Meeting held March II, 
1967 which authorized the Selectmen to sell and convey by release deed in the name and on behalf of the Toll 
to Thomas J. Martin the following described parcel of land belonging to the Town and located on Silver Lak 
Avenue and being shown on Assessors Map 55, Parcel 214 to which reference is made for a more particular de 
cription, or however otherwise said parcel may be bounded, measured or described, and further to authorize 
the Selectmen to sell for an amount not less than $550.00 and to fix other terms of the sale, or do anythi 
in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Carl A, Backman, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to rescind Article 29 of the Annual Town 
Meeting held March 11, 1967." Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion voted unanimously. .| 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Conservation Commission to purchase, take by 
eminent domain or receive as a gift, all or any part of a certain parcel of land described in Certificate 
Title No. 10427 recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds and shown on plan entitled "Pla 
Land in Wilmington, Parker Holbrook, Engineer," a copy of which plan is filed with Certificate of Title No 
1031 at said Deeds and being shown as Lot "A" and together with appurtenant rights and subject to provisio 
both described in said Certificate of title No. 10427, but excepting parcels conveyed of record described 
Lots 190 and 191 shown on Subdivision plan filed with Certificate No. 10428; and to see if the Town will v 
to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquiring said parcel and determine how said ap 
priation shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, o 
act in any other manner in relation thereto. Request of Conservation Commission. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur W. Bureau: "I move that the Town authorize the Conservation Commission to purchase or 
receive as a gift a certain parcel of land described in Certificate of Tital #10427 recorded in the Middle < 
North Registry of Deeds and being shown as Lot 192 on "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., February 18, 197 
Dana F. Perkins and Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers and Surveyors", being a subdivision of Lot "A" as shown on 
L.C.C. 6294A, to which plan reference is made for a more particular description or however otherwise said 
parcel may be bounded, measured or described, and together with appurtenant rights and subject to provisio:; 
and for the purpose of acquiring said land, I move that the sum of $20,200.00 appropriated at the 1971 Anmjl 
Town Meeting relative to Article #8 be transferred to fund this acquisition." Finance Committee approved 
$20,200. VOTED unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 28. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available fund 
and appropriate for the purpose of acquiring the following described parcels of land for recreational purp 
and authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift for said purposes, th' 
certain parcels of land with the buildings thereon bounded and described as follows: 

PARCEL 1. 

Southwesterly by Union Street, by a curved line, about one hundred eight and 84/100 (108.84) feet; 
Northwesterly by Lot 108, about eighty-four (84) feet; Northerly and Northeasterly by Silver Lake, about 
eighty (80) feet; and Southeasterly by lands now or formerly of Silver Lake Athletic Assn. of Eleanor & 
Charles J. Wiggin ai\d Albert & Jennie E. Smith, two hundred five and 21/100 (205.21) feet. All of said 
boundaries, except the water line, are determined by the Land Court to be located as shown on subdivision 



110 



TICLE 28. (cont.) 

an 8860 B, Sheet Two (2), drawn by C. H. Gannett, C. E., dated Nov. 1924, as approved by the Court, filed 
the Land Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of Title 2893, and 
id land is shown as Lot one hundred nine (109) on said plan. 
RCEL 2. 

Southerly by Grove Avenue, about 180 feet; Easterly by land now or formerly of Samuel Neat, about 60 
et; and Northerly by land now or formerly of the Union Ice Company, by two courses measuring about 107 feet 
d about 73 feet respectively; all as shown on plans on file in the office of the Town Clerk. 

any and all of said measurements more or less, or do anything in relation thereto. 

cion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 
$19,200 for the purpose of acquiring the following described parcels of land for recreational purposes, 
d authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift for said purposes, the 
rtain parcels of land with the buildings thereon bounded and described as follows: 
RCEL I. 

Southwesterly by Union Street, by a curved line, about one hundred eight and 84/100 (108.84) feet; 
rthwesterly by Lot 108, about eighty-four (84) feet; Northerly and Northeasterly by Silver Lake about 
ghty (80) feet; and Southeasterly by lands now or formerly of Silver Lake Athletic Assn. of Eleanor & 
arles J. Wiggin and Albert & Jennie E. Smith, two hundred five and 21/100 (205.21) feet. All of said 
jndaries, except the water line, are determined by the Land Court to be located as shown on subdivision 
an 8860B, Sheet Two (2), drawn by C. H. Gannett, C. E., dated Nov. 1924, as approved by the Court, filed in 
5 Land Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of Title 2893, and said 
tid is shown as Lot one hundred nine (109) on said plan. 
RCEL 2. 

Southerly by Grove Avenue, about 180 feet; Easterly by land now or formerly of Samuel Neat, about 60 
2t; and Northerly by land now or formerly of the Union Ice Company, by two courses measuring about 107 feet 
J about 73 feet respectively; all as shown on plans on file in the office of the Town Clerk. Be any and 
1 of said measurements more or less." Finance Committee approved $19,200. VOTED unanimously by voice and 
declared by the Moderator. 

:ion by Mr. Frank Ottati that the meeting take Article #30 out of order. So VOTED. 

nCLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by inserting the following in their 
jper sequence; or do anything else in relation thereto. 



[-6 



Uses in a Flood Plain District 
A. In a Flood Plain District, the following uses are hereby permitted: 

1. Any use permitted in the District which the Flood Plain District overlays, under the condi- 
tions and procedures as provided for such District, subject to the following provisions. 

a. No building, wall, dam or other structure shall be erected, constructed, altered, 
enlarged or otherwise created or moved within the Flood Plain District. 

b. No dumping, filling, excavating or transferring of any material within said District 
shall reduce high-water storage capacity or otherwise significantly affect the drainage 
or natural flow pattern in the water course except as required for flood control or 
water supply. 

c. No sewage disposal system or other potential source of substantial pollution or 
building for human occupancy is permitted within the Flood Plain District. 

d. Any and all sewage disposal systems, storage areas, or tanks for chemicals or pet- 
roleum products or other potential sources of substantial pollution shall be set 

back from the boundaries of the Flood Plain District by at least 50 feet. 



B. In a Flood Plain District, the following uses are permitted as authorized on appeal by 
the Board of Appeals, and as specified in Section VIII-2 B hereinafter. 

1. Open land uses, with accessory buildings and structures, subject to the following 
provisions . 

a. Any such building or structure permitted by the Board of Appeals shall be designed, 
placed and constructed to offer a minimum obstruction to the flow of water and shall 
be firmly anchored to prevent floating away. 

2. Driveway or road, where alternative means of access are impractical, subject to the 
following provisions. 



Ill 



ARTICLE 30. (cont.) 



a. Provided that after reference to and report by the Town Engineer, the Board of Appeals 
shall find that there will be adequate drainage and that such driveway or road will not in- 
terfere adversely with the natural flow of water in the area or with the general purposes 
for which Flood Plain Districts are established. 

C. If any land shown on the Zoning Map as being in the Flood Plain District is found by the Board 
of Appeals, after reference of the proof to and report by the Board of Health and Planning Board, 
as being in fact not subject to flooding or not unsuitable because of drainage conditions for per- 
mitted development, and that the use of such land for such development, will not interfere with 
the general purposes for which Flood Plain Districts have been established, and will not be 
detrimental to the public health, safety or welfare, the Board of Appeals may permit the use of 
such land for any permitted use under all the provisions of this by-law applying to the under- 
lying District in which the land is located. 

D. If for any reason the restrictions or requirements contained in this Section shall be or become 
invalid or inoperative as to any land shown on the Zoning Map as being in the Flood Plain District, 
then such land shall continue to be zoned in the District which the Flood Plain Districts overlays. 

SECTION 1-2 ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION OF DISTRICTS 

A. 8. Flood Plain Districts (W) 

D.6. The boundaries of Flood Plain Districts are the property lines, dimension lines or the contou 
lines for the elevation above mean sea-level (Boston Base) indicated by the figures therein, or at 
least 50 feet on both sides from the center line of the stream. All areas within the outlines of 
any Flood Plain District shown on the Zoning Map which are within 50 feet of the center line of the 
stream, or are at or below the contour level indicated by the figure therein are subject to the 
regulations relating to the Flood Plain District. 

1-3 LOTS IN MORE THAN ONE DISTRICT , 

; and provided further that all parts of any lot extending into the Flood Plain District shall be 
counted in figuring the "minimum lot area for use" as required in Section V-1 Schedule of Requireme 

SECTION II DEFINITIONS 

14. FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT. Those areas of land adjacent to the streams and other water courses in 
the Town which experience flooding. The purpose of this District is to protect the health and 
safety of persons and prof)erty against the hazards of seasonal or periodic flood water inundation; 
to preserve and protect the streams and other water courses in the Town and their adjoining lands 
from pollution; to preserve and maintain the ground water table for water supply purposes; to 
protect the community against the detrimental use and development of lands in areas subject to 
flooding or adjoining such water courses; and to maintain the watershed areas of the Town for the 
health, safety and welfare of the public. 

15. OPEN LAND USE. Any open space development which will not interfere with the general purposes 
for which Flood Plain Districts have been established. Request of the Conservation Commission. 

Motion by Mr. Francis Ottati. The motion follows the warrant article #30 exactly except for the few additi( 
and deletions as were read to the Town Meeting before the vote was taken, as follows: 

III-6 Uses in a Flood Plain District 

A. In a Flood Plain District, the following uses are hereby permitted: 

1. Any use permitted in the District which the Flood Plain District overlays, under the conditioi 
and procedures as provided for such District, subject to the following provisions. 

a. No building, wall, dam or other structure shall be erected, constructed, altered, 
enlarged or otherwise created or moved within the Flood Plain District except as permitted 
by the Board of Appeals, as provided for in Section III-6B and III-6C. 

b. No dumping, filling, excavating or transferring of any material within said District 
shall reduce high-water storage capacity or otherwise significantly affect the drainage 
or natural flow pattern in the water course except as required for flood control or water 
supply. 

112 



ICLE 30. (cont.) 

c. No sewage disposal system or other potential source of substantial pollution or 
building for human occupancy is permitted within the Flood Plain District. 

d. Any and all sewage disposal systems, storage areas, or tanks for chemicals or 
petroleum products or other potential sources of substantial pollution shall be set 
back from the boundaries of the Flood Plain District by at least 50 feet. 

B. In a Flood Plain District, the following uses are permitted as authorized on appeal by the 
Board of Appeals, and as specified in Section VIII-2 B hereinafter. 

1. Open land uses, with accessory buildings and structures, subject to the following provisions, 
a. any such building or structure permitted by the Board of Appeals shall be designed, 
placed and constructed to offer a minimum obstruction co the flow of water and shall be 
firmly anchored to prevent floating away. 

2. Driveway or road, where alternative means of access are impractical, subject to the following 
provi sions . 

a. Provided that after reference to and report by the Town Engineer, the Board of Appeals 
shall find that there will be adequate drainage and that such driveway or road will not 
interfere adversely with the natural flow of water in the area or with the general pur- 
poses for which Flood Plain Districts are established. 

C. If any land shown on the Zoning Map as being in the Flood Plain District is found by the Board 
of Appeals, after reference of the proof to and report by the Board of Health and Planning Board, 
as being in fact not subject to flooding or not unsuitable because of drainage conditions for per- 
mitted development, and that the use of such land for such development, will not interfere with 
the general purposes for which Flood Plain Districts have been established, and will not be detri- 
mental to the public health, safety or welfare, the Board of Appeals may permit the use of such 
land for any permitted use under all the provisions of this by-law applying to the under-lying 
District in which the land is located. 



D. If for any reason the restrictions or requirements contained in this Section shall be or become 
invalid or inoperative as to any land shown on the Zoning Map as being in the Flood Plain District 
then such land shall continue to be zoned in the District which the Flood Plain Districts overlays. 



HON 1-2 ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION OF DISTRICTS 



A. 8. Flood Plain Districts (W) 



D,6. The boundaries of Flood Plain Districts are the property lines, dimension lines or the contour 
lines for the elevation above mean sea-level (Boston Base) indicated by the figures on the Flood Plain 
District Zoning Map. 



LOTS IN MORE THAN ONE DISTRICT 



; and provided further that all parts of any lot extending into the Flood Plain District shall be 
counted in figuring the "minimum lot area for use" as required in Section V-1 Schedule of Require- 
ments . 



•ION II DEFINITIONS 



14. FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT. Those areas of land adjacent to the streams and other water courses in 
the Town which are deemed subject to seasonal or periodic flooding. The purpose of this District is 
to protect the health and safety of persons and property against the hazards of seasonal or periodic 
flood water inundation: to preserve and protect the streams and other water courses in the Town and 
their adjoining lands from pollution; to preserve and maintain the ground water table for water supply 

I purposes; to protect the community against the detrimental use and development of lands in areas sub- 
ject to flooding or adjoining such water courses; and to maintain the watershed areas of the Town for 
the health, safety and welfare of the public. 

15. OPEN LAND USE. Any open space development which will not interfere with the general purposes 
for which Flood Plain Districts have been established. 

ince Committee approved. Planning Board reported. Standing vote: Yes - 183 No - 3 Motion carries. 
.Otatti had slides of wet-lands which he showed and was complimented upon his presentation. 



113 



J 



or 



ARTICLE 29. To see if Che Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington to include th« 
Flood Plain Districts as shown on the Plan filed in the office of the Town Clerk, or do anything else in 
relation thereto. Request of the Conservation Commission. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur W. Bureau: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmin; 
to include the Flood Plain Districts as shown on the plan filed in the office of the Town Clerk." 
Standing vote: Yes - 146 No - 3 Motion so VOTED. 

Finance Committee approved this motion. The Planning Board filed a report. 
Motion to reconsider Article 30 failed. 
Motion to reconsider Article 29 failed. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by deleting in its entirety Section 
VII-1 entitled "Excavation" and substituting therefor, the following: 

VII- 1. EARTH REMOVAL 

Earth removal shall be permitted only in accordance with the Earth Removal By-Law regardless of t\ 
zoning district; 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James Banda: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by deleting in its entiny 
Section VII-1 entitled "Excavation" and substituting therefor, the following: 

VII-1 EARTH REMOVAL 

Earth removal shall be permitted only in accordance with the Earth Removal By-Law regardless of tl 
zoning district." 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Planning Board filed a report. Vote taken by standing: 
Yes - 96 No - 45 Motion carried. Motion to reconsider this vote was lost. 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 21 of Chapter 59 of the General Laws (Chapter 
of the Acts of 1971) or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Banda to pass over this article and take no action thereon. So VOTED. 



89 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wlmington by 
voting to rezone from Rural (R) District to Single Residence A District, the following described parcel o 
land, to wit: that certain parcel of land consisting of land owned by Jean-Cor, Inc., and also land owned 
others located off Aldrich Road, and consisting of twenty-nine and one-half (29.5) acres more or less, be 
bounded and described as follows: beginning at the southwesterly comer of said parcel at the intersect 
the present Single Residence A Zoning District boundary line and the easterly side of a private way now o 
formerly designated as Washington Avenue; thence westerly by said now or formerly designated Washington 
Avenue a distance of four hundred and fifty five (455) feet, more or less; thence northerly by land of 
Jean-Cor, Inc., a distance of eight hundred and twenty two (822) feet, more or less; thence northerly by 
land of Jean-Cor, Inc., a distance of six hundred and fifty-five (655) feet, more or less, to the present 
Single Residence A Zoning District boundary line; thence southerly by said Single Residence A Zoning Dist 
boundary line, a distance of two hundred and eighty-seven (287) feet, more or less; thence easterly in tw 
courses by said present Single Residence A Zoning District boundary line, a distance of one thousand four 
hundred and thirty (1430) feet, more or less; thence southerly in five courses by said Single Residence A 
Zoning District boundary line, a distance of sixteen hundred and four (1604) feet, more or less. The for 
going description being shown on a copy of a plan prepared by Robert D. Morris, Registered Land Surveyor, 
which copy of said plan is filed with the office of the Town Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. 



Motion by Mr. Joseph F. Courtney: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the To 
of Wilmington by voting to rezone from Rural (R) District to Single Residence A (SRA) District, the folio 
ing parcel of land, to wit: - That certain parcel of land consisting of land owned by Jean-Cor Construct 
Corp., and also land owned by others located off Aldrich Road In said Wilmington, and consisting of twent 
and one-half (29.5) acres more or less, being bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the southwe 
corner of said parcel at the point of Intersection of the present Single Residence A (SRA) Zoning Dlstrlc 
boundary line and the easterly side of a private way now or formerly designated as Washington Avenue; The 
running in a northerly direction along said easterly side of the private way now or formerly designated a 
Washington Avenue a distance of four hundred and fifty-five (455) feet more or less; Thence turning and 



114 



TICLE 33. (cont.) 

nning In an easterly direction along land of Jean-Cor Construction Corp. a distance of eight hundred and 
enty-two (822) feet more or less; Thence turning and running in a northerly direction along land of 
an-Cor Construction Corp., a distance of seven hundred and twenty (720) feet more or less; Thence turning 
d running in an easterly direction a distance of eight hundred and fifty-eight (858) feet more or less 

the present Single Residence a' (SRA) Zoning District boundary line; thence turning and running In a south- 
sterly direction A distance of two hundred and eighty seven (287) feet more or less along said present 
ngle Residence A (SRA) Zoning District boundary line; Thence turning and running in a southerly direction 

two courses a distance of fourteen hundred and thirty (1430) feet more or less along said present Single 
sldence A (SRA) Zoning District boundary line; Thence turning and running in a westerly direction in five 
urses a distance of sixteen hundred and four (1604) feet more or less along said present Single Residence 
(SRA) Zoning District boundary line to the point of beginning; the foregoing description as shown on a plan 
spared by Robert D. Morris, Registered Land Surveyor, a copy of which plan is filed in the office of the 
m Clerk." 

nance Committee recommended approval. The Planning Board filed a report. Vote taken by standing: 
5 - 132 No - 18 Motion carries. 

tlon to reconsider Article 33 failed. Still under Article 33. Mr. Courtney presented to the Moderator 
leed to a portion of this land shown on the map filed with the Town Clerk and a Declaration of Restrictive 
tenants, Mr. Callan in turn presented them to the Town Clerk for the purpose of safe keeping for the Town. 

riCLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map by rezoning the follow- 
5 described parcel of land from Single Residence "A" to Industrial: 

:ertain parcel of land with the buildings thereon shown on a plan entitled "Rezoning Plan, Wilmington, Mass." 
:ed December 29, 1971, K. J. Miller Company, Inc., Civil Engineers' Land Surveyors, and bounded and des- 
ibed as follows: Northeasterly by West Street, two hundred eleven and 69/100 (211.69) feet; Southeasterly 
the town line of Reading and Wilmington, eight hundred seventy-seven and 27/100 (877.27) feet; Southwesterly 
Interstate Route 93, as shown on said plan, in two courses measuring respectively, one hundred twelve and 
'100 (112.88) feet, and one hundred thirty-two and 23/100 (132.23) feet; and Northwesterly by land of 
jper, as shown on said plan, six hundred sixty-six and 21/100 (666.21) feet; containing 154,425 square feet 
land according to said plan, or do anything in relation thereto. 

:ion by Mr. Hupper: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and Zoning Map by rezoning the 
lowing described parcel of land from Single Residence "A" to Industrial: 

ertain parcel of land with the buildings thereon shown on a plan entitled "Rezoning Plan, Wilmington, 
s." dated December 29, 1971, K.J.Miller Company, Inc., Civil Engineers/Land Surveyors, and bounded and 
cribed as follows: Northeasterly by West Street, two hundred eleven and 69/100 (211.69) feet; South- 
terly by the town line of Reading and Wilmington, eight hundred seventy-seven and 27/100 (877.27) feet; 
thwesterly by Interstate Route 93, as shown on said plan, in two courses measuring respectively, one 
dred twelve and 88/100 (112.88) feet, and one hundred thirty-two and 23/100 (132.23) feet; and North- 
•terly by land of Hupper, as shown on said plan, six hundred sixty-six and 21/100 (666.21) feet; contain- 
I 154,425 square feet of land according to said plan." 

ance Committee recommended approval. The Planning Board filed a report. Motion was voted unanimously 
I declared so by the Moderator. 

IICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell to Carl E. Nelson a 
itain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 66 on Assessors' Map 40, containing about 2,500 square 
c, or do anything in relation thereto. 

don by Mr. Banda: "I move to pass over this article and take no action on it." So VOTED. 

cion to adjourn came at 7:30 p.m. there being no further business before the meeting. So voted, 
iwrned at 7:30 p.m. 

b"e were 378 voters checked in at this meeting. 



115 



Grand Totals voted at this meeting, as follows! 



BY TAXATION 
BY TRANSFER 



$8,158,832.17 
$8,631,096.92 



! I 



Attest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - April 25, 1972 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in Wilmington High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, 
the twenty-fifth day of April 1972 at 10:00 o'clock a.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
following offices: 

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

20 Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the Democratic Party 
12 Alternate Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the Democratic Party 
10 Delegates at Large to the National Convention of the Republican Party 
10 Alternate Delegates at Large to the National Convention to the Republican Party 
7 District Delegates to the National Convention of the Democratic Party 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

4 Alternate District Delegates to the National Convention of the Democratic Party 

2 District Delegates to the National Convention of the Republican Party 

2 Alternate District Delegates to the National Convention of the Republican Party 

SEVENTH SENATORIAL DISTRICT 

2 District Members of State Committee (one man and one woman) for Democratic Party 
2 District Members of State Committee (one man and one woman) for Republican Party 

TOWN COMMITTEE 

35 Members of Democratic Town Committee 
35 Members of Republican Town Committee 

The Polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said meet 
Given under our hands this tenth day of April A.D., 1972. 



s/George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 
s/James F. Banda 
s/Carl A. Backman, Jr. 
s/A. Daniel Gillis 
s/Michael A. Caira 



Selectmen of 
the Town of 
Wi Imington 



il 
ti 



CONSTABLES RETURN 

Middlesex, ss. Wilmington, Massachusetts April 11, 1972 

I this day posted five true and attested copies of the within Primary Election Notice at the following loca ^ 
tions: Town Hall, Police Station, Fire Station, Public Library and U.S. Post Office. 

s/A. John Imbimbo, Constable of Wilmington 

116 



krl 



RESIDENTIAL PRIMARY (cont.) 



April 25, 1972 



; 9:45 a.m. the Warden, Mr. Stanley Webber read the Warrant. The three ballot boxes were opened in the 
esence of the warden, two ballot box clerks, the Clerk of the Election, the police officer in charge and 
le Town Clerk. All agreed the box registers read 00000 and were empty. All election officers were sworn to 
le faithful performance of their duties. 

le Warden signed the receipt for the ballots. There were nine boxes said to contain 4122 Democratic ballots 
id 2905 Republican ballots for a total of 7027. The receipt for these ballots was forthwith given to the 
wn Clerk by the Police Officer on duty. The ballot clerks then took charge of the ballots. 

.e Polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. and were closed at 8:00 a.m. 



ere were (14) absentee ballots cast. 

ere were (1585) Democratic ballots cast. 

ere were (294) Republican ballots cast. 

tal number of ballots cast in this election (1879). 



X spoiled ballots were returned. Total unused ballots (5142). There were (30) teams of Tellers and (3) 
ams of total tally workers. 

e to the cumbersome Democratic ballot it took all of this help to finish the counting and tallying until 

00 a.m. the next morning. 

1 of the ballots were sorted, counted, recorded and declaration thereof made as by law is directed, and 
re for the following, namely: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



esidential Preference 

Shirley Chisholm 57 

Edward T. Coll 

Vance Hartke 

Hubert H. Humphrey 174 

fienry M. Jackson 22 

John V. Lindsay 3 

iugene McCarthy 13 

3eorge McGovern 794 

rfilbur D. Mills 38 

Cdmund S. Muskie 319 

Jeorge C. Wallace 137 

Jam Yorty 1 

Ted Kennedy 4 

)thers 9 

ilanks 14^ 

1585 

l egates at Large 

Group #1 

Robert F. Drinan 734 

lary I. Bunting 646 

ack H. Backman 644 

lien M. Jackson 609 

. Kenneth Galbraith 665 

oberta F. Benjamin 619 

ohn L. Saltonstall, Jr. 709 

uth M. Batson 618 

Ivin Levin 613 

ary E. Williamson 619 

harles F. McDevitt 645 

ary A. Markel 602 

esse Parks 606 

oris M. Kanin 603 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY (cont.) 



Delegates at Large (cont.) 

Salvador E. Luria 626 

Margaret V. Eagan 640 

F. Christopher Arterton 601 

Patricia A. Simon 607 

Elizabeth A. Chase 629 

Antonia H. Chayes 618 

Group #2 

Kevin H. White 439 

Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. 341 

Robert H. Quinn 358 

Doris Kearns 303 

Lena Saunders 296 

Robert Q. Crane 341 

David M. Hartley 326 

Kevin B. Harrington 345 

Mary L. Fonseca 311 

Geraldine Pleshaw 299 
Salvatore Camelio (deceased - all votes 

considered blanks) 

Ronald Glover 296 

Samuel H. Beer 303 

Betty Taymor 298 

Ann L. Dunphy 300 

Melvin B. Miller 298 

K. Dun Gifford 304 

Nicholas Mavroules 302 

Irene Lambert 312 

Anna P. Buckley 328 



117 




I 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY (cont.) 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY (cont.) 

Delegates at Large (cont») 
Not Grouped 
George G. Burke 
Endlcott Peabody 
Blanks 



Alternate Delegates 
Group #1 
Alexander Rodriguez 
Kenneth J. Moynlhan 
Karl H. Haag 
Constance Kantar 
Carl K. King 
Anne P. Priest 
Stephen J. Morgan 
Monteal M, Yerby 
Francis E. Moore 
Sandra L. Ahlburn 
Kathleen K. Houton 
Michael J. Brower 

Group #2 
John F. X. Davoren 
Archibald Cox 
Elizabeth Parnes 
Frank J. Manning 
Alfred Olerlo 
Barbara J. Garvey 
Jack E. Robinson 
James E. Smith 
Susan Haar 
Peter Edelman 
James F. Mu Honey 
Margaret M. Breen 
Blanks 



District Delegates - 5th District 
Group #1 
Joseph F. Sweeney 
Gall Dunfey 
John F. Cogan, Jr. 
Joan S. Bug 11 one 
John A. Callahan 
Rochelle G. Caney 
Robert B. Kennedy 

Group #2 
John Joseph Buckley 
Carole A. Schultz 
Cornelius F. Klernan 
B. Joseph Tully 
William C. Geary, Jr. 
James F. Llnnehan 
Kevin C. Sullivan 



56 

99 

12792 
31700 



620 
627 
600 
596 
619 
604 
618 
593 
613 
599 
602 
608 



362 
298 
301 
298 
300 
293 
298 
295 
297 
291 
301 
301 
8086 
19020 



221 
215 
211 
190 
206 
188 
230 



229 
179 
191 
196 
181 
181 
228 



April 25, 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY (cont.) 

District Delegates - Fifth District (cont.) 
Group #3 
Patricia G. Bensetler 
Veronica C. Dooley 
Nathaniel B. Guild 
Ann J. Guzowski 
Klaus Kubierschky 
Judith A. Pickett 
Paul D. Vergakes 

Group yA4 
Charles N. Tsapatsaris 
Caroline B. Rees 
Jane A. Trudeau 
Albert D. Kowalak 
S. Mark Tuller 
James D. Pitts, 3rd 
Jean E. Rubensteln 



Not Grouped 
Glenn M. Cooper 
Others 
Blanks 

Alternate Delegates 
Group #1 
William M. Goldsmith 
Martha J. Monazynski 
David A. Tibbetts 
Sylvia L. Conroy 

Group #2 
Anna M. Vlscontl 
Helen GHbrlde Droney 
Mark E. Goldman 
Paul J. Sheehy 

Group #3 
Anne Marie Goggin 
Paul T. White 
Gerald J. Urban 
Michelle R. Lamar che 

Group #4 
Eleanor Abbott 
Beverly W. Jarnagln 
Dennis M. Prebensen 
Edward J. Romano, Jr. 
Blanks 

State Conunittee - 7th Middlesex District 
(Man) 

John F. Cogan, Jr. 

Edward M. App 

Thomas P. Lyons 

Blanks 



118 



ISIDENTIAL PRIMARY (cont.) 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY (cont.) 

,te Committee - 7th Middlesex District 

(Woman) 

laire Buckley Dwyer 
lancy F. Earsy 
ithers 
lanks 



959 
191 
1 

434 
1583 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Presidential Preference 
John M. Ashbrook 
Paul N. McCloskey, Jr. 
Richard M. Nixon 
Others 
Blanks 



April 25, 1972 



12 
40 
222 
5 
15 



294 



n Committee 

nna M. Visconti 

lice M. Chisholm 

imothy J. Kane 

'eter Enos 

Imon Cutter 

,eo F. Harrington 

ames L. McLaughlin 

lary L. Cunningham 

orothy H. Lane 

alph D. Peterson 

liver A. Aruda 

lice C. Sadler 

ames F. Banda 

red F. Cain 

leanor F. O'Keeffe 

lary E. Lanni 

homas W. Coates 

eorge W. Boylen, Jr. 

nastasia Maclnnis 

adeline B. Higglnbotham 

anlel E. O'Keeffe 

llliam J. Fay, Jr. 

ohn W. McCann 

mest M. Crispo 

ohn Brooks 

alter J. McNaroara 

lizabeth Kelley 

erald A. Fagan 

If red E. Lynch 

arbara A. Peterson 

aynard C. Eaton 

lorence E. Borofsky 

elia K. Enos 

nthony Visconti 

nlly Landry 

}semarie Gatta 

jrry Landers 

:hers 

Lanks 



1003 
897 
865 
884 
919 
883 
849 
860 
807 
818 
833 
794 
1023 
995 
855 
835 
816 
929 
813 
851 
827 
932 
817 
918 
873 
895 
857 
934 
867 
824 
827 
811 
857 
933 
51 
21 
2 
21 
25675 
55475 



Delegates at Large 
Francis W. Sargent 
Elizabeth E. Amesbury 
Lloyd B. Waring 
Margaret M. Donohue 
Ann C. Gannett 
Robert C. Hahn 
Elliot L. Richardson 
Leverett Saltonstall 
John A. Volpe 
Jaye A. Whittier 
Blanks 



Alternate Delegates 

William F. Arrigal, Jr. 
Muriel Erna Ballantine 
Ann R. Blackham 
Ronald Burton 
Hastings Keith 
Paula E. Logan 
Josephine C. Marcotte 
F. Bradford Morse 
Martha Reardon 
Emily R. Terlizzi 
Blanks 



District Delegates - 5th District 
Paul W. Cronin 
Lydia Lee Howard 
Blanks 



Alternate Delegates 
Lawrence Brave rman 
Deborah Williams 
Blanks 



State Committee - 7th Middlesex District 
(Man) 



Phillip A. 
Blanks 



Adams 



State Committee - 7th Middlesex District 
(Woman) 

Marion E. Hunt 

Helen June Ekstrom 

Blanks 



249 
194 

202 
191 
188 
191 
228 
245 
240 
199 
813 
2940 



177 
179 
193 
186 
193 
181 
180 
234 
180 
182 
1055 
2940 



239 
205 
144 
588 



208 
204 
176 
588 



209 
85 
294 



156 
59 
79 

294 



119 





PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY (cont.) 



April 25, 12 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Town Committee 



REPUBLICAN PARTY (cont.) 
Town Committee (cont.) 



Ruth M. Kitchener 


209 


Angus B. MacFeeley 


Madelon C. Slater 


lo7 


Asta R. Ready 


James R. Mi cell 


225 


William D. Ready 


Phyllis T. Ritchie 


188 


Carol Anne Frost 


Pauline E. McCue 


184 


Constance J. Phillips 


Wavie M. Drew 


218 


Jane Ann Hoi brook 


Milton L. Bradford, Jr. 


190 


John J. Waugh 


Roland L. Vfood 


212 


Jeanne M. Waugh 


Carl L. Noelcke, Jr. 


190 


George G. Lingenfelter, Jr. 


M. Flora Kasabuski 


188 


Herbert W. Higley 


Ralph 0, Lux 


180 


Philip T. Andrews 


Bruce A, Dewire 


182 


Richard W. Thackeray 


Ralph W. Peterson, Jr. 


187 


John P. Gushing 


Donald R. Garland 


189 


Sandra P. Durli'ng 


Louis A. Dindo 


189 


Mildred R. LanziUo 


Lulu E. Sanborn 


182 


William G. Hooper, Jr. 


Leota A. Sanborn 


178 


Others 


James S. Fairweather 


186 


Blanks 


Patricia MacFeeley 


185 





_2_ 

10 



After the declaration of the vote the meeting adjourned at 8:00 a.m. the following morning. 



Attest ; 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



STATE PRIMARY - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - September 19, 1972 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth, you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Gymnasium, Church Street on 
Tuesday, the nineteenth day of September 1972 at ten o'clock a.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for t 
following offices: 



Senator in Congress 
Representative in Congress 
Counci 1 lor 
Senator 

Representative in General Court, Middlesex 
Register of Probate and Insolvency 
Two County Commissioners 
County Treasurer 



For this Commonwealth 

For this Fifth Congregational District 
For this Sixth Councillor District 
For this Seventh Senatorial District 
For this 25th Representative District 
For Middlesex County 
For Middlesex County 
For Middlesex County 



The Polls will be open from ten (10) o'clock a.m. to eight (8) o'clock p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeti ng . 



Given under our hands this twenty-eighth day of August A.D. 1972 



George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 

James F. Banda 

Carl A. Backman, Jr. 



Michael A. Caira ) 
A. Daniel Gillis ) 
) 



Selectmen of "the Town of 
Wi Imington 



120 



ATE PRIMARY 



September 19, 1972 



lis was Che first election in the Town of Wilmington in which voting machines were used. Classes were held 
iveral times to teach election workers how to open and close the machines and to teach the voters how to 
le the machines. The League of Women Voters were especially helpful in teaching the public before and 
iring this election how to vote on these machines. Since my election officers were new at this business of 
•eparing for a voting machine election I hired them to come in at 8:00 p.m. to give them plenty of time to 
ike care of the preliminaries prior to opening the polls. 

1 Che election officers were sworn to the faithful performance of Cheir ducies and assigned Cheir work 
tmediaCely. Everyone cook pare in opening Che machines and getcing Che "zero" sheeC ouC of the machines 
I that the candidates could look at them before the fwlls were opened. We had no problems, everything 
irked like a charm due to the excellent cooperation of everyone involved. 

le Warden, Mr. Webber, read Che Warrant at 9:45 a.m. The seals were cut and Che y/2 key Curned up on each 
ichine at 9:55 a.m. and were ready for voting. The polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. 

; 3:30 p.m. Che absenCee ballots were checked against the voting list and put through the small ballot box. 



lere were twenty-five absentee ballots cast. 



ital Democratic votes - 1834. Total Republican votes - 403. Total votes cast - 2237. 

16 polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. Immediately the #2 key was turned down and a new seal inserted in the 
iters entrance button on each machine. This locks the machine against further voting. The "printer pack" 
lich prints each candidates vote was removed from the back of the machines. One copy went to the Total 
illy Team and one copy of each print was p)osted outside the railing so that candidates could take their own 
'Cal at once. 



10:00 p.m. we were reading the totals of the 25 machines Co Che public. 

e majoriCy of Che voters using these machines this day were delighted with how easy they were Co use. 

1 of the totals from the 25 machines plus the 25 absentee ballots were recorded and declaration Chereof 
de, as by law is direcCed, and were for Che following, namely: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



nator in Congress 
John J. Drone y 
John Pierce Lynch 
herald F. O'Leary 
Blanks 



909 
221 
445 

259 
1834 



Senacor in Congress 
Edward W. Brooke 
Blanks 



348 

55 
403 



[ igressman - 5ch DisCricC 



Uenn M. Cooper 62 

Fohn J. Desmond 96 

^Chony R. DiFruscia 154 

lelen Gilbride Droney 44 

■'rederick J. Finnegan 42 

tobert B. Kennedy 203 

ohn F. Kerry 871 

laniel P. Kiley, Jr. 36 

'aul J. Sheehy 241 

.1 chard Williams 43 

lanks 42 



1834 



Congressman - 5th District 



Paul W. Cronin 268 

George P. Macheras 15 

Armand Morissette 27 

Ellen A. Sampson 66 

Blanks 27 



403 



121 




4 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Councillor - 6th District 
G. Edward Bradley 
Lawrence J. Carr 
Dennis Gregory Jakimczyk 
Thomas Robbat 
Blanks 



298 
1088 
44 
48 
356 
1834 



Councillor - 6th District 
No candidate 



Senator - 7th Middlesex District 
Frank J. Hassett 
William H. Shaughnessy 
Blanks 



618 
724 
492 
1834 



Senator - 7th Middlesex District 
Ronald C. MacKenzie 
Blanks 



Representative in General Court 

25th Middlesex District 

Fred F. Cain 

Leo F. Harrington 

Blanks 



1160 
564 
110 

1834 



Representative in General Court 
25th Middlesex District 



James R. 
Blanks 



Mi cell 



312 
91 
403 



Register of Probate and Insolvency 

Middlesex County 

John V. Harvey 
Joseph M. Barry 
Francis J. Harrington 
Blanks 



649 
303 
477 
405 
1834 



Register of Probate and Insolvency 

Middlesex County 

No candidate 



County Commissioners - Middlesex County 

Frederick J. Connors 434 

John F. Dever, Jr. 787 

Anthony Accardi 92 

James F. Adams 81 

Pasquale R. Coppola 129 

Francis R. King, Jr. 211 

Kenneth Manning 97 

S. Lester Ralph 429 

Joseph P. Trainor, Jr. 65 

Paul E. Tsongas 418 

George Tsoukalas 149 

Blanks 776 

3668 



County Commissioners - Middlesex County 
Sherry H. Jenkins 
Ed Mattar 

William R. Morrison 
Blanks 



209 
110 
227 
260 
806 



County Treasurer - Middlesex County 
Thomas B. Brennan 
Chester W. Cooper 
Paul G. Counihan 
Frank J. Mirabelli 
Blanks 



756 
216 
347 
163 
352 
1834 



County Treasurer - Middlesex County 
William A. Barnstead 
Blanks 



330 
73 
403 



After the declaration of the vote the meeting adjourned at 10:00 p.m. 



Attest ; 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



122 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - October 30, 1972 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



: Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

EETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
id Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
fairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium Monday, the Thirtieth of October, A. D., 1972 at 
30 o'clock in the evening to consider and act upon the following articles: 

e Moderator, Mr. John Callan called the meeting to order at 7:35 p.m. there being a quorum present. 

. Callan began the reading of the Warrant as shown above when Mr. George Boylen, rose to move that we dis- 
nse with further reading of the Warrant and take up each article by number. Motion so voted. 

TICLE I. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 8A of Chapter 40 of the General 
ws as established by Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1954 and as most recently amended, and to establish a 
velopment and industrial commission consisting of not less than five or more than fifteen members with all 

the powers and duties thereof as provided in said Section 8A of Chapter 40 General Laws, or do anything 

relation thereto. 

Cion by Mr. Carl A. Backnan, Jr.; "I move that the Town vote to establish a development and industrial 
ranission consisting of not less than five nor more than fifteen members to be appointed by the Town Manager." 
nance Committee now approves. Vote taken by voice and Moderator declared the Ayes have it. Seven (7) voters 
se to doubt the vote. Vote taken by standing: Yes - 333 No - 243 Motion carried. 

nCLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying a 
ter main in Oakwood Road, Reading Avenue, Maple Road and Davis Road for certain distances as shown on a 
an on file with the Superintendent of the Water Department, of not less than six inches but less than 
Kteen inches in diameter, in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Water and Sewer 
rani ssioners acting under the provisions of General Laws (Ter. Ed.), Chapter 40, Section 42G to 421 inclu- 
de, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available 
ids, by borrowing or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

:lon by Arnold C. Blake: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $15,261.00 for the purjxjse of 
ang water mains in Oakwood Road, Reading Avenue, Maple Road and Davis Road for certain distances as shown 

a plan on file with the Superintendent of the Water Department, of not less than six inches but less than 
cteen inches in diameter in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners 
:lng under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 42G to 421 inclusive and that said appropria- 
)n be raised by transfer from Account #1164, entitled the Salem Street Wellfield Account, originally appro- 

ated and raised by borrowing in Article 64 of the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting of March 8, 1969." Finance 
anittee approved. Vote on motion taken by voice and was declared unanimous by the Moderator. 

'ICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the inhabitants of the Town of 
mington by deleting Chapter 3, Section 15, and substituting as follows: 

Chapter 3, Section 15 

The Selectmen may accept from time to time in behalf of the Town the right of easement for the 
purposes of storm drains, pedestrian walkways, streets, and retaining walls, provided such right 
of easement is made by a good and sufficient instrument executed by the donor in proper form to 
be recorded in the Registry of Deeds. 

'do anything in relation thereto. 

te: This adds pedestrian walkways, streets, and retaining walls after the words "storm drains".) 

lion by A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the inhabitants of the 
''n of Wilmington Chapter 3 by deleting Section 15, and substituting as follows: 

Chapter 3. Section 15 

I The Selectmen may accept from time to time in behalf of the Town the right of easement for the 
purposes of storm drains, pedestrian walkways, streets, and retaining walls, provided such right 

123 




ARTICLE 3. (cont.) 

of easement is made by a good and sufficient instrument executed by the donor in proper form to 
be recorded in the Registry of Deeds." 



The Finance Committee approved. Vote on motion taken by voice and was declared unanimous by the Moderate . 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of unde: a 
ing a comprehensive study and analysis of the technical and financial feasibility of establishing a town 
owned and operated municipal electrical utility and department by the employment of a qualified consultai 
and other expenses, and to determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation by transr 
from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$13,000 for the purpose of undertaking a comprehensive study and analysis of the technical and financial 
feasibility of establishing a town-owned and operated municipal electrical utility and department and th( 
Selectmen be and hereby are authorized to employ qualified consultants and other expenses, and to meet s. d 
appropriation that the sum of $6,000.00 be transferred from Account No. 200/A4, Police Department, Salar; 
Patrolmen, and the sum of $7,000.00 be transferred from Account No. 970, Distribution Surplus Foods." 
Finance Committee approved. 

After some discussion the Moderator allowed a professional consultant to answer questions from the voter; 
More discussion followed. A voice vote was taken and the Moderator declared the vote to be unanimous. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate said funds for 
Highway Department, Snow and Ice Account, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Michael A. Caira: "I move that the Town vote to transfer and appropriate the sum of $15,000.00 - 
Account No. 200/A7, Police Department, Salary Vacations, to the Highway Department, Snow and Ice Account 
Finance Committee approved. 

Vote taken by voice and the moderator declared the ayes have it. Vote was unanimous. 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to take by eminent domain proceeding 
easements from time to time, giving the Town the right to construct and maintain drains, pedestrian walki 
and retaining walls, and to raise and appropriate a sufficient sum of money to carry out the purpose of ii 
article, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager: "I move that the Town vote to pass over Article 6 and take m 
action." Vote on motion by voice and declared carried, by the Moderator. 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of prov 
cooperative or complementary facilities to out-patient clinics established or to be established in accorc 
with the provisions of Chapter 19, in cooperation with the Department of Mental Health and other agencies 
collaborating with said Department, and for providing payment for services rendered or to be rendered by a 
public or private agencies, said funds so appropriated to be expended under the direction of the Board o: 
Health, pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 5, and to determine how the appropriation shall be raised 
whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or do anything in relaii 
thereto . 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 . 
the purpose of providing coojjerative or complementary facilities to out-patient clinics established or t( 
be established in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 19, in cooperation with the Department of Mei 
Health and other agencies collaborating with said Department, and for providing payment for services ren( 
or to be rendered by such public or private agencies, said funds so appropriated to be expended under th< 
direction of the Board of Health, pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 40, Section 5, and to meet said appropriatic 
that the sum of $1,000 be transferred from Account No. 924, Local Transportation, and the sum of $1,000 1 
transferred from Account No. 915, Sewer Maintenance." 

Finance Committee approved. Voice vote taken and it was declared unanimous by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 8. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available fui 
by borrowing or otherwise or appropriate for the Police Department Sick Leave account or do anything in i 
lation thereto. 

124 



ITICLE 8. (cont.) 

tlon by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Tovm vote to transfer and appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 from 
count No. 945, Unpaid Bills, and the sum of $1,500.00 from Account No. 300/A2, Town Engineer, Salary 
hers, to the Police Department Sick Leave Account." Finance Committee approved. 

tion voted by voice and the Moderator declared the Ayes have it. Voted. 

TICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
g the following described parcels of land for school purposes and determine how said appropriation shall be 
ised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to see 
Che Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or receive as a gift 
r said purposes certain parcels of land described as follows: 

Parcel #1, consisting of 73.842 acres located on the North Side of Salem Street in North 
Wilmington, beginning at a point on the West Side of Boston & Maine Land the North side 
of Salem Street thence: 

By Salem Street 63.28 ft. in a curved line to a point thence turning N7 20 55E 295.71 ft. to a 

point thence turning 
N49 34 06W 461.99 ft. to a point thence turning 
N73 10 07W 261.29 ft. to a point thence turning 
S86 06 35W 310.95 ft. to a point thence turning 
N78 43 42W 218.00 ft. to a point thence turning 
SII 16 18W 60.00 ft. to a point thence turning 

580 18 58W 75.83 ft. to a point thence turning 

S 4 13 53E 159.26 ft. to a point on Salem Street thence turning 

581 01 18W by Sal em Street 118.26 ft. to a point thence turning 
N70 40 40W by Salem Street 73.81 ft. to a point thence turning 
N34 38 lOE 231.71 ft. to a point thence turning 

N55 21 50NW 183.43 ft. to a point thence turning 
N26 22 48E 365.50 ft. to a point thence turning 
N 3 15 51W 1562.13 ft. to a point thence turning 

N88 35 27E 1636.25 ft. to land of B & M R.R. to a point thence turning 

Southerly by B & M land in a curved line 324.97 ft. to a point thence turning 

S 06 45E 200.00 ft. to a point thence turning 

by a curved line 195.70 ft. ,o a point thence turning 

S 7 20 55W 2011.85 ft. to the point of beginning 

said parcel being more fully shown on plan dated August 7, 1972 by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. 
Sheets 1 and 2. 

Parcel #2, consisting of 17.701 acres located in North Wilmington, bounded as follows: 
Beginning at a point on the North side of Butterworth Street and the East side of Lipp Street 
thence 

N6 58E 200 ft. to a point thence turning 

N2 14 40W 1064.03 ft. to land of Kunigenas thence turning 
N88 35 27E 574 ft. by land of Kunigenas to a point thence turning 
S3 15 51E 1356.18 ft. by land of Lanois to a point thence turning 
N82 58 14W 638.46 ft. by Butterworth Street to the point of beginning 

said parcel being a portion of land shown on plan recorded in the Middlesex North Registry of 

Deeds, Plan Book #33, Page #3, more fully shown on plan dated August 7, 1972, by K. J. Miller Co., Inc. 

do anything in relation thereto. 

Ion by Arthur R. Smith, Jr.: I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $75,000.00 for 
. purpose of acquiring the following described parcels of land for the construction of a public school or 

lools thereon, and authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or receive as a gift for 

d purposes certain parcels of land described as follows: (Here the Moderator asked Mr. Smith if the 
'crlption of the land followed exactly that as laid out in Article #9 of this Warrant. Mr. Smith 

wered "Yes." Mr. Callan said we would dispense with reading the description of this land.) 

11 under the motion . . . and the appropriation of $75,000.00 be met by the transfer of $13,200.00 from 
■ount No. 1105 - Purchase Land School Sites, and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be 
hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums in the amount of $61,800.00 and to issue bonds or notes 



125 



i 




I 
I 
I 



he 



ARTICLE 9. (cont.) 

therefor as authorized by Chapter 44 of the General Laws." Finance Committee approved $75,000 Bond Issue 
Mr. Arthur Smith then offered an amendment to Article #9 as follows: 

That Article #9 in the Warrant for the Special Town Meeting, October 30, 1972 be amended by striking out 
first six lines in the description and substituting the following: 

PARCEL # 1, Consisting of 73.154 acres of land located on the North side of Salem Street in 
North Wilmington beginning at a point on the West side of Boston & Maine land 500 feet 
distant Northeasterly N 7° 20' 55" E from Salem Street thence 

WESTERLY: N 82° 32' 04W 273.34 feet to a point, thence turning 

SOUTHWESTERLY: S 24° 32' 54" W 300 feet to a point on Salem Street, thence turning North 
49° 34' 06" W, 62.38 feet, thence turning 

NORTHEASTERLY: N 24° 32* 54" E, 208.89 feet to a point, thence turning 

NORTHWESTERLY: N 65° 27* 06" W, 125 feet to a point 180 feet distant northeasterly from Salem Street 
thence turning 

NORTHEASTERLY: N 23° 59' 33" E by a stone wall 86.80 feet to a point, thence turning. . . . 

The School Committee showed slides on this site and the amendment change. A great deal of discussion 
followed by School Committee members, other voters and then Mr. Laughton of the Finance Committee left hi 
position on the Finance Committee to take the floor to talk against a new High School at this site and ac 
to the present High School without taking any homes. The Moderator said he had exceeded his speaking tii. 
Mr. Callan asked the meeting if they would be willing to give Mr. Laughton five minutes imore to wind up \ 
thoughts on this matter. It would require a two-thirds vote. Vote taken - Yes - 326 No - 264 Motion 1 
for lack of two-thirds vote. More discussion followed. 



Vote on the amendment was taken by voice and it so carried. More discussion, 
amended. Yes - 421 No - 225 Motion fails for lack of two-thirds vote. 



Vote on the main motion as 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acq^ 
ing the following described parcel of land for the construction of a public school or schools thereon, ar 
determine how said appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
borrowing or otherwise, and further to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, 
by eminent domain, or receive as a gift for said purposes a certain parcel of land located on Wi Idwood St 
shown on "Compiled Plan of Land of Proposed Land Taking in Wilmington, Mass., June 11, 1971, K. J. Millei 
Company, Inc., Civil Engineers & Land Surveyors", being bounded and described as follows: 

Northwesterly by land now or formerly of the First Baptist Church of Wilmington, Inc., 

three hundred eighty-seven (387) feet, more or less; 
Northeasterly by land now or formerly of the Town of Wilmington, three hundred thirty 

(330 feet, more or less; 

Northwesterly still by land now or formerly of the Town of Wilmington, three hundred (300) feet, 
more or less; 

Northeasterly and Easterly by Wi Idwood Street, as shown on said plan, a distance of one thousand 
four hundred ninety-one and 93/100 (1,491.93) feet, more or less; 

Southeasterly, Southerly and Southwesterly by land now or formerly of Albert C. Brun by several 
distances measuring respectively, one hundred sixty-two (162) feet, one hundred sixty-seven 
and 25/100 (167.25) feet, thirty-three (33) feet, three hundred (300) feet, ninety-three and 
35/100 (93.35) feet, sixteen and 75/100 (16.75) feet, and one hundred thirteen and 50/100 
(113.50) feet; 

Northwesterly by land of the Town of Wilmington, sixty-nine (69) feet; 

Southerly still by land now or formerly of the Town of Wilmington, one hundred ninety-seven and 
75/100 (197.75) feet; 

Northwesterly still by land now or formerly of the Town of Wilmington, one hundred forty-two and 
(142.06) feet, ninety-five and 52/100 (95.52) feet and two hundred eighty and 92/100 (280.92) 
feet; 



126 



ICLE 10. (cont.) 

Southwesterly still by land now or formerly of the Town of Wilmington, one hundred twenty-six and 
44/100 (126.44) feet, seventy -six and 62/100 (76.62) feet, thirteen (13) feet and one hundred 
forty-eight and 03/100 (148.03) feet, more or less; 

Southeasterly still by land now or formerly of the Town of Wilmington, two hundred nineteen and 
28/100 (219.28) feet; 

Southwesterly still by land now or formerly of the Town of Wilmington, one hundred thirty-three 
(133) feet, more or less; said parcel of land contains according to said plan 17.5 acres of 
land more or less 

do anything in relation thereto. 

ion by Arthur R. Smith, Jr.: ''I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $171,000.00 
the purpose of acquiring the following described parcel of land for the construction of a public school 
schools thereon, and authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or receive as a gift for 
1 purposes a certain parcel of land located on Wildwood Street shown on "Compiled Plan of Land of Proposed 
1 Taking in Wilmington, Mass., June 11, 1971, K. J. Miller Co., Inc., Civil Engineers and Land Surveyors", 
ig bounded and described as follows: 

re the Moderator asked Mr. Smith if the description of the land followed exactly that as laid out in 
icle #10 of this Warrant. Mr. Smith answered "Yes." Mr. Callan said we would dispense with the reading 
:he description of this land.) Mr. Smith continued with his motion. . ."and the appropriation of 
1,000.00 be met by the transfer of $13,200.00 from Account #1105 - Purchase Land School Sites, and 
c the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums 
Che amount of $157,800.00 and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44 of the General 
s. Finance Committee disapproved. 

reat deal of discussion followed - then came a motion to move the previous question. Yes - 412 No - 
; was unanimous. Vote on the main motion None for - 327 opp>osed and so declared by the Moderator. 
I on loses. 

jr Article 10 was disposed with the time was 12:25 a.m. Mr. Boylen moved to adjourn this meeting to 
jmber 2, 1972 (Thursday night) at 7:30 p.m. at the High School Gymnasium at which time he would ask for 
)nsideration of articles #9 and #10. Motion so voted. Meeting adjourned. 

re were one thousand sixty-two (1062) voters checked in at this meeting. 

Town Clerk posted five (5) copies of the Legal Notice of this adjourned meeting in conspicuous public 
:es and had it printed in two issues of the Lowell Sun and once in the Town Crier, notice is as follows: 

LEGAL NOTICE 

Special Town Meeting held on October 30, 1972 will be continued on Thursday, November 2, 1972 at 7:30 p.m. 
he High School Gymnasium, Church Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts. 

se be further notified that the Town Meeting was warned that Articles #9 and #10 will be reconsidered at 
adjourned meeting. 

St: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

ADJOURNED SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - November 2, 1972 

'jse of the expected large attendance at this meeting it was held in the High School Gymnasium and in the 
Is Cafeteria of this school with a second Moderator, Charles F. Mather and connecting microphones as well 
<tra Tellers and Police. At 7:50 p.m. there being a quorum present, Mr. Callan called the meeting to 
<r. Mr. Callan asked Mr. Mather if the 'mikes' were working well and if everything was in readiness In 
:room. The answer was 'yes'. 

•George Boylen, Jr. moved the reconsideration of Article 9 at this time. This motion was put to a voice 
it and the motion carried in both rooms and so declared by the Moderator. 



127 



ARTICLE 9. (Reconsideration) Mr. Arthur Smith, Jr. read Article #9 pointing out that Parcels #1 and #:jar 
the same as read on October 30th. Finance Committee approved. Amendment under Article 9 (reconsiderati 
Mr. George Boylen, Jr. read the same amendment exactly as it was offered to the Meeting on October 30, 1 
A great deal of discussion followed. It was pointed out that this amendment changes the entremce to thell 
to a safer place. 



Mr. James Banda said that the Selectmen, Town Manager, Engineer and Mr. CorvuB flew over this land this o 
ing in a helicopter and they were in agreement that this site is the best there is for a High School, 
discussion - then came a motion to move the previous question. Yes - 751 No - 11 Motion passes to cutjof 
debate . 

Vote on main motion as amended: Yes - 676 No - 166 Motion carries in both meeting rooms. 

ARTICLE 10. Motion to reconsider Article 10 at this time was lost by a voice vote in both halls. 

Still under Article 10 Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr. moved that the Town vote to pass over Article 10 and tc 
no action. Voted to take no action In both halls. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for preparing prelimiir 
plans and cost estimates for the construction of a new high school at a site to be acquired by the Town i 
determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 
borrowing or otherwise and to authorize and instruct the Permanent Building Committee to enter into con' 
and do all things that are necessary or incidental for preparing preliminary plans and cost estimates, < 
instruct the Permanent Building Committee to report the results to an annual or special Town Meeting as 
as is practical, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mrs. L. Barbara Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $48,00C 
for preparing preliminary plans and cost estimates for the construction of a new high school at Salem St 
and to meet said appropriation that the sum of $48,000.00 be transferred as follows: 
$20,000.00 from Account No. 960, 1972 Salary Adjustments and Costs 
5,000.00 from Account No. 300/Al, Town Engineer, Salary 
1,000.00 from Account No. 230/B9, Building Inspector Expenses 
8,000.00 from Account No. 165/B9, Planning Board, Miscellaneous Services 
2,300.00 from Account No. 200/A5, Police Department, Salary, Traffic Supervisors 
6,000.00 from Account No. 200/9, Police Department, Salary, Extra Details 
5,700.00 from Account No. 205/A3, Fire Department, Salary Privates 
and to authorize and Instruct the 'Permanent Building Committee to enter into contracts and do all things 
are necessary or incidental for preparing preliminary plans and cost estimates, and to Instruct the Pern 
ent Building Committee to report the results to an annual or special Town Meeting as soon as It is pract 
Finance Committee approved. 

Mrs. Hooper, Mr. Little and Mr. Brooks spoke on the motion. Mr. Scott Kent offered an amendment llmitlj 
the amount to be spent for this motion. Mr. Callan stated that Mr, Kent's amendment was not in proper ote 
and that he was not going to accept It at this time. 

Voters suggested we not consider swimming pools and skating rinks for this school. Mrs. Hooper said the 
School Committee was only asking for a basic building - extra frills would be Included only as an option 
the voters wanted them. 

Amendment offered again by Mr. Scott Kent: "To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sul c 
$48,000.00 for preliminary plans and cost estimates for the construction of a new high school; with a to 
cost not to exceed ten (10) million dollars Including all preliminary architects fees and planning expen 
tures and also including all costs for site preparation, constructing and originally equipping said scho 
for all architects and engineering fees, for planning and installing required septic system or sewer con 
tions, at a site to be acquired and to meet said appropriation, as In the motion read by Mrs. Hooper." 
discussion followed. Motion to move the previous question voted unanimously In both halls. Vote on ame 
went: Yes - 226 No - 487 Motion lost in both halls. 

Mr. Boylen moved the previous question. The Moderator declared the vote to be more than two-thirds Yes 
both halls. The Moderator read the Main motion to the meeting - the vote was as follows: the Ayes have 
in the Gymnasium - the Ayes have it in the Cafeteria - motion carries. Motion to reconsider Article 11 
NO in Gymnasium and NO in the Cafeteria. Motion fails. 



128 



ITICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for preparing preliminary 
ans and cost estimates for the construction of an addition to the High School and determine how the appro- 
iation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise 
id CO authorize and instruct the Permanent Building Committee to enter into contracts and do all things 
lat are necessary or incidental for preparing preliminary plans and cost estimates, and to instruct the 
rmanent Building Committee to report the results to an annual or special Town Meeting as soon as it is 
actical, or do anything in relation thereto. 

tion by Mrs. Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to pass over Article 12 and take no action. Voted unani- 
usly to take no action, in both halls. 

TICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for preparing preliminary 
ans and cost estimates for the construction of a new elementary school at a site to be acquired by the Town 
d determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, 

borrowing or otherwise and to authorize and instruct the Permanent Building Committee to enter into con- 
acts and do all things that are necessary or incidental for preparing preliminary plans and cost estimates, 
d to instruct the Permanent Building Committee to report the results to an annual or special Town Meeting 

soon as it is practical, or do anything in relation thereto. 

tion by Mr. James A. Demos: "I move that the Town vote to pass over Article 13 and take no action. Voted 
take no action in both halls. 

TICLE 14. To See if Che Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for preparing preliminary 
ans and cost estimates for the construction of an addition to the Wi Idwood Street School and determine how 
e appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or 
herwi se and to authorize and instruct the Permanent Building Committee to enter into contracts and do all 
Ings that are necessary or incidental for preparing preliminary plans and cost estimates, and to instruct 
e Permanent Building Committee to report the results to an annual or special Town Meeting as soon as it is 
actical, or do anything in relation thereto. 

tion by Mrs. Nancy H. Clark: I move that the Town vote to pass over Article 14 and take no action." 
Ced to take no action in both halls. 

nCLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Carl E. Nelson a 
rtain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 66 on Assessots' Map 40, containing about 2,500 square feet, 
jject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further Co set Che minimum amount to 
'paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

I 

Irion: (Mr. Daniel Gillis read Mr. Nelson's motion for him.) "I move chac che Town vote to auchorize Che 
ird of Selectmen to sell and convey to Carl E. Nelson for a sum of not less than $100.00, a certain parcel 
I Town-owned land being shown as Parcel 66 on Assessors' Map 40, subject Co such Cerms and condicions as the 
lectmen may determine, being bounded and described as follows: 

Situated on the easterly side of Parker Street, being shown as Lot 48 as shown on Plan of Lots 
in Wilmington, MassachuseCCs , recorded in Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, Book of Plans 3A, 
Plan 45, together bounded and described as follows: Northeasterly by Parker Street 25 feet; 
Southeasterly by Lot 49 as shown on said plan, 100 feet; Southwesterly by Lot 57 as shown on 
said plan, 25 feet; Northwesterly by Plymouth Avenus-, 100 feet; together containing 2,500 square 
feet more or less, be all measurements more or less or however ocherwise bounded and described 
on said plan." 

Jance Committee recommended the approval of a minimum of $500.00. Motion made and seconded to take no 

^ion was withdrawn. Vote taken by standing: Yes - 83 No - 165 Motion was lost in both halls. 

■1 

is action took place after Article 21 was acCed upon. Mocion to reconsider Article 15. Ayes have it in 
\i\ halls. Mr. Carl E. Nelson was asked by Che Moderator if he would be willing to add to his motion the 
Itrictions as laid out under Article 16. Mr. Nelson agreed to this. The Moderator read the Mocion under 
icle 15 including in the reading the following restrictions as agreed upon by Mr. Nelson. 

! Tor the benefit of the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall become part of 
' the grantee's contiguous premises and shall only be used for extension of a principal 

building structure currently existing and/or for any lawful accessory use appurtenant thereto. 
Also for the benefit of the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall not be di- 
vided or subdivided either with or wichouc the grantee's contiguous premises. The above 



129 



ARTICLE 15. (cont.) 

restrictions shall run with the land herein described and shall be binding on the grantee, 
his heirs and assigns and successors in title, all in accordance with law." (As in original 
motion for a sum of not less than $100.00.) 

Voted as follows: Yes - 122 No - 16 Motion carries in both halls. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Robert Mulli . 
certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 15 on Assessors' Map 7, containing about 29,500 squar 
feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimi 
amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Robert Mullin: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell an 
vey to Robert Mullin for a sum of not less than five hundred dollars ($500.00) a certain parcel of Town 
land being shown as Parcel 15 on Assessors' Map 7, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectme 
determine, and subject to the following restrictions: 

For the benefit of the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall become part of 
the grantee's contiguous premises and shall only be used for extension of a principal building 
structure currently existing and/or for any lawful accessory use appurtenant thereto. Also for 
the benefit of the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall not be divided or sub- 
divided either with or without the grantee's contiguous premises. The above restrictions shall 
run with the land herein described and shall be binding on the grantee, his heirs and assigns and 
successors in title, all in accordance with law." 

Being bounded and described as follows: Situated on the westerly side of Winston Avenue, 
being shown as Lots part of 978 thru 985 inclusive as shown on the "Wilmington Manor Plan" 
dated September 1909, H. A.Millhouse, C. E., together bounded and described as follows: 
Northerly by Winston Avenue, 200 feet; Westerly by Lot 977 as shown on said Plan, 195 feet. 
Southerly by Wilmington - Burlington Town Line, 230 feet; Easterly by Congress Street, 100 
feet; together containing 29,500 square feet more or less, be all measurements more or less, 
or however otherwise bounded and described on said plan." 



Finance Committee disapproved. Some discussion followed. Vote taken: Yes - 150 No - 88 Motion fail 
both halls. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to John Clark a 
certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel lOlC on Assessors' Map 50, containing about 3,125 squ • 
feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minim 
amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. John C. Clark: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and o 
vey to John Clark for a sum of not less than $500.00 a certain parcel of Town-owned land being shown as 
Parcel lOlC on Assessors' Map 50, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, 
bounded and described as follows: 

The land in Wilmington being Lot 40 on the northeast side of Sheldon Avenue as shown on a Plan 
entitled "Plan of Lots in Wilmington, Mass.," recorded in Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, 
Book of Plans 3A, Plan 45, together bounded and described as follows: Northwesterly by Sheldon 
Avenue, 25 feet; Northeasterly by Lot 39 as shown on said plan, 108.20 feet; Southeasterly by 
Lot 29 as shown on said plan, 25 feet; Southwesterly to point of beginning, 107.18 feet; 
together containing 2,692 feet more or less or however otherwise bounded and described on said 
plan." 

Finance Committee disapproved. Vote taken: Yes - 134 No - 70 Motion fails in both halls. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to James Murra: a 
certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 11 on Assessors' Map 33, containing about 32,700 squ;; 
feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minii n 
amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 



130 



'ICLE 18. (conC.) 

ion by Mr. Stanley Webber,: I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
ivey to James A. Murray for a sum of not less than three thousand six hundred dollars ($3,600.00), a cer- 
n parcel of Town-owned land being shown as Parcel 11 on Assessors' Map 33, subject to such terms and con- 
ions as the Selectmen may determine, being bounded and described as follows: 

Situated on the northerly side of Aldrich Road, being shown as lots numbered 38 to 43 in 
Block "A" as shown on "plan of Lots in Wilmington, Mass." dated June 1928, Dana F. Perkins, 
C. E. recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 52, Plan 45A, 
together bounded and described as follows: Northeasterly by Aldrich Road, 150 feet; North- 
westerly by Lot 44, shown on said plan, 213 feet; Southwesterly by Lots 16, 1, 2 and 3 as 
shown on said plan, 150 feet; Southeasterly by Lot 37 as shown on said plan, 223 feet; 
together containing 32,700 square feet more or less, be all measurements more or less, or 
however otherwise bounded and described on said plan." 

ance Committee disapproved. Vote on motion as follows: Yes - 7 No - 99 in both halls. 

ICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to George Hooper a 
tain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 79 on Assessors' Map 50, containing about 15,000 square 
t, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum 
unt to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ion by Mr. George Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to pass over Article #19 and take no action." Voted 
take no action in both halls unanimously. 

ICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Joseph Mellino a 
tain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 106 on Assessors' Map 55, containing about 12,500 square 
t, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum 
unt to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ion by Mr. William A. Paolini: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
vey to Joseph Mellino for a sum of not less than two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500.00), a 
tain parcel of Town-owned land being shown as Parcel 106 on Assessors' Map 55, subject to such terms and 
ditions as the Selectmen may determine, being bounded and described as follows: 

Situated on the northerly side of Everett Avenue, being shown as Lots numbered 424 thru 
428 inclusive as shown on "Plan of Lots in Wilmington, Mass.", dated 1916, C. E. Carter, 
C. E., together bounded and described as follows: Northwesterly by Everett Avenue, 125 
feet; Northeasterly by Lot 429 as shown on said plan, 100 feet; Southeasterly by Lots 
445, 446, 447, 448 and 449 as shown on said plan, 125 feet. Southwesterly by Lot 423 as 
shown on said plan, 100 feet; together containing 12,500 square feet more or less or 
however otherwise bounded and described on said plan." 

ance Committee disapproved. Vote taken: Yes - 13 No - 135 Motion fails. 

ICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Thomas J. Martin 
ertain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 214 on Assessors' Map 55, containing about 5,800 square 
C, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum 
Jnt to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ion by Mr. Thomas J, Martin: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
fey to Thomas J. Martin for a sum of not less than $250.00 maximum a certain parcel of Town-owned land 
ig shown as Parcel 214 on Assessors' Map 55, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may 
srmine, being bounded and described as follows: 

Being Lot 38 and the northerly part of Lot 37 shown on the Plan of Land by James A. Bancroft, 
C.E., dated August 11, 1887 and recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, 
I Plan Book 4C, Plan 132 and bounded and described as follows: Southeasterly by Silver Lake 
I Avenue, 58.6 feet; Northeasterly by Lot 39, 99.25 feet; Northwesterly by land now or formerly 
of Cole, 58.6 feet; Southwesterly by Southeasterly portion of Lot 37, 99.0 feet; all distances 
being jnore or less, containing about 5,800 square feet or however otherwise said parcel may 
be bounded, measured or described." 



131 



ARTICLE 21. (cont.) 

Finance Committee approved the appraisal of $600.00. The Conservation Committee was in favor of sellin 
this land. Vote taken: Yes - 160 No - Vote was unanimous. 

At this point reconsideration of Mr. Nelson's motion under Article 15 was taken up. See Article #15 
(restrictions added). 

Mr. &oylen called for reconsideration of Article #21. Motion lost. 

Motion to reconsider Article 16. Motion lost. 

Motion to reconsider Article 17. Moderator declared motion by voice caused him some doubt. Standing v 
taken: Yes - 29 No - 92 Motion fails. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town o 
Wilmington 1972, by adding the following section: 

Chapter 3, Section 24 - Air Pollution Control 

It shall be the duty of the Board of Health to develop Rules and Regulations in conformity with 
the State Air Pollution Regulations for the purpose of comparing the level of pollution in Wilmingt(ji 
with standards of air quality as established by the Commonwealth, Department of Public Health, 
Division of Environmental Health and/or Federal air quality control programs and Public Laws, 
or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James J. Durkee: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitan 
the Town of Wilmington, 1972, by adding the following section: 

Chapter 3, Section 24 - Air Pollution Control 

It shall be the duty of the Board of Health to develop Rules and Regulations in conformity with 
the State Air Pollution Regulations for the purpose of comparing the level of pollution in Wilming 
with standards of air quality as established by the Commonwealth, Department of Public Health, 
Division of Environmental Health and/or Federal air quality control programs and Public Law." 

Finance Committee approved. Vote taken by voice and declared unanimously approved, by the Moderator. 

Motion to adjourn came at 11:20 p.m. Meeting adjourned and so declared by the Moderator. 

Number of voters checked in at this meeting nine hundred forty-seven (947). 



Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



STATE ELECTION - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - November 7, 1972 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Law; 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vc 
to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the seventh day of November next at 5:45 
o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be open at 6:00 a.m., and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m., for the el 
tion of the following: Electors of President and Vice President: (1) Representative in Congress; (1) St 
in Congress; (1) Councillor; (1) Senator; (I) Representative in General Court; (1) Register of Probate i 
Insolvency; (2) County Commissioners; (1) County Treasurer and vote YES or NO on ten questions which wi 1 
outlined later on in this record: 

All the election officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties and assigned their worl- 
immediately. Everyone took part in opening the machines and getting the "zero" sheet out of the machine 



132 



iTE ELECTION (cont.) November 7, 1972 

it Che candidates could look at them before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their 
:ing lists and everything was in readiness at 5:45 a.m. at which time the Warden read the Warrant. The 
,1s were declared open at 6:00 a.m. 

! oolls were closed at 8:00 p.m. but because of the long lines a Police Officer was placed at the end of 
,s line at 8:00 p.m. and no other voter could line up behind him for voting. This line of voters took 
:ty-five minutes to vote thus the machines were closed down at 8:55 p.m. the #2 key was turned down and a 
r seal inserted in the voters entrance button on each machine. This locks the machine against further 
:ing. The printer pack which prints each candidate's vote was removed from the back of the machines. One 
)y went to the Total Tally Team at once and one copy of each print was posted outside the railing so that 
I candidate's could take their own total at once. 



I to the heavy vote all day long all workers were kept busy moving the voters along to the machines and 
le of the Absentee work could be done during the day which is our usual practice. Thus this exacting work 
I to be done after nine o'clock. It was 1:45 a.m. when the results of this election were read to the 
)lic. Without voting machines we would have been counting paper ballots when the students returned to 
100 1 the next morning. 

ire were eleven (11) 'partial ballots' - those who were not in town long enough to be true voters and 
lid only vote for the President and Vice President. 

, of the totals from the 25 machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof made, 
by law is directed, and were for the following: 



:CTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT 

Jenness and Pulley, Socialist Workers Party 

McGovern and Shriver, Democratic 

Nixon and Agnew, Republican 

Schmitz and Anderson 

Others 

Blanks 

lATOR IN CONGRESS 



Edward W. Brooke, Republican 

John J. Droney, Democratic 

Donald Gurewitz, Socialist Workers Party 

Blanks 

GRESSMAN - Fifth District 



Paul W. Cronin 
John F. Kerry 
Roger P. Durkin 
Blanks 

NCILLOR - Sixth District 
G. Edward Bradley 
Blanks 

MOR - Seventh Middlesex District 
Ronald C. MacKenzie 
William H. Shaughnessy 

I Blanks 



j ^SENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - Twenty-fifth Middlesex District 
Fred F. Cain 
James R. Mi cell 
Blanks 

[STER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY - Middlesex County 



John V. Harvey 
Blanks 



VOTE 
26 
3530 
3340 
2 
3 

109 
7010 

4122 
2149 
65 
663 
6999 



2803 
3398 
139 
659 
6999 

3025 
3974 
6999 

4021 
1883 
1095 
6999 

3609 
3079 
311 
6999 



3279 
3720 
6999 



133 



STATE ELECTION (cont.) 



November 7, 1 



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS - Middlesex County 



Sherry H. Jenkins 17( 
William R. Morrison 19' 
S. Lester Ralph 32( 
Paul E. Tsongas 31] 
Blanks 38! 

139C 

COUNTY TREASURER - Middlesex County 

Thomas B. Brennan 30f 
William A. Barnstead 21? 
Blanks IT£ 

699 



QUESTION #1 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, 
which was approved by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held June 18, 
1969, received 221 votes in the affirmative and 22 in the negative, and in a joint session of 
the two branches held May 12, 1971, received 238 votes in the affirmative and 14 in the negative? 



Summary 

The proposed amendment would authorize the Legislature to enact a law that agricultural and 
horticultural lands shall be valued, for taxation purposes, according to their agricultural or 
horticultural uses. No parcel of land less than five acres which has not been actively devoted 
to such uses for two years preceding the tax year could be valued at less than fair market value. 



Yes 398 
No 193 
Blanks 107 

699 

QUESTION #2 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, 
which was approved by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held June 18, 
1969, received 143 votes in the affirmative and 113 in the negative, and in a joint session 
of the two branches held May 12, 1971, received 243 votes in the affirmative and 11 in the 
negative? 



Summary 

The proposed amendment would bring the State Constitution into conformity with the 26th Amend- 
ment to the Constitution of the United States by setting the minimum age for voting at eighteen. 



Yes 501 
No 103 
Blanks 95 

699 

QUESTION #3 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, 
which was approved by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held June 18, 
1969, received 258 votes in the affirmative and in the negative, and in a joint session of 
the two branches held May 12, 1971, received 262 votes in the affirmative and 1 in the negative? 



Summary 

The proposed amendment would remove the prohibition against paupers from voting. 



Yes 476 
No 105 
Blanks 118 

699 

QUESTION #4 - Proposed /jnendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, 
which was approved by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held June 18, 
1969, received 264 votes in the affirmative and 1 in the negative, and in a joint session of 
the two branches, held May 12, 1971, received 264 votes in the affirmative? 



134 

i 



VTE ELECTION (cont.) 



November 7, 1972 



Ulnar V 



> proposed amendment would authorize the Legislature to enact a law to permit the Common- 
ilth to make loans for tuition and board at any college, university or institution of higher 
irning to students who are residents of the Commonwealth. 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 

ISTION #5 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, 
ch was approved by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held August 5, 
i9, received 239 votes in the affirmative and in the negative, and in a joint session of 
I two branches held May 12, 1971, received 266 votes in the affirmative and in the nagative? 



3868 
2163 
968 
6999 



: proposed amendment would annul Article 49 of the Articles of Amendment to the Constitution 
i substitute a new amendment which declares that the people have the right to clean air and 
er, freedom from excessive and unnecessary noise, and the natural, scenic, historic and 
hetic qualities of their environment. It further declares that the protection of the 
;ht to the conservation, development and utilization of the agricultural, mineral, forest, 
er, air and other natural resources is a public purpKDse. 

Legislature is authorized to adopt necessary legislation and to provide for eminent domain 
:ings where required for the purposes of the amendment. Any property so taken may only be 
d for other purposes or disposed of upon a two-thirds vote of the Legislature. 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 

STION #6 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, 
ch was approved by the General Court in a joint Session of the two branches held July 2, 
9, received 204 votes in the affirmative and 49 in the negative, and in a joint session of 

two branches held May 12, 1971, received 245 votes in the affirmative and 20 in the 
ative? 



4807 
1062 
1130 
6999 



mary 

proposed amendment would authorize, but not require, the Legislature to modify the 
sachusetts income tax laws by the use of graduated rates instead of the present flat or 
form rates. The Legislature could do this in any one of three ways: 

1. Apply a uniform rate or percentage to an individual's federal income 
tax liability; or 

2. Apply graduated rates to an individual's Federal taxable income; or 

3. Apply graduated rates to income determined to be taxable under Massachusetts 
law. 

Legislature would also be authorized to provide for reasonable exemptions, deductions and 
tements and make the definition of any term used in the state tax law automatically the same 
it is under Federal Law. 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 

; >TI0N #7.- Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, 
l;h was approved by the General Court in a Joint Session of the two branches held June 18, 
I', received 198 votes in the affirmative and 63 in the negative, and in a joint session of 

two branches held May 12, 1971, received 231 votes in the affirmative and 31 in the 

itive? 

135 



1820 
4489 
690 
6999 



STATE ELECTION 



November 7 , 19 



Summary 

The proposed amendment would require that all judges must retire upon reaching seventy years of 
age. 

Yes 463 
No 148 

Blanks 88 

699 

QUESTION #8 

Do you approve of an act passed by the General Court in the year nineteen hundred and 
seventy-two, entitled: "An Act lowering to eighteen years the age requirement of a person 
licensed to sell or allowed to purchase alcoholic beverages? 

Yes 279 
No 343' 
Blanks 77 

699 

QUESTION #9 

Shall the voluntary recitation of prayer be authorized in the public schools of the 
commonwealth?" 

Yes 532 
No 891 
Blanks 78 

699' 

QUESTION #10 

D. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale of all alcoholic beverages by 
hotels having a dining room capacity of not less than ninety-nine persons and lodging capacity 

of not less than fifty rooms? L 

Yes 376; 
No 184i 
Blanks 139 

699' 

E. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of alcoholic beverages 
by restaurants and function rooms having a seating capacity of not less than one hundred 
persons? 

Yes 362< 
No 189: 
Blanks 147! 

699< 

There were (168) absentee ballots, and (11) partial ballots. 

Total ballots cast (not including partial ballots) 699' 
After the declaration of the vote, the meeting adjourned at 1:45 a.m. 

ATTEST: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



136 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASH ACCOUNT 
Year Ending llllllll 



ince of as of January 1, 1972 
Id: Cash Receipts 1972 

jduct: Cash Expenditures 1972 
ance on Hand 12/31/72 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 



Collections : 
rior Years Levies 

Personal Property 

Real Estate Taxes 
irrent Levy 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

'tterments Added to Taxes 

Water - Prior Levies 
- Current Levy 

Street - Prior Levies 
- Current Levy 
Iter Liens Added to Taxes 

Prior Levies 

Current Levy 

IX Titles & Possessions 

Tax Titles Redeemed 

sessments Paid in Advance 

Water 

Street 

apportioned Betterments - Paid in full 
Street 

o-Forma Taxes 



t Term Loans; 



2,291.94 



182,730 


60 


6,106,182 


31 


1,437 


50 


6,980 


00 


331 


98 


8,844 


70 


2,762 


72 


15,227 


88 



6,740.38 
2,296.19 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



I pay expenditures of Town Departments 
I Until Taxes are Collected 
Ighway Lo ans Chapter 81 and 90 

tnporary Loan in Anticipation of 

Serial Issue 
Term Loans : 

rchase of Land for School Purposes 



3,250,000.00 

26,332.00 

10,000.00 



734,006.35 
17,337,324.74 
18,071,331.09 
16.863,314.60 
1,208,016.49 



115,611.00 

6,288,912.91 

8,417.50 
9,176.68 

17,990.60 
33,853.11 

9,036.57 

7,149.75 
18.26 6,490,166.38 



3,286,332.00 

61.800.00 3,348,132.00 



137 



'1 




GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Aid ; 
Schools : 

Federal Employment Act 
National Defense Education Act 
Education Children of Low Income Families 
Head Start 

Bureau of Library Extensions 
Consumer & Homemaking PL 90-576 
Public Grants: 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chp. 
Middlesex County, Chapter 90 
State Aid to Public Libraries 
Veterans Benefits, State 



81 & 90 



55,372.00 
3,592.68 

52,722.81 

11,461.00 
6,123.24 

23.371.00 

34,638.28 
7,869.14 
6,413.25 

36,445.29 



152,642.73 



85,365.96 



238,008.69 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



School Lunch Program 

State Reimbursements 

Program Receipts 
High School Athletic Association 
Recreation Accounts 



108,264.12 
205,327.19 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



313,591.31 
7,118.50 
1.643.00 



322,352.81 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Department ; 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water Installations 

Industrial Fire Protection Rates 
Refunds & Reimbursements (Approp.) 
Refunds (Surplus Revenue) 
Recording Fees 
Group Insurance Dividend 
Accrued Interest, Sale of Bonds 
Premium, Sale of Bonds 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Police Training Program 
Veterans Aid Recoveries 
Sale of Tax Possessions 
Conservation Trust Account 
Water Available Surplus 
Carter Lecture Fund 



272,718.60 
2,941.92 
2,186.50 
13,590.33 



22,346.34 



291,437.35 
16,613.03 
5,486.73 
249.70 
5,073.00 
96.15 
5.00 
5,850.00 
337.36 
493.50 
1,350.00 
1,002.60 
460.27 
266.12 



I 



351,067.15 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



Short Term Investments-Treasury Bills 
Employees Deductions ; 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

Retirement System 

Group Insurance 

Blue Cross /Blue Shield 

U.S. Savings Bonds 

Fish & Game Licenses Collected for State 

Dog Licenses Collected for County 

Registry Releases, Motor Vehicles 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Washington Nat'l. Insurance (Teachers) 



2,850,000.00 

807,423.59 
234,296.00 
253,757.55 
4,225.46 
96,477.22 
750.00 
4,864.25 
5,272.30 
308.00 
3,109.91 
3.638.23 



4,264,122.51 



138 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



ome and Sales Tax : 
ools 

uatlon Basis Distribution 

mbursement , Loss of Taxes 

al Aid, Lottery Fund 

or Vehicle Excise Collections ! 

rior Levies 

urrent Levy 

m Animal Excise 

er Rates 

ulance Collections 
enses. Liquor 
erests & Costs : 
[lort Term Investments 
ax Collections 
ater Demands 
IX Titles Redeemed 
Lcipal Receipts : 
;lectmen, Board of 
IX Collector 
jwn Clerk 
Lanning Board 
)lice Department 
iilding Inspector 
Building Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Gas Fitting Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
ialer of Weights & Measures 
nm Engineer 
Lghway Department 
Snow Plowing Reimbursement 
Highway Fund, Chp, 58-55/18B 
tmetery Department 
ialth & Sanitation 
Public Health Nurse 
Licenses & Permits 
Clinics 
Sale of Dogs 
lols : 

;hool Construction Reimb. 

'ening School Tuition 

•iver Education Tuition 

lition for Special Education (SEEM) 

scellaneous Receipts 

cational Tuition 

hool Transportation 

gional Vocational School Reimb. 

ate Reimbursement Tuition & Trans. 

ary Fines 

eation Department (State Reimb.) 

Telephone Commissions 
th District Court Fines 
d District Court Fines 
lesex County House of Correction 
License Reimbursements 
ranee Claims & Reimbursements 
. of Natural Resources, 
aservation Land Purchases 
ervation Commission 
sion of Standards 
ic Welare Adm. /State 
ral Hghwy. Safety Program/ Amburlance 
allaneous Receipts 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 



12,546.50 
3,596.50 
864.00 



3,523.51 
48,585.37 



325.00 
2,910.50 
1,415.15 

327.00 

254,865.91 
1,660.50 
2,700.00 
3,605.00 
160.24 
1,068.00 
91,630.16 
111,603.85 
21.369.13 



105,214.38 
270,416.44 



13,861.12 
10,221.12 
3,474.38 
10,236.16 

1,124.00 
2,588.00 
5,553.75 
30.00 
2,459.00 



18,165.50 
498.00 
488.00 



52,108.88 
6,975.00 



4,977.65 



Reimb . 



488,662.79 
1,243.27 
4,322.44 
243.69 
3,857.25 
100.00 
100.00 
2,826.65 
10,683.74 

10,000.00 
50.00 
46.00 
15.00 
7,500.00 
38.00 



1,167,750.81 
20,058.54 
468.65 
47,912.10 



375,630.82 
79.86 
37,466.78 
3,658.25 
8,000.00 



37,792.78 



624,656.61 



17.337.324.74 



139 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 12/31/72 



Refunds: 

Personal Property Taxes 
Real Estate Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Tax Title Recording Fees 
Sale of Tax Possessions Recording Fees 
Unapportioned Water Betterments 
Water Betterments 
Water Committed Interest 
Water Department: 
Rates 

Water Liens 
Water Misc. 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Comm. & Industrial Fire Protection Rates 
Motor Vehicle Registry Releases 
Assessments - State & County 

County Hospital 

County Tax 

County Retirement 

State Audit 

State Recreation 

M.D.C. Sewer 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

Mass. Bay Transit Authority 

Ipswich River Watershed District 
Temporary Loans: 

Anticipation of Taxes 

Anticipation of Reimbursement 
Water Department: 

Maintenance & Operation 

Main Street Well Field 

Oakwood Road Water Betterment 
Street Betterments: 

Ferguson Road 

Kenwood Avenue 

Englewood Drive 

Marcia Road, Northerly 

Carolyn Road 

Marcia Road, Southerly 

Elwood Road 

Floradale Avenue 

Sherwood Road 

West Street 
Marcia Road Subdivision Completion 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 
Sewer Construction Grants 
Completion of Dell Drive 
Shawsheen Avenue School 
Wilmington Memorial Library 
Employee Deductions: 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

Retirement System 

Teachers Retirement 

Group Insurance 

U. S. Savings Bonds 



224.68 
1.32 
10.00 
1,664.81 
170.70 



8,507.17 
149,326.97 
128,024.00 
6,067.06 
26,616.00 
61,635.76 
1,693.95 
522.04 
854.55 
161,006.02 
107.23 



166.40 
28,620.98 
9,399.85 
229.28 
11.22 
159.26 
6.08 
36.04 



285,858.14 



258,502.61 



235,351.97 
1,815.34 
6,585.10 

152.35 
9,431.09 
3,542.28 
2,623.84 

431.56 
2,927.92 

159.32 
3,817.96 
17,030.08 



807,148.80 
231,710.90 
96,627.18 
147,948.54 
4,253.42 
750.00 



38,6: 



2.0 

3' 



243,75 



61,14 
31 
5,02 
24,16 
3,53 
2,69 
83 



140 



I 



yee Deductions (continued) 
e Cross/Blue Shield 
hington National Insurance 

Sheltered Annuities 
y Accounts : 

Licenses Due the County 
h & Game Licenses Due the State 
ation Dedicated Account 

e Training 

rvation Trust 

al Grants & Aids 

le VI-B P/L 91-230 

eau of Library Extensions 

eral Employment Act P/L 874 

sumer and Homemaker 

ding Skills 

d Start 

1 Lunch Program 

School Athletic Association 

ery Sale of Lots 

ds - Surplus Revenue 

er Available Surplus 

ulance 

Term Investments 
r Lecture Fund 
ated Receipts 

Total Expenditures from General Accounts 



76,473.56 
1,833.54 
565.83 



5,437.65 
4.864.25 



3,673.73 
7,543.64 
18,274.30 
19,739.36 
49,011.88 
11,461.00 



1,367,311.77 



10,301.90 
1,817.50 
337.36 
1,002.60 



109,703.91 
312,213.82 
3,619.57 
60.00 
59,415.87 
146.53 
54.00 
2,364,000.00 
266.12 
567.42 

$ 8,460,894.33 



141 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1972 

ASSETS 



Cash 

Short Term Investments 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected : 
Prior Levies 

Personal Property, 1971 
Personal Property Taxes 

in Litigation, 1969 
Real Estate, 1971 
Current Levy 

Personal Property 
Real Estate 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes ; 
Prior Levies 1967 
1968 
1970 
1971 

Current Levy 

Tax Titles & Possessions : 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 

Assessments Added to Taxes : 

Street Assessments 1971 
Committed Street Interest 1971 
Water Assessments 1971 
Committed Water Interest 1971 
Street Assessments 1972 
Committed Street Interest 1972 
Water Assessments 1972 
Committed Water Interest 19 72 

Unapportioned Assessments : 
Street Assessments 
Water Assessments 

Accounts Receivables : 
Water Department: 
Rates 

Water Services 
Water Installations 
Commercial & Industrial 
Fire Protection Rates 
Water Liens, 19 72 
Sewer Rates 
Highway Department 
State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 
Ambulance Services 
Veterans Services 
Unprovided for Accounts : 
Overlay Deficits 
Levy 1970 
1971 
1972 

Loans Authorized 
TOTAL ASSETS 



152 


.54 


462 


.00 




.03 


2,529 


,80 


206.108 


.08 


13 


.17 


1 


.90 


2,597 


.87 


13,613 


.16 


29 


.50 


17 


.72 


11 


.64 


6 


.13 


386 


.67 


197 


.72 


948 


.22 


422 


.56 



614.57 



208.637.88 



16,226.10 
64,331.26 



47.22 
17.77 



584.39 
1.370.78 



26,354.72 
448.39 
572.47 

3,426.66 
2.624.36 



1,208,016.49 
64,000.00 
400.00 



106,832.71 
74,553.77 



64.99 



44,809.64 
12,693.64 



33,426.60 
1,386.12 
97.00 
131,451.22 
36,525.45 
9,544.31 
5,608.46 



138.60 
5,835.31 
42,821.26 



1,272, 



209,252 



80,557 
181,386 



2,020 
57,503 



218, Oj 



48,795 
357.400 

$ 2.427,370, 



142 



I 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31. 19 72 

LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



irary Loans, Anticipation of 

mbursement (Highway) 

yee Payroll Deductions : 

eral Withholding 

te Withholding 

chers Retirement 

chers Insurance 

chers Tax Sheltered Annuities 

loyee Retirement 

up Insurance 

e Cross/Blue Shield, Teachers 
Employees 

Guaranteed Deposits 
y Accounts : 
nty Dog Licenses 
lings. Unclaimed Checks 
up Insurance Dividends 
e of Town Owned Land 
rued Interest, Sale of Bonds 
mium. Sale of Bonds 
emption. Assigned Tax Titles 
e of Cemetery Lots 
overies. Veterans Benefits 

Title Recording Fees 
or Vehicle Excide Taxes, 
ollected in Excess, 1969 
ving Funds : 
ool Lunch Program 
h School Athletic Association 
reation Accounts 
al Grants : 

eral Employment Act - PL 87A 

ional Defense Education - PL 85/864 

eau of Library Extensions, Title II 

ular Reading Skills 

sumer & Homemaking Education 

d Start Programs 

ming Disabilities 

te Aid to Free Public Libraries 

Btimates, 1972 Assessments : 

ity Tax 

te Recreation Assessment 

. C. Sewer Assessment 

ropolitan Air Pollution Control 

3. Bay Transit Authority 

■/ich River Watershed District 

is Authorized and Unissued 

( ariatlon Balances : 

:tions 

jistrial Development 
1 Treasurer 
Title Foreclosures 
I Collector 
rd of Assessors 
li Hall 
ining Board 
..ding Inspector 
I Engineer 



26,332.00 



274.79 
20,290.98 
26,741.24 
1,804.69 
2,544.08 
34.09 
34 7.44 
50.78 
4,099.42 



175.05 
4,001.17 
24.718.00 



10,723.52 
5,451.92 
127.00 

55.952.26 
49,125.09 
681.54 
10,175.21 
3,631.64 
120.87 
11.27 



5,836.76 
4,881.59 
1,048.05 
61. 74 
10,287.98 
2,130.46 



25.50 
4,302.81 
440.00 
2,088.18 
71.70 
2,000.00 
463.04 
2,886.00 
86.16 
344.50 



56,187.51 
585.05 



28,894.22 
270.00 
96.83 
5.00 
44.62 
5,790.00 
493.50 
11.14 

26.40 



16,302.44 



119,697.88 
6,413.25 



24,246.58 
357,400.00 



143 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Appropriation Balances ; (continued) 

Highway Department 

Sidewalk Account 

Road Machinery Expenses 

Road Machinery Outlay 

Chapter 90 Construction: 1966 

1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 

Public Street Lights 
Installation of Traffic Lights 
Park Department 
Cemetery Department 
Board of Health, Outlay 
Garbage Collection 
Veterans Services, Aid 
School Department, Expenses 
School Maintenance 

Contractual Services 

Fuel, Heating 

Outlay 

School Grounds Maintenance, Outlay 
Maintenance of Town Building 

Contractual Services 

Outlay 

Recreation Account, Salary Other 
Conservation Commission 
Comprehensive Professional Audit 

Analysis of Town Accounting Records 
Appraisals 
Andover Street 

Local Dist. of Federal Surplus Foods 
Surveys and Engineering Studies, 

Additional Sanitary Land Fill Sites 
Acquisition of Land for Municipal 

Sanitary Purposes 
Electric Utility Study 

Engineering & Title Search, Town owned Land 

Data Processing Payrolls 
Completion of Private Enterprise Projects 

Completion of Dell Drive 

Marcia Road Subdivision Completion 

Esquire Estates Completion 
Non-Revenue Accounts : 

Acquire Land, School Purposes 

Wobuim St. School Construction 

Wobum St. School Addition 

Shawsheen Ave. School Construction 

Preliminary Plans, New High School 

West Inter. School Construction 

Wilmington Memorial Library 

Relocate Shawsheen Ave. Bridge 

Sewer Construction Grants 

Water Betterments, Hudson Street 

Lawrence Street 
Royal Street 
Oakwood Road, etc. 



3,644.59 
9,000.00 
9,000.00 
9,450.00 
2,217.39 
9,450.00 
9.450.00 



610.00 
7,434.49 
577.92 
11,400.00 



1,728.10 
3,630.16 
13,418.99 



5,734.63 
5.394.43 



59.71 
98.70 
2,721.28 



1,864.76 
877.00 
889 . 86 

8.675.90 



52,211.98 
3,558.65 
15,000.00 
713.00 
7,083.30 
86.16 
2,833.40 
18,153.22 
8,722.85 



18,777.25 
4,235.60 



11,129.06 
200.00 
2,470.98 

5,000.00 
2,070.00 
1,480.34 
846.57 

30,000.00 

4,950.00 
13,000.00 
4,896.38 



2,879.69 

75,000.00 
4,923.84 
9,502.21 

49,659.98 

48,000.00 
9,747.22 

40,410.41 
3,000.00 
9,100.00 



12,307.52 



144 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Revenue Accounts : (continued) 

velop Salem Street Well Field 

estnut Street Well Field 

in Street Well Field 

drich Road Well Site 

nping Station Town Park 

velop Three Well Sites 

reet Betterments: Ferguson Road 
Kenwood Avenue 
Jere Road 
Englewood Drive 
Marcia Rd. , Northerly 
Carolyn Road 
Marcia Rd., Southerly 
Elwood Road 
Flordale Avenue 
West Street 

Imington Redevelopment Authority 

nnis Courts, Glen Road 

Shawsheen Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Woburn Street 

stall Lights, Shawsheen St. School 

West Intermediate School 

terans Retirement 

vil Defense 

srwood Road 

lue Reserved Until Collected ; 

tor Vehicle Excise Revenue 

scial Assessments Revenue 

partmental Revenue 

X Title & Possession Revenue 

ter Revenue 

<»er Revenue 

ite & County Aid to Highway Revenue 

serve for Petty Cash Advances 

Lus Revenues : 

:er Available Surplus 

rplus Revenue, General 



. LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



4,876.68 
.90 
23.23 
11.81 
51.31 
9.47 
19.49 
530.31 
40.36 
2,172.87 

12,775.00 
391.83 
16,000.00 
13,500.00 
1,216.51 
1,322.38 



76,355.57 
4,604.06 
2,449.89 
50.00 
30,000.00 
4.81 



7,736.43 
178,844.40 



42,666.83 

2,538.89 
2,111.05 
731.74 
249.35 



612,873.89 



80,530.96 
59,523.44 
15,222.77 
181,386.48 
33,373.47 
1,439.25 
130,633.77 
400.00 



502,510.14 

171,972.70 
255,068.36 



$ 2.427.370.55 



145 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES FOR 19 72 



SELECTMEN 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Town Meeting Expenses 
Supplies Office 



1,562.50 
1,069.30 
1,820.15 
3,263.49 
89.10 
7,804.54 



TOWN COLLECTOR 

Salary Town Collector 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



9,9 

7.4' 
1 
2 

T 

18,6 



ELECTIONS 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay Voting Machines 



9,022.80 
391.00 
270. 79 
172.15 

6,266.70 
16,123.44 



TOWN CLERK 

Salary Town Clerk 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



10,0 
7,7' 

4: 

1 

2i 

18,6' 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 
Printing Adv. Binding 
Supplies 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 



TOWN MANAGER 

Salary Town Manager 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



COMMUNITY & ECONOMICAL DEVELOPMENT 
Salaries 

Trans. & Ind . Promotion 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Salary Town Accountant 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



TOWN TREASURER 

Salary Administrative Ass't. 

Salary Other 

Repairs & Maintenance 

Misc. Services 

Supplies Office 

Tas Title Foreclosures 



4,246.31 
1,200.87 
1,400.43 
48.70 
6,896.31 



240.62 
2,297.02 

474.06 
33.26 
3,044.96 



20,542.40 
8,351.24 
115.50 
497.58 
383.75 

29,890.47 



208. 75 
293.07 
261.62 
542.50 
295.09 
1,601.03 



13,358.06 
8,018.38 
77.60 
428.94 
21,882.98 



11,863.30 
7,667.44 
7.50 
316.90 
1,111.55 
14,277.71 
35,244.40 



ASSESSORS 

Salary Principal Assessor 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



TOWN COUNSEL 

Personal Services 
Contr. Services 



TOWN HALL 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 
Pos tage 

Supplies Office 
Outlay 



PLANNING BOARD 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Salary Chief 
Salary Lieutenant 
Salary Sergeants 
Salary Patrolmen 
Salary Traffic Super. 
Salary Clerk 
Salary Extra Detail 
Salary Vacations 
Salary Sick Leave 
Salary Paid Holidays 
Salary Police Dog Officer 
Add. Police Off. & Ancillary Costs 
Repairs & Maint. 
Misc. Services 
Maint. of Dogs 
Clothing & Rubber Goods 



13,9; 

16,0 

4,0 

5; 

34,6: 



12, 5( 



17,9' 



1,8; 

9,0< 

3; 



15, 6( 

13,6: 

68, 5^ 
24 7,5: 
26, Si 
7,1; 
24, 4( 
32, 9« 
16,3<f 
13, ( 

7.5: 

2,0;* 

8(1 

7,9:; 



146 



CE DEPARTMENT (continued) 

soline & Oil 

pplies Office 

lall Tools & Equipment 

tlay 



DEPARTMENT 



lary Chief 

lary Deputy Chief 

laries Lieutenants 

laries Privates 

laries Call Fire & Ambulance 

laries Vacations 

laries Sick Leave 

laries Paid Holidays 

pairs & Maintenance 

pairs Radio 

sc. Contr. Services 

othing & Rubber Goods 

soline & Oil 

pplies Office 

all Tools & Equipment 

tlay & Fire Alarm Ext. 



L DEFENSE 



laries 

30. Services 
ilities 
ansportation 
pplies Office 



FABLE 



Lary 



)FFICER 
Laries 

3C. Services 



)ING INSPECTOR 

:ary Building Inspector 

.aries Other 

.nting Adv. & Binding 

iS & Subscriptions 

ic. Services 

>plies Office 



) OF APPEALS 
aries 

'plies Office 



;R OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 
ary 

c. Services 



7,916.27 
1,520.16 
4,494.40 
431.24 
499,697.08 



15,194.52 
12,704.92 
44,655.47 
225,143.29 
9,719.85 
21,334.16 
14,222.72 
11,046.29 
5,164.79 
305.45 
828.83 
2,675.34 
1,486.46 
43.39 
2,007.94 
6,629.15 
373,162.57 



750.00 
687.73 
127.27 
44.00 
131.68 
1,740.68 



100 . 00 
100.00 



3,500.00 
1,780.00 
5,280.00 



11,237.02 
7,676.60 
205.25 
122.00 
1,080.45 
190.35 
20,511.67 



723.75 
215.00 
938. 75 



1,000.00 
24.15 
1,024.15 



TOWN ENGINEER 

Salary Town Engineer 

Salaries Other 

Misc. Repairs 

Misc. Contr. Services 

Gasoline & Oil 

Supplies Office 

Small Tools & Equipment 

Outlay 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Salary Superintendent 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Chemicals 

Clothing & Rubber Goods 

Supplies Construction 

Supplies Office 

Small Tools & Equipment 

Outlay 

Sidewalks 

Drainage 



ROAD MACHINERY 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Gasoline & Oil 



CHAPTER 90 CONSTRUCTION 1970 
Supplies Construction 



CHAPTER 90 MAINTENANCE 
Expenses 



CHAPTER 81 
Salaries 

Supplies Construction 



SNOW & ICE CONTROL 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Gasoline & Oil 
Salt & Sand 

Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay 



PUBLIC STREET LIGHTS 
Expenses 

Installation Traffic Lights 



13,288 


.67 


21,402 


26 


298 


41 


482 


82 


194 


21 


355 


58 


321 


16 


2,611 


34 


38,954 


45 


14,216 


30 


144,290 


78 


6,783 


04 


1,180 


48 


512 


19 


35,842 


98 


91 


83 


14,828 


38 


2,321 


10 


45,332 


85 


24,994 


77 


290,394 


70 


18,219 


01 


9,990 


54 


28,209 


55 


12,017 


05 


12,017 


05 


6,500 


00 


6,500 


00 


12,377 


97 


22,953 


64 


35,331. 


61 


42,228.04 


1,886, 


53 


24,337 


25 


4,974. 


69 


26,387 


34 


1,200 


03 


5,430 


00 


106,443 


88 


41,435 


19 





00 


41,435 


19 



147 



TREE WARDEN 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Misc. Services 
Chemicals 
Trees 

Small Tools & Equipment 
Gasoline & Oil 
Outlay 



DUTCH ELM CONTROL 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Chemicals 

Small Tools & Equipment 



GYPSY MOTH CONTROL 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Gasoline & Oil 
Chemicals 

Small Tools & Equipment 



PARK DEPARTMENT 
Salaries 

Maintenance & Supplies 
Outlay 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Salary Superintendent 
Salaries Other 
Repairs & Maintenance 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Liners 

Gasoline & Oil 

Supplies Care of Grounds 

Supplies Construction 

Supplies Office 

Small Tools & Equipment 

Outlay 



WATER DEPARTMENT 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Public Utilities 
Transportation 
Gasoline & Oil 
Meters & Meter Parts 
Pipes & Fittings 
Supplies Construction 
Supplies Office 
Supplies Plant 
Outlay 



16,656.36 
433.65 
682.15 
3,749.96 
1,999.40 
396.37 
1,196.55 
1,000.00 
26,114.44 



13,710.00 
405.25 
1,667.50 
625.31 

16,408.06 



10,076.00 
205.84 
695.41 
1,223.28 
104.64 

12,305.17 



2,993.16 
415.40 
4,223.46 
7,632.02 



10,750.56 
42,540.81 
1,995.46 
7,934.99 
1,301.25 
622.95 
1,891.48 
589.11 
124.22 
525.20 
370. 70 
68,646.73 



121,252.26 
9,504.46 
6,826.03 
33,530.27 
620.00 
4,983.93 
6,470.79 
13,719.04 
1,000.74 
5,495.76 
3,482.41 
28,466.28 
235,351.97 



BOARD OF HEALTH 
Salary Director 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Clinic Expenses 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 

Out Patient Clinic 
Hospital & Medical 
Garbage Collection 
Town Dump 



VETERANS SERVICES 



Salary Director 

Salary Other 

Misc. Contr. Services 



Supplies 


Office 


Outlay 






Veterans 


Aid 




SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 


Salaries 


Sec. 


& Clerk 


Salaries 


Prof. 


(Central Office) 


Salaries 


Sec. 


& Clk. (Central Office) 


Salaries 


Prof. 


(Subj. Spec.) 


Salaries, 


Prof. 


(Elem. Prin.) 


Salaries 


Prof. 


(Inter. Prin.) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Sr. High Prin.) 


Salaries , 


Sec. 


& Clerk (Elem.) 


Salaries 


Sec . 


& Clerk (Jr. High) 


Salaries , 


Sec . 


& Clerk (Sr. High) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Substitutes) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Elem. Teachers) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Jr. High Teachers) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Sr. High Teachers) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Elem. Guidance) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Jr. High Guidance) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Sr. High Guidance) 


Salaries , 


Non-Prof . (Attend. & Census) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Sch. Nurse & Phys.) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Cafeteria Supervisor) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Sp. Class Teachers) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Instruction 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


(Supervision) 


Salaries , 


Prof. 


( Ins true tion) 



Contracted Services 

Other Exp. (Assoc. & Publications) 

Contracted Services 

Supplies (Central Office) 

Other Exp. (In Town Travel) 

Supplies (Music & Art) 

Travel In State 

Travel Out of State 

Contr. Serv. (Teachers Aides) 

M. E. C. (In Serv. Prog.) 

Contracted Serv. (Instr. Program) 

Supplies (Elem. Stat. & Supp.) 

Supplies (Jr. High Stat.& Supp.) 

Supplies (Sr. High Stat.& Supp.) 



148 



)0L DEPARTMENT (continued) 

ipplies (Elem. Texts & Inst. Aids) 30,898.94 
ipplies (Jr. High Texts & Inst. Aids) 26,072.97 
ipplies (Sr. High Texts & Inst. Aids) 26,669.67 

Ipplies (Elem. Library Texts) 7,750.56 

ipplies (Jr. High Library Texts) 3,041.13 

ipplies (Sr. High Library Texts) 4,656.32 

V. Aids 6,674.97 

ipplies (A.V. Aids) 4,899.99 

lidance & Counselling 13,306.00 

ipplies (Guidance & Counsel.) 4,487.47 

D. E. A. 4,552.71 

ipplies (Nurses) 304.32 

■ansportation (Pupils) 132,845.70 

•ansportation (Athletic) 7,617.00 

ipplies (Physical Education) 16,208.32 

•ansportation (Educational Trips) 8,494.80 

ilities (Elementary) 38,276.43 

ilities (Jr. High) 19,574.23 

ilities (Sr. High) 25,631.44 

intenance & Repairs (Elementary) 2,263.21 

Intenance & Repairs (Jr. High) 2,162.41 

intenance & Repairs (Sr. High) 10,138.16 

pital Outlay 32,742.42 

ipplies (Special Class) 2,056.77 

ition (Special Class) 17,445.86 
pplies (Sp. Class Texts & Inst. Aid) 4,738.94 

ansportation (Special Class) 23,471.95 

uipment (Special Class) 3,157.41 



4,040,860.56 



SCHOOL GROUNDS MAINTENANCE (continued) 
Outlay 



MAINTENANCE OF TOWN BUILDINGS 



Repairs & Maintenance 

Utilities 

Outlay 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OL DEPARTMENT 19 71 
penses 



674.96 



Salary Director 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Services 
Programs & Activities 
Supplies Books 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 



RECREATION 

Salary Director 

Salaries Other 

Misc. Service 

Community Youth Programs 

Supplies Office 

Supplies Playground & Beach 



PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Contr. Services 



674.96 



10,254.80 
17,796.71 



1,966.91 
29,613.37 

4,916.41 
36,496.69 



12,165.18 
47,593.47 
435.11 
300.00 
35,278.29 
4,210.96 
1,650.00 
101,633.01 



10,280.87 
36,192.24 

4,403.46 
10,484.25 
758.58 

4,111.95 
66,231.35 



1,335.00 
4.91 
12,917.00 
14,256.91 



TIONAL TRAINING 
ition 

ansportation 



3L MAINTENANCE 
lary Superintendent 
laries Other 
pairs & Maintenance 
sc. Contr. Services 
iidalism 

pbish Collection 
Lf orms 

tchen Repairs 

soline & Oil 

jplies Plant 

ill Tools & Equipment 

il Heating 

)airs Oil Burners 

>airs Roof 

:lay 



IL GROUNDS MAINTENANCE 
•airs & Maintenance 
loline & Oil 
iplies Care of Grounds 
ill Tools & Equipment 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



6,762 


37 


Salaries 


572. 


50 


738.50 


Dues St Subscriptions 


110 


00 


7,500 


87 


Engineering Services 


221. 


95 






Jr. Conservation Camp 


240 


00 






Trees & Shrubs 


29 


96 


13,748.54 


Supplies Office 


194 


10 


372,807 


98 


Misc. Materials 


191 


90 


21,762 


86 


Pur. Land & Land Improvement 


1,121.07 


9,632 


50 


Outlay 


0, 


00 


7,888 


64 


2,681 


48 


6,597 


75 








6,402 


75 


UNCLASSIFIED 






2,534 


92 


Reserve Fund 


42,875 


00 


1,311 


31 


Bonds and Insurance 


92,052 


98 


22,349 


81 


Sewer Maintenance 


1,000 


00 


337 


25 


Town Report 


1,632 


50 


67,567 


50 


Local Transportation: 






6,789 


97 


Selectmen 


500 


00 


25,000 


00 


Town Manager 


7 


40 


31,885 


20 


Town Accountant 


50 


00 


596,616 


98 


Town Treasurer 


39 


10 






Town Collector 


39 


10 






Town Clerk 


11 


00 


1,612 


41 


Assessors 


421 


80 


274 


71 


Planning Board 


95 


40 


5,413 


66 


Police Department 


765 


00 


241 


13 


Dog Officer 


978 


20 



149 




^ r . 



UNCLASSIFIED (continued) 

Local Transportation (continued) 

Building Inspector 1,134.90 

Cemetery Department 600.00 

Board of Health 2,371.00 

Veterans Services 626.00 

Public Library 42.00 
Training & Conferences In State 

Selectmen 498.50 

Finance Committee 110.00 

Town Manager 253.86 

Town Accountant 111.00 

Town Treasurer 31.00 

Town Collector 39.00 

Town Clerk 143.19 

Assessors 445.00 

Planning Board 153.00 

Police Department 1,085.06 

Fire Department 358.85 

Building Inspector 27.00 

Town Engineer 49.25 

Tree Department 35.00 

Board of Health 447. 75 

Veterans Services 196.75 

Maintenance Department 373.09 

Public Library 23.50 

Recreation 80.00 

E.E.A. 13.00 
Training & Conferences Out of State 

Town Manager 928.75 

Assessors 246.50 

Maintenance Department 200.00 

Public Library 81.30 

Lease of Quarters 1,500.00 

Financial Modeling Plan 4,000.00 

Blue Cross & Insurance 72,036.56 

Memorial & Veterans Day 1,991.90 
Comprehensive Professional Audit & 

Analysis of Town Accounting Records 5,000.00 

Appraisals 2,930.00 

Andover Street 0.00 

Cruisers 1971 0.00 

Cruisers & K-9 Wagon 10,334.00 

Ambulance 1971 15,035.22 

1/2 Ton Truck Fire Dept. 3,867.09 

3/4 Ton Truck Highway 2,610.71 

Catch Basin Cleaner 4,900.00 

Repair Roller Highway 2,706.78 

3 1/2 Ton Chassis & Cab Tree 6,624.72 

3/4 Ton Truck Cemetery 3,690.00 

2 1/2 Ton Truck Public Bldgs. 7,136.06 

Regional Voc. Sch. Dist. Comm. 276,354.00 

Unpaid Bills 13,642.53 

1972 Salary Adj. & Add'l. Costs 76,848.61 
Additional Employees: 

Public Buildings 19,761.00 

Library 6,755.00 

Highway 5,191.00 

Land for Conservation, Berry 20,000.00 

Land for Recreation, Union & Grove 19,200.00 

Land for Conservation, Thrush 0.00 

Land for Conservation, Lot 7-A 20,200.00 

Pur. Land Eminent Domain, Joyce 0.00 



Surveys & Engineering Studies/ 
Add. Sanitary Land Fill Sites 

Land for Municiapl Sanitary Purposes 

Local Dist. Federal Surplus Foods 

Land for Recreation, Grove Ave. 

Completion of Dell Drive 

Veterans Retirement 

By-Law Study Committee 

Drug Dependency Problems 

Electric Utility Study 

Engineering & Title Search 
Town Owned Land 

Data Processing Payrolls 



MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 
Schools 

General Government 

Water 

Sewer 

Interest on Anti. Notes & Auth. Fees 



3,25 
8,65 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTS 

Land for School Projects, Salem St. 

Land for School Sites 

Woburn Street School 

Wobum Street Addition 

Shawsheen Ave. School 

Prel. Plans New High School 

West Intermediate School 

Wilmington Memorial Library 

Relocate Shawsheen Ave. Bridge 

Sewer Construction Grants 

Hudson Street 

Lawrence Street 

Royal Street 

Oakwood Rd. , Reading Ave., Maple Road 

and David Road 
Salem Street Well Field 
Chestnut Street Well Field 
Main Street Well Field 
Aldrich Road Well Site 
Const. Perm. Pumping Station 

Town Park Well Field 
Dev. Three Well Sites 
Ferguson Road 
Kenwood Avenue 
Jere Road 
Englewood Drive 
Marcia Road Northerly 
Carolyn Road 
Marcia Road Southerly 
Elwood Road 
Floradale Avenue 
West Street 

Esquire Estates Completion 
Marcia Road Subdivision Completion 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 
Accept as Town Ways: Dell Drive 
B aland Road 
Hopkins Street 



633, 93^^ 
112,75 9 
110,40 
27,30 
43,88 



928,28 



6,58 
45,26 

1,81 



15 
9,43 

3,54 
2,62 

43 
2,92 

15 
3,81 
21,02 

31 
5,02 
4 
2 

10,541 



150 



STRUCTION ACCOUNTS (continued) 
Iscontinue as Town Way part of 

Andover Street 44.58 

lerwood Road 17,030.08 

3vm Beach Improvements 0.00 

jpair Roof North Intermediate Sch. 2,675.00 

;nnis Courts Glen Road 0.00 



I 



Tennis Courts, Shawsheen Ave. Sch. 

Tennis Courts, Wildwood St. Sch. 

Tennis Courts, Wobum St. School 

Installation of Lights: 
Shawsheen Ave. School 
North Intermediate School 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1972 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF THE YEAR 19 72 



0.00 
0.00 
0.00 

0.00 
0.00 



174,359.10 



r Vehicle Excise 

nses 

s 

lal Assessments 
ral Government 

ection of Persons & Property 

th and Sanitation 

ways 

ol (Local receipts of 

hool Committee) 

aries (Local receipts) 

eation (State reimbursements) 

teries (Other than sale of lots) 

rests 

Animal Excise 
lance Service 
r Revenue 

ellaneous Receipts 
lus Revenue (Late receipts) 
a Receipts (Cherry Sheet) 
ral Highway Safety Program 
mbulance purchase reimb.) 



434,133 


.48 


366,341 


.52 






4,000 


.00 


8,000 


.00 


4,000 


.00 


12,024 


.00 


4,057 


.25 






12,144 


.10 


18,622 


.62 


6,478 


.52 


6,783 


91 


9,295 


.75 


2,511 


84 


19,451 


65 


21,122 


50 


1,670 


85 


4,846 


50 


4,977 


65 


131 


15 


2,246 


20 


4,011 


51 


1,765 


31 


7,003 


00 


4,520 


74 






1,319 


10 


1,243 


27 






370 


00 


4,322 


44 


3,952 


44 


6,806 


50 


6,975 


00 


168 


50 


24,701 


08 


37,792 


78 


13,091 


70 


129 


38 


79 


86 






3,370 


48 


3,604 


25 


233 


77 


26,821 


80 


37,466 


78 


10,644 


98 


3,902 


66 


3,219 


34 






33,329. 


94 


33,329 


94 






1,838,600 


10 


1,895,642 


24 


57,042 


14 






7,500. 


00 


7,500 


00 


$2,441^983 


88 


$2,472,125 


44 


$ 109,191 


20 



67,791.96 
7,966.75 



2,482.26 
75.83 



49.52 



683.32 



151 




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INSIDE DEBT LIMIT 

Elementary School Loan, Wildwood School 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $512,000,00 
Street Construction Bonds (1970) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $21,850.00 
Wilmington Memorial Library 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $485,000.00 
Nichols Street Bridge Loan 

G/L 44, Sec. 7, $31,600.00 
West Street Construction Bonds 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $35,100.00 
Sewer Main Bonds (19 71) 

G/L 44, Sec. 8, $275,000.00 
Street Construction Bonds (1971) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $64,505.00 
Urban Renewal Bonds (1971) 

G/L 121B, Sec. 20, $200,000.00 
Acquire Land School Purposes (1972) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10, $61,800.00 

OUTSIDE DEBT LIMIT 

Add. S. Alter. Jr/Sr. High School 

Acts 645/48, $1,375,000.00 
Add. & Alter. Jr/Sr. High School 

Acts 645/48, $400,000.00 
Glen Road School 

Acts 645/48, $450,000.00 
Boutwell Street School 

Acts 645/48, $400,000.00 
North Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,050,000.00 
Various School Projects 

Acts 645/48, $68,425.00 
Woburn Street School 

Acts 645/48, $597,000.00 
Woburn Street School Addition 

Acts 645/48, $660,000.00 
West Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,445,000.00 
Shawsheen Avenue School 

Acts 645/48, $1,674,720.00 
Shawsheen Ave. School (2nd Issue) 

Acts 645/48, $100,000.00 
Water Standpipe Bonds 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $152,000.00 
Water Main Bonds (1962) 

Chp. 44, Sec. "8, $86,000.00 
Water Main Bonds, New Well Field 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $463,529.00 
Salem Street Well Field 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $56,750.00 
Salem Street Well Field & Mains 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $320,000.00 



COMBINED TOTALS 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 

Balances Added 
1/1/72 1972 

50,000.00 

14,000.00 
410,000.00 

16,100.00 

28,800.00 
275,000.00 

64,505.00 
200,000.00 

61,800.00 
61,800.00 



1,058,405.00 
235,000.00 
140,000.00 
125,000.00 
160,000.00 
495,000.00 
23,000.00 
352,000.00 
520,000.00 
995,000.00 
1,325,000.00 
90,000.00 
20,000.00 
30,000.00 
270,000.00 
34,050.00 
295,000.00 
5,109,050.00 
6,167.455.00 



0.00 
61,800.00 



Paid-Off 
1972 




Bala 
12/3 


25,000 


00 




25,0 


7,000 


00 




7.« 


25,000 


00 




385 ,0 


7,500 


00 




8,6 


7,300 


00 




21,5 


15,000 


00 




260,0 


12,901 


00 




51,6 


20,000 


.00 




180,0 
61,8 


119,701 


00 


1, 


000,5 


65,000 


00 




170,0 


20,000 


00 




120,0 


25,000 


00 




100,0 


20,000 


00 




140,0 


55,000 


00 




440,0 


5,000 


00 




18,0 


30 , 000 


.00 




322,0 


35,000 


00 




485,0 


75,000 


.00 




920,0 


115,000 


.00 


1. 


210,0 


10,000 


.00 




80,0 


10,000 


00 




10,0 


5,000 


00 




25,0 


30,000 


00 




240,0 


11,350 


00 




22,7 


25,000 


00 




270,0 


536,350.00 




572,7 


656,051. 


00 


5, 


573,2 



160 



3n Mmarlnm 



Clara P. Chipman 
Mildred A. Dolan 
Laura N. Marland 
Joseph H. Richard 
Alphonse L. Savignac 
Frederick H. Ward 



FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



32 Boutmell School 

33 Buzzell School 
35 Center School 

37 Glen Rd. School 

38 High School 

41 Mildred Rogers School 

42 North Internrwdiate 

School 

43 West School 

44 Swain School 

46 Walker School 

47 West Internnediate School 

48 West School 

49 Shawsheen School 
51 Whitefleld School 

53 Wlldwood School 

54 Woburn Street School 

121 Main & Church Sts. 

122 Main & Middlesex Ave 
1222 Carr Fastener 

123 Main & Clark Sts. 

124 Washington Ave. 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Main St. & Bridge Lane 

127 Brand Ave. & Wiser St. 

128 Baker St. & Taplin Ave. 

129 Phillips Ave. & Wiser St. 

131 Hobson Ave. & Miles St. 

132 Main St. & 

Massachusetts Ave. 

133 Massachusetts Ave. & 

River St. 

134 Main & Harnden Sts. 

135 St. Dorothy's Church 

136 Veranda Ave. 

137 Main St. & Grove Ave. 

138 Grove & Wild Aves. 

139 Grove Ave & Burnap St. 

141 Grove Ave. & Lake St. 

142 Main St. & Glen Rd. 

143 Main & Lake Sts. 

144 Lake St. & Warren Rd 

146 Main & Davis Sts. 

147 Fairfield Ave. 

148 Marjorie Rd. 

149 Main St. at Tewksbury 

Line 

211 Burlington & Floradale 

Aves. 

21 1 1 Diamond Crystal Salt 

Company 

21 1 2 Sweetheart Plastic Corp. 

212 Burlington Ave & 

Harris St 

213 Cedar St. & Burt Rd. 

214 Deming Way (Old Age 

Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave & 

Chestnut St. 

216 Chestnut St & 

Butters Row 

217 Chestnut St. & Mill Rd 

218 Chestnut St & 

Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 

Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St. near 

Golf Club 

222 Chestnut St. at Woburn 

Line 

223 Marion & Day Sts. 

224 Marion & Clifton Sts. 

225 Marion St to 

Chestnut St 

226 Roberts Road 

227 Burlington Ave. & 

Boutwell St 

228 Boutwell St. & Taft Rd. 
229Taft & Swain Rds. 

231 Roosevelt Rd. 

232 Burlington Ave. & 

Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave. & 

Swain Rd. 

234 Beech St. 



235 Burlington Ave. & 

Forest St. 

236 Burlington Ave. at 

Burlington Line 

237 Forest St. & Congress St. 

238 Forest St. & 

Randolph Rd. 

239 Forest St. & 

Cochrane Rd. 

241 Elwood Rd. 

242 Forest St. & 

Edwards Rd. 

251 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Canal St. 

252 Canal St. & Burt Rd. 

253 Grand St. 

254 Nassau Ave. & 

Dunton Rd. 

255 Shawsheen Ave & 

Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane 

Norfolk St. 

257 Amherst Rd. 

258 Auburn Ave. 

259 Ferguson Rd. 

261 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Aldrich Rd. 

262 Aldrich Rd. & 

Hardin St. 

263 Aldrich Rd. & 

Kendall St. 

264 Aldrich Rd. & 

Boutwell St. 

265 Aldrich Rd. & Forest St. 

266 Winston Ave. 

267 Aldrich Rd. at 

Billerica Line 

268 Shawsheen Ave. near 

Cranberry Bog 

269 Wilton Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Bond St. 

273 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Hopkins St. 

274 Hopkins & Columbia 

Streets 

275 Hopkins & Dorchester 

Streets 

276 Hopkins St. at 

Billerica Ljne 

277 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Nichols St. 

278 Nichols St & 

Fairmeadow Rd 

279 Fairmeadow & 

Jere Rds 

281 Nichols St. at 

Billerica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave. at 

Billerica Line 

311 Main St. & Dublin Ave. 

312 Main & Lowell Sts. 
3121 Hayden Mica Co. 

313 Main St. & Butters Row 

314 Main St. at Town Park 
3142 Brewsters 

315 Main & Eames Sts. 

316 Eames St, 

3132 Polyvinyl Chemical 

3161 J.W. Gl'eer Co, 

3162 National Polychemical 

Co., Inc. 

3163 Dragon Cement Co. 

3164 Raffi & Swanson Inc. 

317 Cook Ave. 

318 Main St. at Woburn 

Line 

321 Lowell & Parker Sts. 

322 Parker & Blackstone 

Streets 

323 Lowell & Cross Sts. 

324 Lowell & Bay Sts. 
3241 Avco Corp. 

325 Lowell & Woburn Sts. 

326 Woburn & Elm Sts. 



327 Woburn St. & 

Brentwood Ave. 

328 Woburn St. & 

Morse Ave. 

329 Woburn & E vnes Sts. 

3291 Terrell Corp. 

3292 Int. Salt 

3293 NAPA 

3294 Ritter Trucking 
3295 Nova Devices 

331 Woburn St. & 

Industrial Way 
3313 Connnnodity Warehouse 

3314 Market Forge 

3315 Smithcraft 

332 S trout Ave. 

333 Lowell St. gt 

Woodland Rd. 

334 Lowell & West Sts. 

335 West St. & Westdale 

Avenue 

336 Ayotte St. & Crest 

Avenue 

337 Nickersoo Ave. 

338 West St. & 

Suncrest Ave. 

339 Suncrest Ave. & 

Meadow Lane 

341 West St. & Industrial Way 

Way 

341 2 Compugraphics 
3413 Scully Signal 
3415 Ling Electronics 

342 Lowell St., Rte. 93 

and Reading Line 

41 1 Church St., Fire Station 

412 Church & Columbia Sts. 

413 Church & Beacon Sts. 

414 Beacon St. & 

Belmont Ave. 

415 State St. & 

Fairview Ave. 

416 Church & Clark Sts. 

417 Methodist Church 

418 Church St. & 

Thurston Ave. 

419 Church & Adams Sts. 

421 Chandler & Kelley Rds. 

422 Adams St. Ext. 

423 Church St. & 

Middlesex Ave 

4231 New Library 

4232 Baptist Church 

424 Middlesex Ave. & 

Adelaide St. 

425 Middlesex Ave. & 

Clark St 

426 Clark St. & 

Railroad Ave 

427 Middlesex Ave. & 

Adams St. 

428 St. Thomas' Church 

429 Midctlesex Ave. & 

School St. 

431 School St. & Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane & Loumac Rd 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave & 

Wildwood St. 

435 Wildwood St. near 

Cemetery 

436 Wildwood St. near 

Vets Housing 

437 Wildwood & Woburn 

Streets 

438 Wing Rd. 

51 1 Middlesex Ave. & 

Glen Rd. 

512 Glendale Circle 

513 Glen Rd. & 

Lawrence St. 

514 Lawrence St. & 
Lawrence Ct. 



515 L8wrer)ce St. & 

Hamlin Lane 

516 Glen Rd. at 

R.R. Crossing 

517 Glen Rd. & Fay St. 

518 Glen Rd. & King St. 

519 King St. & Garden 

521 King & Kilby Sts. 

522 King & Broad Sts. 

523 Glen Rd. & Cypress St. 

524 Glen Rd. & Brattle St. 

525 Glen Rd. & Harnden St. 

526 Glen & Miller Rds. 

527 Faulkner & Beeching 

Aves. 

528 Faulkner & Allston 

Aves. 

529 Jones Ave. 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave. & 

Federal St. 

534 Federal & Concord Streets 

535 Federal & Grant Sts. 

536 Federal & Wilson Sts. 

537 Federal & Lincoln Sts. 

538 Federal & Pershing Sts. 

539 Federal & Library Sts. 

541 Federal & Woburn Sts. 

542 Woburn & West Sts. 

543 West & Kilmarnock Sts. 

545 Woburn St. at 

R.R. Crossing 

546 Concord & Woburn Sts. 
5461 Photon 

547 Concord St. at Rte. 93 

5471 Compugraphics, Concord St 

5472 Dynamics Research 
5475 Volkswagen 

5478 Machinist for 
Electronics 

5479 Barbo 

548 Concord St. at North 

Reading Line 

549 Woburn St. at 281 

551 Middlesex & Mystic 

Aves. 

551 1 Avco, North Wilmington 

5512 Photon, Inc. 

551 3 D.F. Munroe Paper Co. 
5514 Waltham Door & 
Windov.) Co. 

552 Middlesex Ave. & Shady 

Lane Drive 
5521 Mytron Inc. 

553 Shady Lane Drive & 

Oakdale Rd. 

554 Shady Lane Drive & 

Birchwood Rd. 

555 Shady Lane Drive & 

Sprucewood Rd. 

556 Pinewood & Oakdale 

Roads 

557 Birchwood & Judith Rds. 

558 Shady Lane Drive & 

Lawrence St. 



61 1 No. Wilmington 

Shopping Center 

612 Middlesex Ave. & 

North St. 

613 North St. & 

Pineridge Rd. 

614 North St. & Marcia Rd. 

615 Middlesex Ave. & 

High St. 

616 Linda & Carolyn Rds. 

617 High & Woburn Sts. 

618 Woburn » Park Sts. 

619 Park St. & Gowing Rd. 

621 Gowing & Marcus Rds. 

622 Park St. at No. Reading 

Line 



623 Middlesex Ave. & 

Salem St. 

624 Arlene & Catherine 

Aves. 

625 Barbara & Dorothy 

Aves. 

626 Salem St. at 

R.R. Crossing 

627 Salem & Cunninghan 

Streets 

628 Salem St. & 

McDonald Rd. 

629 McDonald Rd. to En 

631 Royal St. 

632 Salem St. at Tewksbi 

Line 

633 Salem & Ballardvale 

Streets 

634 Ballardvale St. at 

Rte. 125 

635 Ballardvale St. st 

No. 211 
5351 Charles River Breedii 
Laboratories 

636 Ballardvale St. at 

No. 326 

637 Ballardvale St. at An' 

Line 

638 Salem St at Rte. 93 

639 Salem & Woburn StsI 

641 Woburn St. & 

Hathaway Rd. 

642 Hawthorne Rd. 

643 Hathaway & 

Sheridan Rds. 

644 Hathaway & Gunder 

Roads 

645 Salem St. & Thrush 

646 Thrush Rd. & 

Marie Drive 

647 Salem St. at North 

Reading Line 

6471 Cronin's Pit 

6472 Benevento's Pit 

648 Woburn & Andover 

Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 

(Water Dept.) 

6482 AInsworth Road 

6483 Highway Dept. 

649 Andover St. & Rte, 1 

651 Andover St. at No. 3 

652 Andover St. at Ando 

Line 



SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a.m. & 

9 p.m.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 
22 No School (6:30a.m 
7:00 a.m. & 7:15a 

2 Followed by 3 round 

box - second alarm 

3 Followed by 3 round 

box • general alarrr 

MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds only) 
8 Out of Town 

81 To Andover 

82 To Billerica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No. Reading 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 

88 To Woburn 



FIRE - AMBULANCE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3200 

I ^ 'J 658-3346 

• ^5 -J^ 



POLICE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3331 

658-5071 
658-5072 
935-5966 



TOWN HALL 

658-3311 
935-5596 



TOWN HALL ANNE) 
657-7511 

NO SCHOOL 658-9841 



for Reference